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Ot: For Aviation Buffs, Engineers Station on a B36 Bomber

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  • Ot: For Aviation Buffs, Engineers Station on a B36 Bomber

    Can't get the pictures of the plane I got with this to post, but it shows a B36 with SIX reciprocating R-4360s and four J-47 jets to keep an eye on, plus fuel, pressurization, hydraulics, electrical, and other systems. LOTSA clocks!

    Here's the link to the inside view that lets you rotated 360° to see it all.

    http://www.nmusafvirtualtour.com/med...0Engineer.html
    Steve
    NRA Life Member

  • #2
    To be so huge there is very little room in those or any bomber. Still gotta get checked out in a DC3, maybe this year. Since 1935 still flying passengers, cargo & contraband in 3rd world countries. Taildraggers, get off short on grass. I collect "Air Facts" that test flies & reports on '30-'50s planes. One copy is totally on how to fly a Gooney Bird. I've read it 20+ times.
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

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    • #3
      Neat. I like those "self directed" views.


      BTW..... not just contraband.....

      DC-3 was used until recently on regular flights out of Lambert in St Louis. I'd see it headed South in the evening, and no mistaking the sound. I believe it was "JIT" flights delivering auto parts to assembly plants. Flights quit right about the time the auto companies got in big trouble, whether it was that or something else.
      Last edited by J Tiers; 06-03-2013, 01:18 AM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Were there two flight engineers on the B-36? I see two seats. It looks like a mount in the ceiling for what may be a sextant, but really don't see any room for a navigator - wall to wall indicators for the flight engineer(s).

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        • #5
          You'd think it was a nuclear power plant or something-
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            You'd think it was a nuclear power plant or something-
            Well, he was monitoring 10 engines. And heaven only knows how much else. Electrical. Hydraulic. Pneumatic? If you have ever seen one, then you know just how big it is. I forget how many bomb bays it had. And everything HAD to work. Monitoring a nuclear plant may have been simpler.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by darryl View Post
              You'd think it was a nuclear power plant or something-
              A B-36 was used for Atomic-Powered Aircraft testing.....the NB-36H made 21 flights with its test reactor "critical". This was a 1000kw air-cooled reactor, not used to power the aircraft. Highly modified flight engineers station, not to mention the rest of the aircraft with its 6-inch thick plexiglass windshield, 4-ton lead disc shield etc.

              The next proposed step was the X-6 which was based on a B-36 with its six piston and four turbojet engines and a further 4 atomic engines under the fuselage. The standard engines would be used to take-off and land, the atomic engines for rest of flight. This latter aircraft was not completed.

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              • #8
                No leg-room for the poor engineer.
                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                Monarch 10EE 1942

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                • #9
                  That must have been a hell of a panel to wire! Colour blind need not apply!
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    Looks like the Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson. Is that a B-52 out the starboard window?

                    Stu

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by boslab View Post
                      That must have been a hell of a panel to wire! Colour blind need not apply!
                      Mark
                      Many items I have seen/worked on have just numbered wires. A LOT of numbers. It can make the schematic heck to follow, and the wiring worse.

                      Umpty-hundred white wires, with just numbers to distinguish them. Schematic with numbered wires shown entering a bundle, and the bundle shown as one line which you then must follow to find all the places that wire may exit.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        I used to fly Convair 580s, originally CV-440s, made roughly in the same years as the B-36. It's logical, but still delightful, to see many common furnishings, lights, fittings etc.

                        Flylo...if you can fly an Apache and a Stinson you can fly a Dak. I slaved for a DC-3 operator in 1974, doing night freight. Even now whenever I hear a radial engine I go into a coma. The hardest thing about them is climbing up the greasy ladder to add gallons of oil, and to pit up with all that noise for only 130 kts airspeed (PanAm gear doors). Also, try not to be six and a half feet tall...you will never get comfortable.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          Many items I have seen/worked on have just numbered wires.
                          +1. The tanks and other track vehicles I worked on in the early 70s had all white wires with tiny numbers printed on them every few inches.

                          The B-36 was well before this, so don't know if it was the same.
                          For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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                          • #14
                            An old friend of mine was in the Air Force around the time they were flying B-36's. He worked on C-124 "Shakys" too. Whenever the pilot asked the engineer for a status report on the engines, he used to reply, "I got six turnin' and four burning." If I'm not mistaken, the B-36 was one of the few US military aircraft that used avgas burning jet engines.

                            The little Hughes 269a had all white wires, with tiny little numbers every few inches. You almost needed a microscope to do any wiring repairs on one...The Sheriff's Department used to have two of them. (one bought for spare parts). They kept it on a single axle trailer, parked next to the hangar. More than once, the Sheriff's pilot tried to take off without disconnecting the trailer....I seriously doubt if it would have gotten off the ground, though....Carrying the pilot and one fat Deputy, on a hot day, the little thing was sorely pressed to get off of the ground...(The airport here in Kingman is 3300 ft. ASL) The County finally sold the Hughes birds and picked up a couple of Army surplus OH-58a Bell helicopters. That's about the time our pilot stormed into the Sheriff's office, and demanded the Sheriff send him to rescue lift training up-date classes. He probably would have gotten his request, if he hadn't been shouting and beating on the Sheriff's desk. The Sheriff promptly grounded the helicopter, and in a rage, the pilot quit.
                            Last edited by saltmine; 06-03-2013, 12:01 PM.
                            No good deed goes unpunished.

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                            • #15
                              B-36's stayed aloft very long periods. The saying was that the only time they landed was to re-up the crew.

                              Another unusual feature was the wings were so thick that there were access crawlspaces inside the wings that allowed in-flight access to the engines.
                              Milton

                              "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                              "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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