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  • Thanks for all the help, Bented.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • Bented Ah, I see, cheers. I try hard not to need my steady as it's a pain to mount. Still haven't got round to finishing the roller fingers for it to be honest.

      The Metal Butcher Ok. The first pics you posted were of a couple of bits of tube pressed together. You might have mentioned what complexities lay beneath the surface! Impressive stuff. Don't blame you only getting one at $15 a pop.

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      • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
        The Metal Butcher Ok. The first pics you posted were of a couple of bits of tube pressed together. You might have mentioned what complexities lay beneath the surface! Impressive stuff. Don't blame you only getting one at $15 a pop.
        Fair enough. I don't want to clog this thread with my senior design project stuff. I may post separately about it if we get done and it's worth half a crap.

        Some parts of it were machined by others under my supervision, so I don't want to take credit for those.

        The shaft is here.

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        There's the inner tube that the bearings go into. Nothing else is anything to write home about. Just a bunch of tubes that have been coped basically. Getting some pieces waterjet soon, then I'll have to contend with trying to get all this welded together on a 1970s Tig welder.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

        Comment


        • I personally wouldn't consider that clog at all - but there's definitely an argument that it deserves its own thread. You make the assumption that it's fairly basic stuff and nothing to write home about - and that may be true for some, but I've not got much of a clue so it's all interesting when it comes to practical applications of things or how to solve a particular setup problem (eg the alignment saddles) or even just ways things ought to be done if being done by someone with a clue. A lot of you guys (and girls) are based in the US and tend to dismissively say "Oh well you'd have learned that in shop class". In the UK, most of us didn't get that - at least in my generation that I'm aware of - so learning through osmosis is kind of my shop class substitute.

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          • Restoring an old Jointer, was missing a handle, one on left is original, I have 2 of these Jointers. Click image for larger version

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            Beaver County Alberta Canada

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            • Nice Redlee.

              Does it count as machining if I didn't hand-crank a machine myself?!
              Designed these and printed them in PETG:



              This is with the supports still attached - had to do them manually as if there were supports in the threads (1.5" OD, left hand thread, 5 tpi, square root and round crest) it wouldn't have been possible to get it out. I don't have the luxury of soluble support material with a single extruder unfortunatly.



              And installed. Another length of hose screws into the right hand side and then I can just connect the shop vac to the end of that.



              The original fittings were polypropylene (marked PP, assume that's what it stands for) but the retention lugs were really anaemic and snapped off easily. I've increased the size on these quite a bit. Also, the outlet was an unhelpful size compared to the hose I'm using. Hopefully this should let me have both connected with a reasonably equal share of the extraction between them.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                Nice Redlee.

                Does it count as machining if I didn't hand-crank a machine myself?!
                Designed these and printed them in PETG:



                This is with the supports still attached - had to do them manually as if there were supports in the threads (1.5" OD, left hand thread, 5 tpi, square root and round crest) it wouldn't have been possible to get it out. I don't have the luxury of soluble support material with a single extruder unfortunatly.



                And installed. Another length of hose screws into the right hand side and then I can just connect the shop vac to the end of that.



                The original fittings were polypropylene (marked PP, assume that's what it stands for) but the retention lugs were really anaemic and snapped off easily. I've increased the size on these quite a bit. Also, the outlet was an unhelpful size compared to the hose I'm using. Hopefully this should let me have both connected with a reasonably equal share of the extraction between them.
                You can use some aluminium tape on the impact area to protect the initial impact
                Helder Ferreira
                Setubal, Portugal

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                • Originally posted by Noitoen View Post

                  You can use some aluminium tape on the impact area to protect the initial impact
                  Interesting idea. You mean on the inside wall where the grinding debris hits the bend?

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                  • Nice job on the shrouds. As I'm starting to get back into woodworking, I'll by using my 3d printer more and more to make custom dust collection solutions. I find myself not as tolerant to wood dust as I used to be. IMO it's a great use for a 3d printer, well done. Hopefully they hold up to the sparks. If not, you can print more, or incorporate some metal in the blast zone with a 2pc design, or try the good tape idea above.

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                    • Cheers. I suspect they'll do ok as I don't do very much grinding. Some of that may have been because the grinder was very awkward to get to previuosly - one wheel was just about accessible either side of that vertical strut you can see behind it. I still need to get round to making a table that (from left wheel to right) doesn't suck and isn't broken. Need to find something suitable as a quench pot that won't spill as soon as I pull out the grinder shelf too.

                      The 3D printer is good for prototyping too. I've got the second of a pair of soft jaws for my vise on the go now. I first printed a 5mm thick cross-section to check that it would fit the jaw (it wraps round so none of those cursed magnets are necessary) and that showed that I didn't have the clearance where some of the casting wasn't flat (by design) where you couldn't see it. Again, we'll have to see how PETG with a ridiculous 70% infill holds up as soft jaws.

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                      • Click image for larger version

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ID:	1930572 The Engineering students are coming up with some off the wall stuff for me to make. Today’s exercise was an aluminum manifold with a 1-5/16 16tpi internal thread to 2.25 deep. ???
                        I made a fit plug, measured over wires. Then used this, new to me, internal insert type threading bar. The thread has the typical single phase motor pattern in Click image for larger version

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                        Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                        9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                        • Finishing the ID and OD of split bronze bearings, I face the stock to length and rough turn to .075" from the finish diameters, the slot is then cut in a mill where it springs open a bit.
                          The finished OD dimension is 7.000-6.999" and the ID is 5.887-5.882"
                          The only way to hold them is clamping it to a fixture, this is 1 hour of spindle time and 2 hours of screwing around with the rude clamping and indicating. We only make a dozen or so per year so never spent the time making a more elegant clamping system.


                          While doing the above started another lathe running a steel V-roller, 4" diameter tapering to 2" then back to 4" X 10" long, this took several hours but ran mostly unattended.

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                          • Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
                            The thread has the typical single phase motor pattern
                            I find it unlikely that single phase power is the root cause of that chatter.
                            Given the correct cutting conditions a 3 phase machine will do the same all day long.

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                            • Bented , like so?

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                              It worked decently. Tripped me up a bit dialing it in as the tube wasn't round. I may have accidentally mushed it a bit when sawing.

                              I chopped the tube down the requisite amount. Then I turned the ruined metal off my plug to save it. Decided not to bore it out this time, and just to shrink fit into the raw diameter. Measured in 4 placed front, 90 degrees, rear, 90 degrees, averaged them, added my 3.5 thou press fit, and got an even 2.75" for the plug. I made a tool to prevent me from jamming it in too far, which really was essential now that there was no shoulder.

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                              This time my friend and I heated much more slowly and logically. For one I had my 250 degree temp crayon which worked beautifully. I'm gonna have to get a set of those, that thing works way too good! Secondly, I set some spring calipers to my desired clearance dimension. While my friend was heating with the lathe running slow, I'd stick the calipers in periodically to check the size. If they drug in the bore, it was still undersized. When the drag started to become very light, it was ready. Jammed the plug in there like a high schooler on prom night and it was done! No issues this time. Let it cool and turned the excess off and there is only the faintest of lines visible between the two pieces. I'm pretty happy. Here's to hoping I don't destroy it trying to weld it to 1/2" plate.

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                              PS, here's how it goes together.

                              For a standard assembly, the front tube is slid over the 2 3/4" tube and secured with a pin. That is supposed to be done quickly, so simplicity was key. Only about 7-10 thou of clearance, so hopefully it doesn't fill up with sand or get dinged in use. I'll have to keep a file close by.

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                              Then for further disassembly, the bearing locknut can be removed and the inner tube slid off. That is as far as one can go without pressing or heating things.

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                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Bented View Post

                                I find it unlikely that single phase power is the root cause of that chatter.
                                Given the correct cutting conditions a 3 phase machine will do the same all day long.
                                While it is possible that you are correct, look at the nice nearly perfect rows of marks. If it is what it looks like in the pic, there was something precisely timed making that happen, and the line frequency is a good guess. Exactly "X" number of chatter marks per rotation.

                                It's for sure that the single phase COULD do that, even though there is a fair bit of stickout on that bar, and the topping insert has a long cutting edge, both chatter producers. But it would surprise heck out of me if a plain old random chatter pattern was that perfect.

                                There is a coincidence at work, since the frequency of chatter had to be perfect relative to the rotation in order to make the straight rows, but that's no more odd for a "random chatter" than for line frequency.
                                2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan


                                It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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