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    Bented
    Senior Member

  • Bented
    replied
    Cast iron rollers for an unknown use.
    8" OD X 4" long with 1.437" +.005 -.000 through bores, cast iron is nasty as it leaves small chips and dust everywhere, flood coolant helps keep the dust and chips in the enclosure.

    As side note this machine has a 4 position horizontal automatic tool turret (never buy a CNC lathe with a horizontal turret) and crashed a 1/2" twist drill into the sliding door, no harm done fortunately.
    Bented
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Bented; 10-21-2021, 08:28 PM.

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  • Tim Clarke
    Senior Member

  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    Oops. I made some, not one. Must have fat fingered it yet again

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  • Tim Clarke
    Senior Member

  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    Made one 10-32 hex head capscrews for my Stuart Beam project. Click image for larger version

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  • Cenedd
    Senior Member

  • Cenedd
    replied
    Thought you'd missed with the boring bar until I spotted the ganged tooling - I blame it on the small screen When that boring bar did hit though, I thought you'd got a lathe to dial-up to the internet!

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  • Bented
    Senior Member

  • Bented
    replied
    Some kind of fittings, 1 1/8" brass hex stock.
    Face, turn OD, drill and bore to .906" X .700 deep, thread 1 1/8-24 and part off. 175 parts.

    5 tools in a 4 position turret, the drill and boring bar are ganged in 1 holder. If my employer were to invest in suitable tooling I could gang all 5 tools in 1 turret position for such a small part with no tool indexing.
    https://bented.smugmug.com/My-First-Gallery/i-jH6Dp5T/A

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  • Cenedd
    Senior Member

  • Cenedd
    replied
    Got round to starting a project for a friend. He restores vintage BMX bikes and wanted a peg (sticks out of wheel axle to stand on) copied. I've got another to do but will hold off until the first one has been checked - this is something a number of hours drive away that I've never seen the original, it's only off the numbers. Made in aluminium as per the original but it's strictly for show (not being ridden) anyway.





    Then I 3D printed these so I could sandwhich it in a length of PVC tube for posting. Overkill...but one I'd got the idea in my head




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  • Bented
    Senior Member

  • Bented
    replied
    They did not confirm the thread until today, it is 1/2 NPT.

    If anyone is interested this is the simple 1 page program for the thread, the first 6 events turn the major diameter, easy as pie.

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  • Bented
    Senior Member

  • Bented
    replied
    Began a job this afternoon, 316 SS centerless ground to .875 +-.001" stock.

    One callout is incomplete, 1/2 pipe thread. Have never seen this before, normally it is spelled out, 1/2 NPT, 1/2 NPS, 1/2 BPT, etc.
    Granted, this company has been making their machines since 1946 so the drawing may be 50 years old (-:

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  • aalbert
    Junior Member

  • aalbert
    replied
    Made an Arca-Swiss mount for a friend today on my LMS-3990... Allows him to mount his photo tripod to his Q-Fix rifle. Fortunately the rifles manufacturer shows the dimensions etc. required to mount to their rail interface.

    Attached Files

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  • Cenedd
    Senior Member

  • Cenedd
    replied
    repoman
    Junior Member
    repoman I can be of absolutely no help as I know nothing about any of that....but it's interesting Love the neck, the paintwork and the trem. Not so sure about the pickup cover aesthetic but my opinion is probably worth about as much as my ability to play....and letting me near strings is probably banned by the Geneva Convention! Unusual to see it (neck and pick-ups) set up as sort of surface-mount rather than recessed in but looks like you've been able to make the body thinner (and hence lighter) as a result. I can see the trem assembly still has layout on it so isn't done yet; are you thinking of something like a tumbler to soften the edges?

    The Metal Butcher
    Senior Member
    The Metal Butcher We know you love the graphite Have you thought about sneezing at paper and selling it as modern art?!
    "I probably shouldn't say" The best kind of NDAs are the ones you're not even allowed to tell people you've signed!

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  • The Metal Butcher
    Senior Member

  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    I machined two new materials the other day. One being pure tungsten. Actually pretty easy to turn with carbide, about like cast iron. The other, I probably shouldn't say, but it was much tougher. More ductile, yet harder. About 1300 Vickers before turning, 900 after.

    But now... back to the graphite.

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  • repoman
    Junior Member

  • repoman
    replied
    Just getting started in machining so my stuff is pretty simple. I'm currently working on a rubber/neoprene/urethane (Guerin process) forming die to press 0.015 - 0.020" brass or nickel silver into electric guitar pickup covers. Rich C was extremely kind and gave me a copy of the Die Design Handbook which has been coming in pretty helpful.
    Right now I'm just constructing ram plate, bed plate, and rubber retainer. Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0343.jpg Views:	0 Size:	168.5 KB ID:	1959085

    This box with be the Neoprene/Urethane pad retainer, it will be welded to another plate that I can bolt to the bed plate (so I can change it out if I need to IE different die types in the ram/bedplate). It's 1/4 hotrolled, I think this will be enough to contain the pressure but I might weld some additional angle on the sides, I used probably six or seven 1/16th filler rods on these joints. Strongest way to weld a box? Dunno...these were how pad retaining boxes were constructed from the photos I could find though.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0344.jpg Views:	0 Size:	148.6 KB ID:	1959086

    I've never welded something so square before...not that it matters (I don't think anyways) since the diagram of the rubber press die in the handbook shows 1/8th gap between the outside of the retainer and the punch platen.

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    Ram and bed plate, it's only 3/8th hot rolled, but the sheet metal I'm pressing is pretty thin.

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    Here's how it will sort of look (it's upside down here from how it will eventually function), there will be a platen on the top with a interchangeable punch die, then the sheet with lay on it and get smushed, hopefully it will form better than my previous attempts which used aluminum epoxy casting to form a rudimentary draw die. I've never done anything with shafts and bushings, I figured these oilite bushings and ground linear motion shafts would be good, the go down silky smooth but the bind on the way back up so I'm dealing with how to solve that. The holes were bored 0.001"under so they might be too tight when pressed in, I'm going to use a reamer on them next, if that doesn't work not sure what to do...maybe make one bushing oblong? I think I've seen that done before, these don't need to be super precise how I imagine it. The bed plate must be too thin and the shafts don't have enough material to stay perfectly straight and splay out.
    The depth of the retainer and how much rubber material to go in there is complete guess work, I could not find any information on how to determine depth, the retainer is supposed to travel at least 1/4 below the platen, the punch will be about 0.600" so I'm planning on putting about 3" of rubber in there with 1.5 inch clearance on the sides of the punch.

    Also need to find an appropriate rubber material and appropriate durometer, solid urethane is really expensive and the only place on Ebay that has some in small order seems to be 70A durometer which is probably too stiff for this little setup...I'm going to try 50A neoprene from Grainger, it's a little less expensive and was used in these sorts of dies back in the 40s and 50s.


    Click image for larger version  Name:	GCH9Qkq.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	262.5 KB ID:	1959089

    Here is a prototype electric guitar I'm making these for, you can see the test pickup cover there in brass pressed with the aluminum epoxy cast die method. The guitar actually has an aluminum neck that dovetails into an aluminum spine in the body (this is what got me into machining).
    repoman
    Junior Member
    Last edited by repoman; 08-27-2021, 11:21 PM.

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  • RB211
    Senior Member

  • RB211
    replied
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    Attached Files

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  • GeoBruin
    Junior Member

  • GeoBruin
    replied
    I'm making some trolleys/end trucks for my bridge crane build. I'm using the wheels from some existing trolleys but the bolts/pins that hold them are a press fit into the sides of the trolley and they're an oddball size, so I'm getting as close as I can with a mag drill and then boring them to fit in the mill.
    Attached Files

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  • J Tiers
    Senior Member

  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by 90LX_Notch View Post
    Bored the Top Plate and bottom of the block for my build of George Britnell’s 4 cylinder o.h.v. engine. The block was clamped to the faceplate of the Rivett 608.

    -Bob
    Very nice.....! I like your choice of lathe.... still working on rebuilding mine, at least when I am home.

    Getting the crank spaces done so cleanly is very good work.

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