Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What did you machine today?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • When you get rejects, you just got to eat them...

    Comment


    • Today I made a holder for my R-8 collets. I had a strip of 1/8" thick aluminium that was pretty rough on one side so after I milled it smooth it was 2" wide and I cut it to 3' in length, just the distance to span the two front uprights on a small shelving unit I have just behind the mill's table. I decided to put 16 one inch holes in it but I have only a Silver & Deming drill bit in that size and I wasn't sure it would make a nice neat hole in that thin of material and also not catch and rip the strip out of my vice with the ensuing mayhem that would have accompanied it. (I should have bought a step drill that goes up to 1 3/8" back when they were on sale but at the time I didn't think I would need one. Silly me. ) I decided to try to see if I could punch a hole through it with a knockout punch I have. It worked quite well and I'm pleased with the result. Just a slight deburring was all the holes needed. I also drilled a hole in the center of it to match up with a hole in the center of the edge of a steel shelf immediately above where I was going to attach the strip to support the strip and prevent it from twisting but after I loaded it will all my collets and boring heads and flycutter it didn't twist appreciably so I nixed that. I can always add a little support piece in the future if the strip starts to take a twist with time. It looks good and is very handy having it there; I should have done it years ago!
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

      Comment


      • Annular cutters or sheetmetal annular cutters also work great on thin material. But yeah, step drill is the budget way to go.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

        Comment


        • Or clamp the metal between two pieces of wood or MDF and use the S&D drills. Hole saws work well also and you get some 7/8" round aluminum discs as waste instead of piles of swarf.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

          Comment


          • Well my jaw isn't so rigid, and the enamel inserts aren't in very good shape, but some of them are sharp.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

            Comment


            • One of my former coworkers at the refinery has a son in Engineering classes at UTEP. They have been 3D printing some prosthetic assemblies. One of the links apparently wasn’t rigid enough during testing. I made this from an F360 design they had. I took pictures of his laptop screen with my phone. Fortunately my turntable was already mounted and zeroed.
              Click image for larger version

Name:	E82A8A2D-791B-4F0D-9768-59A22A926C5D.jpeg
Views:	263
Size:	1.61 MB
ID:	1905241
              Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
              9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

              Comment


              • Finally got around to making this motor mount for the yarn winder I've been building for the wife for the past year........Didn't put a lot of effort into making it "pretty", just wanted fast and functional. It's the LAST big part (except for the electronics....) I need to make for this thing to get it off my nag list . It's a wiper motor from a pontiac G6.



                Comment


                • Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3122.JPG
Views:	227
Size:	383.6 KB
ID:	1905426 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3123.JPG
Views:	222
Size:	437.1 KB
ID:	1905427 Not machined today but over the last several months. I had built a 1/3 scale Borg Warner T-5 transmission to go behind my 302 V-8 engine a few years back. With the flathead finished I thought it only proper that I build one for it. A friend of my son has a number of flathead powered cars and trucks and many spare parts lying about. My son contacted him and he lent me a 1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission to measure. I also found a lot of information on the Van Pelt flathead website. With pictures and dimensions in hand I drew a set of drawings and scaled it to 1/3rd. The case, tailshaft, input housing and side cover are made from 6061 aluminum. The shafts are W-1 drill rod. All the gears are 1144 Stressproof steel. When I built the T-5 I had just learned to make helical gears in my shop and wasn't too sure about the outcome so I made them as spur gears. With quite a few helical gears under my belt for this trans I decided to go for it and make them all helicals. The spline shaft and spline bushing were sourced from Stock Drive Products.
                  gbritnell
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • Here's the final batch of pictures for the Ford 3 speed manual transmission
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • Although the finished transmission looks fairly simple at first glance there was a lot of time put into machining the case. The base radii over the mainshaft was simple enough but the enlarged conical radius took quite a bit of time to blend into the existing cuts. I made adapters to hold the case in my dividing head. I cut the radii over the mainshaft area which included stepping over a round boss extending from the rear mounting flange. With the conical radius I had to step around both the filler plug and drain plug. Once all the stepping-off was complete I spent many hours burring, filing and polishing the case.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • dang. Just dang.

                        Comment


                        • -------------Mr.Britnell for President-----------

                          Comment


                          • Well, sir, you have more patients than 9999999% of the rest of us and maybe the world. Your attention to detail and machining is far above any thing I would ever hope to have. I assume you did this without a CNC mill. I take my hat off to you. BIG time. Way back in my early days I had a 1953 Ford Pickup and know I had the transmission out and in my hands, but I will have to take your view of what it looked like.
                            _____________________________________________

                            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                            Oregon Coast

                            Comment


                            • I believe Mr Britnell uses a round column mill.

                              So much for the tool snobs who do not think anything useful can be done with one.... assuming it has not yet been upgraded.
                              1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                                dang. Just dang.
                                X 2!
                                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X