Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thoughts on an indexing head on Australian ebay

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thoughts on an indexing head on Australian ebay

    Guys, this indexing head is of interest mainly because its very local. I don't have an immediate need for an indexing head and don't know much about them, but as I say its local.
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/indexing-...304fdbd&_uhb=1

    Does anyone recognise the head, know what make it is?

    Am I correct in assuming that its a genuine universal indexing head, ie it can be timed to the table travel, even though it seems to be missing the required stack of gears.

    On the surface of it one of these new offerings would seem to be better value than the ebay item, have I got that right?
    http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Uni...Dividing-Heads

  • #2
    Yeah, by the looks of it this is an actual universal dividing head, i.e. capable of helical milling. So you would have to step up the the $1000 unit at Hare and Forbes (hack, spit) to get the same capability. You may be able to get the gear set at a reasonable price.

    Don't know if that helps you at all in making a decision, but the second hand market for Dividing heads down under is pretty terrible.

    Comment


    • #3
      Can I be the first to draw attention to the key left in the chuck?

      Comment


      • #4
        I think it is way too expensive for what is on offer. No bids yet. Let it drop thru to end of auction; then PM him with $50 offer.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
          I think it is way too expensive for what is on offer. No bids yet. Let it drop thru to end of auction; then PM him with $50 offer.
          Just checked and the Australian and US dollars are essentially on par. $400 A$ is way too much.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
            Can I be the first to draw attention to the key left in the chuck?
            If you can turn the crank fast enough to make that chuck key a hazard I'll buy you a beer.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
              Can I be the first to draw attention to the key left in the chuck?
              If you can turn the crank fast enough to make that chuck key a hazard I'll buy you a beer.

              Comment


              • #8
                It's an Elliott or Victoria (E bought V). more to come if this post works.

                Comment


                • #9
                  More general info on dividing heads.

                  It is an Elliott or Victoria (E bought up V) fitted with the No2 plate having 9 rows. 2 plates achieve the standard 18 circles and 4 more special plates the primes to 100 following normal Machinery Handbook practice. They mixed square and fitted labels as shown so not possible to positively identify from that. The lack of a spindle lock, worm release and direct indexing detent behind the chuck point to the 3 1/2 in model rather than the 4 1/2, 5 or 6 in versions.
                  Worth checking as the smaller unit is highly desirable at only about 30lb instead of 105lb and more suited to a normal Bridgeport and smaller mills. It has a 3MT hole with 1"x 10tpi nose so the chuck is nice to have ready fitted but probably won't transer onto your lathe. The pukka gears are 16DP (same as Boxford backgear) with 3/4" hole but any size that fits will do for differential indexing.
                  There is a nice detent behind the plate to stop it rotating which means that it can also easily be set for compund indexing not that it is really necessary but by drilling a few extra holes in your plate it means you could very easily double or tripple your hole counts using the compound technique to achieve some clock wheel counts.
                  Worth noting that for diff indexing you do NOT need the special set of 11 gears usual with universal heads. Just look at the tables to see the gears suggested and work out the ratio they achieve. Then with modern computing power use a spreadsheet to find a combination of the gears you do have that gives that ratio.
                  Even easier this guy Duncan has a program to do it for you in his hobber calculator.
                  Prices. In UK Universals normally get listed around 250sterling excluding tailstock and gears. Gears ony appear a couple of times a year. Don't know if they sell at that as if listed with a low start they can go for only 150.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bob, I have found that living this side of the globe so few of this sort of thing show up that price is not really a consideration in things like this. If it is what you want and it is of good quality and condition I would say buy it.

                    On the other hand you could choose from Machinery House, pay twice as much and get something new. Personally, I would buy new and be sure of getting a complete tool with at least some prospect of remedy if there is something wrong with it.
                    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 05-22-2013, 05:28 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Baz, that's full ducks guts. Absolutely brilliant, many thanks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a 5" centre height Elliott universal dividing head complete with full set of gears, tailstock, original instruction manual and fitted with a 7 1/2" three jaw chuck with both sets of jaws. I bought this on ebay about 4 years ago for £120, an absolute bargain! I use it on my Bridgeport but have had to rig a 10cwt (1/2 ton) chain hoist above the mill to lift the dividing head on and off, it's also used to handle my 12" rotary table.

                        Malc.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X