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OT: Is there a problem with your steel manufactorium?

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  • OT: Is there a problem with your steel manufactorium?

    What's "oops" in Polish?

    http://www.wimp.com/polishplant/

  • #2
    Huh....Steel mills dangerous?Who knew?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      Cold steel

      Been there-done that with cold steel, just as exciting, but never again-------

      http://youtu.be/lkqpEXy0frE

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      • #4
        I thought the hot stuff was pretty exciting, but damn that's an awful lot of cold pipe to dodge!
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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        • #5
          lol! I was just thinking about that oil rig.. "uh guys... I don't think your done running yet.. if that pipe is comming outta there that fast.. and is that heavy... then uh, I think the main problem is not the pipe comming out, but whats comming out when the pipe gets outta the way.."
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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          • #6
            That makes for a bad day! Pretty cool to watch, though Looks soft and light until you hear it the floor with a thud.

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            • #7
              More like what's "Oh sh!t" in Polish. I'm also amazed they just stood there and watched it all the while they were close enough to get hurt!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Willy View Post
                I thought the hot stuff was pretty exciting, but damn that's an awful lot of cold pipe to dodge!
                But no one was dodging or running or even walking away. They even walked toward it after it just after it hit the floor. Duhhh??? Even if the rolls were shut down, some jackass might try to restart it.

                I wonder if it happens every day and boredom has just set in. Someone is going to get a really "hot" necktie some day.
                Paul A.

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                • #9
                  I remember my father telling me about something like that happening in a paper mill he ran back in the 1950s-60s The paper is running through the calendar rolls at something like 10 feet per second when something misfeeds, and all these papermaker guys are running around with razor-sharp knives (paper is very abrasive to an edge, so the knives need to be sharp and hard), trying to hack off the bitter end ZORRO! to prevent it all from bunching up and lifting these gigantic and HOT steel cylinders off their axles and turning the whole paper mill into something out of the Johnstown Flood...yikes
                  Last edited by Krunch; 05-21-2013, 06:59 PM.

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                  • #10
                    That big concrete block that the "hot" steel hit is there just to stop a runaway, shown in the vid. It isn't that unusual (not an everyday thing though) for that to happen, that's why no one was running away, they are used to it.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                    • #11
                      That knot is easier to tie than to undo.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        But no one was dodging or running or even walking away. They even walked toward it after it just after it hit the floor. Duhhh??? Even if the rolls were shut down, some jackass might try to restart it.

                        I wonder if it happens every day and boredom has just set in. Someone is going to get a really "hot" necktie some day.
                        Maybe not,years ago on a jobsite I was welding under some scaffolding,about ten stories worth when I heard a familiar sound.
                        Bang!.......Bang!..Bang...........Bang......splat! And a 36" Stilsen wrench appeared in the mud about 20 feet from me.

                        In that situation you have a hard hat on,you don't dare look up and which way do you run?Twenty feet to thr right and I would have been hit,standing still it missed me.My money is on the rolling mill crew keeping their heads.Running might have meant running into a hot ribbon of steel instead of avoiding it.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tyrone shewlaces View Post
                          That knot is easier to tie than to undo.
                          At then end of the video it looks like the one guy is grabbing up an Oxygen lance
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            The mill was already stopping as soon as the roll tension was lost, the plc's were shutting down the DC drives, they were walking towards it because they knew this, thereby also knew how long the cobble was going to be as it relates to the stand (roll) position, and the bloom/billot/slab size, from memory they tend to be just under 10m, which is the length of their walking beam reheat furnace, cobbles are frequent as the feedstock is narrow on that kind of mill, sheet mills fare better but are much more dangerous as the exit speed can exceed 60km/h, no one is allowed around the mill floor when rolling on the 7 stand mill where I work, far too dangerous, even the reversing roughing mill and coil box is considered off limits, the reason you grab the oxy lance as fast as you can is to cut the cobble while hot, you don't have to arse about with lance lighters or cardboard tubes and cutting torches, they use a 3/8" lance over there with a contessi lance holder, if your quick you can get in and cut the cobble out and be rolling in under 10 mins.if your slow and it cools you can be fighting it for hours as you have to put the mill into cold strand removal mode which really bumps the pressure up to maximum as you have to deal with cold steel, if its electrical steel it's worse as it will shatter like toughened glass.
                            Leaving a cobble cool in the mill knackers rolls too, the through roll cooling system can cope when the contact is intermittent but if static the rolls bend and distort to the point of being ruined fairly quickly, most mills will do a roll change after a cobble as a matter of course, a full change takes about 20 mins
                            It was a bit cleaner when I went there as they had painted everything! But we still ended up wearing the same orange and brown overalls as them because some numpty in the supply department liked Hollands football kit colours, seems Cosco and corus had a lot in common.
                            Mark

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                            • #15
                              I read a book a while back, American Steel by Richard Preston, which described the process Nucor went through to bring up their Crawfordsville IN continuous casting plant. While doing the fine tuning of the caster, occasionally the hot metal would break out of the slab as it came out of the caster --- spraying molten steel all over the place. Fun stuff...

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