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  • Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
    Oil with sulfur content works great. Old disgusting Diesel sump oil is pretty good for dark black.
    Concur.
    Have found nothing better.

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    • I have a 1930's book that describes adding sulfur to oil for blackening. Literally melting it and stirring it into hot oil.

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      • Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
        I have a 1930's book that describes adding sulfur to oil for blackening. Literally melting it and stirring it into hot oil.
        Decades ago along side of a clover leaf interchange I found a (roughly) 50 lb. bag of sulphur that must have slid off a trailer when the trucker went around the curve a little too fast. I never had a use for it...until now.
        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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        • Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
          I have a 1930's book that describes adding sulfur to oil for blackening. Literally melting it and stirring it into hot oil.
          I have a small amount of sulphur on hand. Does the book mention proportions?

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          • Does the book mention a good divorce lawyer for if you're caught using the oven to heat the metal and then getting used diesel oil on the kitchen floor?!

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            • Originally posted by cameron View Post
              I have a small amount of sulphur on hand. Does the book mention proportions?
              I'll have to dig it out... irrc it was only a couple of tablespoons mixed with a cup of oil then painted on. The book is at a buddies. I need to get it back and scan it.

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              • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb
                Just don't bother with any DD 2-cycle oil as they usually get very low sulfur, or maybe it was ash content. I think it was very low ash. Delo 100
                DD 2 cycle oil is specified to be low ash and single weight only. Due to the intake port/piston ring interface shearing the polymers that allow multi-grade oils to exist.

                The question of using old diesel engine oil brings up the question of if this practice is still relevant.
                Sulfur content of diesel fuel used to hover around 2000 ppm. The use of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel with a sulfur content of 15 ppm has been in use for almost two decades.
                One has to wonder, is it the sulfur content that gives the rich black color or is it perhaps the suspended microscopic soot?
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • Hey... I said OLD oil! .. the container that's been in the garage for 40 years 'cos your dad wouldn't throw anything useful out. yes, a lot lower sulfur in diesel than there used to be.

                  I'm pretty sure the "black" I referred to is at least partially from an iron/sulfur compound, hence the adding of sulfur to oil to make it. Need to get that book back.

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                  • Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                    Hey... I said OLD oil! .. the container that's been in the garage for 40 years 'cos your dad wouldn't throw anything useful out. yes, a lot lower sulfur in diesel than there used to be.

                    I'm pretty sure the "black" I referred to is at least partially from an iron/sulfur compound, hence the adding of sulfur to oil to make it. Need to get that book back.
                    I thought that stuff would've ended up on the driveway to hold the dust down years ago.
                    Oops, I didn't say that.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • Originally posted by Willy View Post
                      DD 2 cycle oil is specified to be low ash and single weight only. Due to the intake port/piston ring interface shearing the polymers that allow multi-grade oils to exist.

                      The question of using old diesel engine oil brings up the question of if this practice is still relevant.
                      Sulfur content of diesel fuel used to hover around 2000 ppm. The use of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel with a sulfur content of 15 ppm has been in use for almost two decades.
                      One has to wonder, is it the sulfur content that gives the rich black color or is it perhaps the suspended microscopic soot?
                      Yes, because i still use "used out of the sump mineral diesel oil" in 2018. I specifically use a straight 30W mineral oil designed for big Kubota single cylinder motors. Oil changed once every season. Perfect results every time.
                      On the other hand, i've had very inconsistent or even poor results using quality mineral m/c oil and high quality semi-synthetic Mobil oil designed for modern commonrail diesels used in my Toyota pickup truck.

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                      • I got to knurl the handle on Mjِlner today...
                        If the women don't find ya handsome, they should at least find ya handy

                        https://www.facebook.com/WDHSTechClub

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                        • Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                          Hey... I said OLD oil! .. the container that's been in the garage for 40 years 'cos your dad wouldn't throw anything useful out. yes, a lot lower sulfur in diesel than there used to be.

                          I'm pretty sure the "black" I referred to is at least partially from an iron/sulfur compound, hence the adding of sulfur to oil to make it. Need to get that book back.
                          The black I got was with old oil that IIRC, came out of an old Briggs engine I started working on before it got cold out in the shed (and before I got too busy). Cannot testify as to the sulfur content, other than mentioning that it has no particular sulfur smell, nothing like the sulfured "Harvey's" as used for pipe threading, etc. The AGE of the oil is in excess of 30 years, as that engine was in my wife's grandfather's garage unused for the 32 years we have been married, and probably for a decade or two earlier than that.

                          Sulfur may give a dark color at a lower temperature, I have not tried it. I like the black I got, it seems durable. But if dunked at less than a gray temper color, it did not get the darkness I wanted.

                          As for machining.... not much, but I did get in a scraping job to be done. Saddle and knee of a Burke Millrite. Dang that knee is a heavy thang. Now I wish I already had the planned overhead chain hoist on a Unistrut track that would go right over that bench.

                          And I discovered that I had done something really clever with the keys to a set of cabinets I wanted to get into today.... I had put them into a drawer while we were out of town (they are usually in the doors), and I looked through all the drawers around, without finding them.... very irritating. Cabinet has expensive indicators and scraping references in it among other things.... and I wanted one to do a survey of the Millrite parts.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 03-23-2018, 11:50 PM.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • Atlas/Craftsman Compound Rest

                            For the past few months of using the new QCTP, I couldn't keep it from moving on heavy (to me) cuts. I checked the bottom of the QC for flatness then checked the compound. Oh my! I don't know if it had a crown due to being filed over the past 79 years or from the lantern post being tightened by a gorilla. A straight edge had a noticeable rock so off it came. A quick trip to the mill with a 2.5" face cutter and I had it fixed in minutes. It took about .010" to get it flat. Works great now! It sure is nice to have a mill.

                            Last edited by CCWKen; 03-26-2018, 08:35 AM. Reason: Correction

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                            • Bite me! I don't have a mill,,,,yet
                              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                              Lewis Grizzard

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                              • Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                                Bite me! I don't have a mill,,,,yet

                                Your lathe is a sideways mill, it just doesn't know it.

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