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    I've been slowly getting back into machining as a hobby. I just didn't have time and money due to my real life situation, but occasionally check local adds and browse ebay, and sometimes buy some stuff. The holders say 'ss' on them, does that mean stainless steel? My tenths micrometer measures less than 0.1 thousandths difference throughout, landing exactly on the mark. The surface finish on the endmill is probably made as smooth as possible for better clamping in hydraulic chucks.



    Next, maybe I can find a 1/2" collet and a 1/2" carbide endmill of 12" length -- not that I need it right now, but it would complete my collection of boring endmills.

    There's a guy 2 hours from me selling some blocks of exotic materials - like 3"x4"x3" blocks of HSS and other blocks of this size but of very hard materials from the dye industry. I know he's gotta have some nice tooling is he's machining that stuff...

    On the topic of smooth finishes, they are also important for chip evacuation. OSG's Helios drills are innovative in that they have a smooth finish, to allow x20D drilling depths:
    Last edited by Elninio; 05-18-2013, 03:30 AM.

  • #2
    S.S. = Straight Shank

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    • #3
      Helios deep drilling owes as much to its more aggressive spiral and deep groove as it does to fine finish. Looks like a wood cutting auger bit from that POV, get those chips out of the hole!
      Steve

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      • #4
        Yep - that's a parabolic flute drill, designed for deep holes because they get the chips out of the hole a lot better than regular twist drills.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
          Yep - that's a parabolic flute drill, designed for deep holes because they get the chips out of the hole a lot better than regular twist drills.
          I've see stub lenght carbide insert drills with almost no helix, what conditions determine what helix angle is needed? For example, machining of carbon fiber requires two opposing helices to prevent delamination.

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