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Made a longer/extened tail-stock quill

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  • Made a longer/extened tail-stock quill

    I wrote up alittle something here, has lots of pictures and most of the process that i did:
    http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com/m...ailstock-quill

    Some time down the road, when ever i get a tool post grinder (or make up something) i plan on making another one of these, the end which slides in and out of the tail stock housing really needs to be finished grinded and not turned (to make sure its truly round), but i guess we all make do with what we have (or dont have). So with that in mind, if you have any suggestions on how you would go about making this, i would love to here.

    Heres the end result...
    ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
    http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
    https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

  • #2
    Reworking my tailstock is something I have had on the cards for a long while, unfortunately work gets in the way of projects.
    I'll be honest and never considered extending it like that. I tend to use extended holders for things like centre drills.



    However some while ago from a Clausing Design that i think was forwarded by Lazlo I modified a Myford Super 7 tailstock into a combined lever and handwheel feed which increased the stroke to nearly double.



    Ignore the crude lever and the state of the tailstock, this was just a concept and the tailstock was bought cheap off a scrapper as I don't own a S7.



    The Myford does have a decent travel for a lathe this size at 3 3/4" but the addition of the lever feed means you can increase this to a maximum of 6" and still be filly supported thru the body.



    This is what I'm hoping to do to mine. The only new parts needed are plain turning or stock diameters, no precision turning as the original barrel is used, which in my case is still good and it can go back to original design with no problems.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      John,

      I can see an advantage to the OP's design over John's in that it doesn't need any dismantling of the tailstock in order to be used. However, I hope the OP will forgive me if I ask John to clarify a couple of points on his rather elegant design. I presume you still need to turn a Morse taper in the business end of the barrel. And what does the handwheel do?

      George

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      • #4
        George,
        That's the beauty of the Clausing design in that you use the existing barrel, not having to do any accurate machining, the taper is already in the barrel.

        How it works is, if the orange locking lever is locked the handwheel extents the original barrel the original stroke on it's original screw.

        If it's unlocked the lever can extend the barrel as a pure lever feed tailstock, using both allows you the full 6"

        You can use them together in that you unlock the orange lever, move the lever feed so the tool is toucking the work, lock the orange lever and use the hand wheel to feed in. If nessesary you cam unlock and clear chips with the lever, push back in, relock and carry on using the handwheel.
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by iMisspell View Post
          Some time down the road, when ever i get a tool post grinder (or make up something) i plan on making another one of these, the end which slides in and out of the tail stock housing really needs to be finished grinded and not turned (to make sure its truly round), but i guess we all make do with what we have (or dont have). So with that in mind...
          Perhaps a simple split-sleeve lap? My understanding is that even if neither the original workpiece nor the lap start off as perfectly round, the process itself will continuously work both toward that end. So maybe a split, brass, external collar and 'clover' is all that is needed to geometrically finish the quill...

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          • #6

            Good, bad... easy, difficult?

            --Doozer
            Last edited by Doozer; 04-22-2013, 12:54 PM.
            DZER

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm a dim one, so keep that in mind: John, using your example how do you attach the quill extension? I'm also having trouble visualizing the use of the original screw with a lengthened quill unless you thread the extension to fit. Thanks.

              Comment


              • #8
                @ John...
                Boy that retractable lever would have been a dream while drilling the 5/8 x 8" deep through hold in the extension i made.
                Funny you brought up the center drill extension you made... Acouple weekends ago i made up a small batch of MT3 blanks, they all are alittle long (maybe 1.5-2") just because im not sure what i will be doing with them all, never thought about making them extra long, nice idea.


                Originally posted by Arthur.Marks View Post
                Perhaps a simple split-sleeve lap? My understanding is that even if neither the original workpiece nor the lap start off as perfectly round, the process itself will continuously work both toward that end. So maybe a split, brass, external collar and 'clover' is all that is needed to geometrically finish the quill...
                Humm... i like that. Maybe i could toss in a milling boring head in the chuck, bore out the face of the tail-stocks housing alittle bit, just checked and i could go .312 deep with out causeing any problems with the locking screw on the bottom.
                Thanks for the idea... gonna look into it more.

                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                Good, bad... easy, difficult?
                I personaly dont like them... Do have one and have used it form time to time, but theres too much flex and its not very ridged in my opion...

                As with other here, i was alittle confuded on how that lever worked in the images John posted, did alittle searching and found the following:
                http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Claus...Attachment.pdf
                http://operatormanuals.tpub.com/TM-9...5-14-P0059.htm

                Is that what you have John ?
                In theory it seams great.. how does it work in the real world ?
                Something to consider if i ever make a second quill.
                ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
                http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
                https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

                Comment


                • #9
                  iMiss,
                  Those pdf's are what Lazlo came up with some while ago. Must admit I'd never seen one given that Clausing is the US arm of Colchester.

                  They use an extension for the quill but a new and longer thread. I wanted something simpler than that as the Myford has a triple start left hand thread in the tailstock and making one of these would not be easy.

                  Unfortunately that tailstock is with a friend of mine on the other side of the country and other than the photo's I have posted is all the details I have, no drawings were made, it was a seats of the pants joby so just done a quick CAD [ Clown assisted Drawing ] drawing.



                  Top drawing is standard Myford. Flanged screw and thrust bearing held by a screw in retainer with hand wheel secured by a nut on the end.

                  In the modified one the original part, barrel, nut and screw is left as is.
                  Two new parts are needed, an inner extension and outer extension. Inner extension is just a length of rod that extends the screw, one end is same as original, other end is internal to screw onto the hand wheel thread and is loctited or pinned.
                  This is the only modification that is permanent to the tailstock.

                  The outer extension is top hatted so the thrust can be moved to the hand wheel end. the LH end just butts up to the original barrel, it's not fastened in any way and this is what allows either / or to work. Where it runs thru the new clamp bracket it needs a long keyway and key to top it rotating.
                  The split is to allow the clamp bracket to grip the outer extension when the orange handle is applied.
                  The lever is anchored onto the new clamp bracket as in the picture.

                  In use if you release the locking handle and work the lever the outer extension pushes the barrel is it closed, if it's part way out the screw pushes the nut but everything moves together.

                  If the locking handle is tightened the lever feed can't move so if the hand wheel is operated the inner extension turns the screw and the barrel extends, just like normal but it can be part or fully extended first by the lever.
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Good drawings, John. I got it now. Thanks

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