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how hard can a mill/drill press?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    ...I have a small workshop and often resort to unconventional use of tools including machine tools and I cannot recall when I last broke something by asking it to do something the designer never envisaged.
    I have experience breaking things. I needed a barrel wrench for a FN-FAL rifle. I bought a big Husky open end wrench and modified it with a grinder to make it work as a barrel wrench... Yep, I cracked the sumbitch... I instead resorted to using a cut off disk on a dremel and cut a slit in the receiver stub(It was a parts kit gun) and cracked open the receiver stub.
    But you know, it would of been nice having the right tools from the start, especially since I now had to torque that barrel onto a new receiver!

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    • #32
      Pull the downfeed pinion shaft out of the mill, and pull one from a 1 ton arbor press. Compare the size of the teeth. You might then be a little less willing to use the mill as a press.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #33
        Why do I always get sucked in by these old threads?

        WHY? WHY? WHY?



        Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
        given that the thread is around 3 years old, I would guess that he's found out one way or another by now.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
          Why do I always get sucked in by these old threads?

          WHY? WHY? WHY?
          You are a slow reader?

          :-)

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Elninio View Post
            I have the larger mill/drill machines (the one with a 2hp motor). I sometimes use it to press bearings - so is it worth my money to buy a 1-ton arbor press, or does this milling machine get close to that value? No point having two of the same tools ...
            Do the math!

            You have the lever, the pinion diameter and the manufacturers suggested bearing thrust load capacity.

            It AIN'T rocket surgery.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Arcane View Post
              A very good rule of thumb but maybe not applicable if you're a bubba whose bits are as dull as Bubba himself!

              However, there's a way to fairly accurately ascertain the forces involved. For inquiring minds please go to page 142 of this PDF.

              https://www.bostongear.com/pdf/gear_theory.pdf
              That site has a lot of info,the pinion on my 25 ton Dake is like new,must be made out very good material and is 1946-1954 vintage.I am sure it's capacity has been beyond that when a couple big Gorillas hang on that handle.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Dr. Rob View Post
                You are a slow reader?

                :-)
                LoL. Solly JR

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                • #38
                  Good Q Mr. Elninio...

                  We cant assume all of us have or can affords larger presses.

                  The question was not do I need to Buy a press! I thought
                  Elninio's Question was if he should continue to use his drill press as a press?? I say give it hell. It wont change.

                  Its a thick rack and pinion. Go at it like you meant it is what I say. JR

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                  • #39
                    I've seen the labels on screwdrivers "Do not use as a pry-bar or chisel" perhaps mill and drill manufacturers should let us know with a sticker if their products are "Not for use as a punch or press" ?
                    :-)

                    - Nick
                    If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      Why do I always get sucked in by these old threads?

                      WHY? WHY? WHY?
                      The way I see it, after two or three years an old thread is new again. By then I've usually forgotten most of the discussion that took place originally.

                      Sorta like rehearing an old joke.
                      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                      • #41
                        As most of us know, using your mill for an arbor press is a really bad idea. For the few things that I need an arbor press for, I got myself a small one from Harbor Freight. Firmly bolted down, you can do things like cutting keyways, pressing in bearings and any other thing that an arbor press will do within its limits. There's no reason to use a mill or mill drill for that and take a chance on breaking the gears.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Peter. View Post
                          If you strip a tooth off the quill feed, you'll have to buy both.
                          Well, not really. It is possible to fix a tooth on a broken gear, and it is also possible to turn the quill some and machine another rack. Not everyone could or would do this, but it isn't necessarily true that he'd have to replace both parts with new.

                          metalmagpie

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                            Well, not really. It is possible to fix a tooth on a broken gear, and it is also possible to turn the quill some and machine another rack. Not everyone could or would do this, but it isn't necessarily true that he'd have to replace both parts with new.

                            metalmagpie

                            You can do lots of things, but for me at least, replacing only one broken gear in a meshed set is a complete waste of time.

                            My Webb Mill had a broken right angle bevel gear in the worm cradle that drives the power feed when I got it. One of the two gears was missing three teeth and that caused intermittent movement. It was caused by a previous owner named Bubba when he decided to use the power feed to drill a 1" hole.

                            One gear was $50 and both were $125. I ponied up and bought both gears in the set so that I wouldn't have to take the head apart again. Glad I did since it's still working 7 years later.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                              Further to what others have mentioned I believe most manual machines are designed and engineered to handle the maximum effort someone can put on the handle. Use your drill press for pushing broaches, pressing bearings, injection moulding and even drilling holes but always avoid applying more than moderate effort on the handle and definitely avoid cheater bars and such like.
                              So, no matter how strong you are, you can pull as hard as you like and stop when the when the handle breaks, right? Why stop at moderate effort?
                              Last edited by cameron; 10-24-2016, 01:49 PM.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Carld View Post
                                A drill press or a Bridgeport type mill is NOT a press for assembling parts. However, if you don't mind damaging your machine every time you use it as a press then carry on.
                                For small things, like pushing small diameter pins or balls into holes it'll be OK. It's a very constant force with no vibration, so it's not a very damaging stress.....but over 100 pounds of force or so and I'd move to the arbor press.

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