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OT: Ported my FSWizard calc to a platform-independent javascript code. What now?

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  • OT: Ported my FSWizard calc to a platform-independent javascript code. What now?

    Basically its all in the subject.
    For those who don't know the story: I am developing a line of CNC speed and feed calculators.
    I have ported my online version to be able to run on client side without any internet connection.
    I am trying to figure out if packaging it with PhoneGap and putting it out on Google Play for 10$ is a good idea.

    See. When someone extracts javascript he can run it on any platform, plus all the code is out in the open. Which will compete with my HSMAdvisor that I am planning to sell as well.

    Is developing an app in java better?
    How easy is it to rip/patch/reverse engineer a java code?
    FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

  • #2
    I believe I can't use java on iPhone so no.lol! Would like it on my ipad and or phone.

    Comment


    • #3
      Is developing an app in java better?
      How easy is it to rip/patch/reverse engineer a java code?
      No, not in my opinion, using Qt c++ or qml is the way to go for cross platform development, its whats used for VLC, Skype etc...
      Java is no easier nor harder then anything else to crack, use some good obfuscation and carry on. Technical apps like that wont get much attention from hackers anyways...
      Cheers,
      Jon

      Comment


      • #4
        My app is in no way a Skype.
        So, I guess JavaScript will do.
        I will scrable it as much as I can and just put it out there I guess.

        Thanks for replies!
        FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

        Comment


        • #5
          How will you package it for the different platforms? Or is it browser based? I am not sure I understand what you mean when you say
          Ported my FSWizard calc to a platform-independent javascript code
          . What is a platform-independent javascript code? Something that will run in a browser?
          If all your program logic is in Mozilla JavaScript then all the hard work is done for a Qt qml app. Qml uses JavaScript for its program logic, you would just need to whip up a ui and then start packaging it. You could then release it for the new blackberry and playbook, android, ios, mac, windoze, linux, win ce, etc, etc...
          You can even make your ui in photoshop or gimp and then import it into qml, though you can make the ui's so easily I have not tried the importing thing, its very slick and easy to use in my opinion.
          Cheers,
          Jon

          Comment


          • #6
            Its basically a web page with css and html.
            Inbuilt JavaScript functions do all the math and update fields. Nothing fancy.

            Using PhoneGap I can create an apk file for android. I really like the flexibility and versatility of html so I want to use it if I can: what took me 2 weeks to code on vb.net took me just one night to do in JavaScript.
            Does Qt have any tools to create gui drag and drop style? I looked at their site and sheer broadness of Qt kind of scares me a bit.
            Even java doesn't seem so difficult to grasp compared to it.
            FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeh, its a bit overwhelming at first. They are in a transitional time right now too which I am sure doesn't help much, it has changed hands from Nokia to Digia recently and they are rolling out Qt 5.
              You can download it from here http://qt-project.org/downloads and then try one of the included examples or a simple qml hello world app and then get a feel for it.
              I believe the 5.0.2 version there has qml drag and drop controls from the IDE though I haven't tried it yet as I am in the middle of finishing a Qt4.8 application and haven't upgraded to 5 yet... I know that Qt5.1 is going to have complete qml controls supported across the board from desktop to mobile. I am currently just using the old symbian controls for my apps and they work great on everything.
              Perhaps its better to get the 5.1 beta, it should be out of beta and released before the end of the month... Get it here http://download.qt-project.org/devel...1/5.1.0-beta1/ and try it out, you may be surprised at how quick you can pump out an app with qml...
              Qt also has support for html and css directly.
              Cheers,
              Jon

              Comment


              • #8
                You can have all the visual aspects done in javascript/css/html. These will be out in the open and can be copied. For all the math, which is the part that makes it sellable, use a cgi interface to do the calculations. The user will only see the output of the cgi and not how it does the calculations. There are other "server side" processing technologies (php, node.js, asp, and many more), but cgi is very simple. You only need to know C.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Heads up! Check Qt licensing before you jump. It's not free for commercial use. We've had legal shut us down before because someone included Qt under the impression it was completely free.

                  Would hate to see good ideas get stamped out under legal obscurities.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by taydin View Post
                    You can have all the visual aspects done in javascript/css/html. These will be out in the open and can be copied. For all the math, which is the part that makes it sellable, use a cgi interface to do the calculations. The user will only see the output of the cgi and not how it does the calculations. There are other "server side" processing technologies (php, node.js, asp, and many more), but cgi is very simple. You only need to know C.
                    Yea I already have php side working, but I don't see how I can possibly monetize that and keep online service free to use.
                    Besides because of latency issues I don't believe many people would agree to pay for it anyway.

                    Originally posted by needlenose View Post
                    Heads up! Check Qt licensing before you jump. It's not free for commercial use. We've had legal shut us down before because someone included Qt under the impression it was completely free.

                    Would hate to see good ideas get stamped out under legal obscurities.
                    Thanks that is a definite show stopper

                    Last edited by Zero_Divide; 06-04-2013, 02:07 PM.
                    FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can obfuscate the JAVA code using http://proguard.sourceforge.net/

                      This makes it tighter, leaner and very hard to steal. $10 is too high for an app. $5 is probably ok considering the audience. In order to convince people that it is worth paying for you should release a free limited capability version with the full set of capability menus present but with important functions greyed out. Do not use advertising support. Best is if your permissions list is "No special permissions required". That will mean a lot to an audience of techs. I will not buy an app that requires net access unless the job it does requires such access. I also will not buy anything that requires server side functionality to operate. I do not always have net access and on general principles I want all functionality to be limited to the device on which it runs.
                      Last edited by Evan; 06-04-2013, 02:16 PM.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by needlenose View Post
                        Heads up! Check Qt licensing before you jump. It's not free for commercial use. We've had legal shut us down before because someone included Qt under the impression it was completely free.

                        Would hate to see good ideas get stamped out under legal obscurities.
                        That is not at all true. Qt is covered under the LGPL licence and therefore your source code can remain private. Only if you need to modify the core Qt libraries would you have to then make the source for the modified libraries available...
                        I have been selling applications with the Qt LGPL licence for years now with complete support from Qt and have never had to produce any source code as the LGPL protects that.
                        There is also a commercial edition of Qt that has some advantages, (mostly the advantage is support) however for what Zero_Divide is doing the standard LGPL would be all he needs...
                        Here is an old article about it from when Nokia owned Qt but it is no different then now. http://blog.qt.digia.com/blog/2009/1...sing-decision/
                        Cheers,
                        Jon

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the tips.
                          I will definately make a limited free version.
                          I hate adds myself, plus there is not enough audience to make any return on them at all.
                          5$? Its like a pack of cigarettes......sad.
                          FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Android market is completely diluted and its very difficult to make any money from it. Blackberry and ios are doing quite well with our trade apps but no matter what we tried we couldn't get any decent sales on droid... Windows phone is getting better but is worse then droid.
                            The apps all sell for 10 bucks but we tried every price point available as well as free versions, limited versions etc none with any great impact on sales... it is what it is.
                            Cheers,
                            Jon

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post
                              That is not at all true. Qt is covered under the LGPL licence and therefore your source code can remain private. Only if you need to modify the core Qt libraries would you have to then make the source for the modified libraries available...
                              I have been selling applications with the Qt LGPL licence for years now with complete support from Qt and have never had to produce any source code as the LGPL protects that.
                              There is also a commercial edition of Qt that has some advantages, (mostly the advantage is support) however for what Zero_Divide is doing the standard LGPL would be all he needs...
                              Here is an old article about it from when Nokia owned Qt but it is no different then now. http://blog.qt.digia.com/blog/2009/1...sing-decision/
                              Cheers,
                              Jon
                              From slide 14:

                              "There is debate within the legal and open source communities as to whether static linking is permitted under the LGPL v.2.1 license

                              This is due to an inconsistency in the LGPL v 2.1 license itself regarding the definition of "works based on the Library" as the Library and derivative works of the library.

                              Executables may be considered to be derivative works and this could result in the need to share the application source code."

                              A couple of years ago, the entire software department where I work sat through a four hour meeting with our legal department where a couple of corporate licensing attorneys shredded the LGPL. Some of their legal premise was based on the ambiguity above. They are corporate licensing attorneys, I simply assumed they knew what they were talking about. The consensus from management was; all products using Qt must obtain a commercial license specifically permitting the resale of our products with Qt. It looks innocent enough, but in the right hands, has some fairly substantial barbs.

                              I hear Qt is a great product. I've never used it. All I warned was; look before you leap.

                              Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post
                              ...but no matter what we tried we couldn't get any decent sales...
                              This may have contributed to your success in avoiding a legal dispute. Money has a nasty way of attracting them.

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