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how hard can a mill/drill press?

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  • how hard can a mill/drill press?

    I have the larger mill/drill machines (the one with a 2hp motor). I sometimes use it to press bearings - so is it worth my money to buy a 1-ton arbor press, or does this milling machine get close to that value? No point having two of the same tools ...

  • #2
    id say the 1 ton arbor press would be useless to you . ive found the 5 ton we have to be hard to get any satisfaction from . hate to see your mill pressing down a ton with the head tho , im guessing the bearings are pretty easy going .

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    • #3
      If you strip a tooth off the quill feed, you'll have to buy both.
      Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

      Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
      Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
      Monarch 10EE 1942

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      • #4
        Buy a new one, 17-20 ton is pretty cheap, a used one even more so, or build your own with a hydraulic automotive jack and some channel. Lots of plans on the net for these.
        olcop

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        • #5
          I don't need 20 tons, just 1 or 2.I've used the mill before and know its limits

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Elninio View Post
            I don't need 20 tons, just 1 or 2.I've used the mill before and know its limits
            Famous last words: "Hey Bubba watch this!"

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            • #7
              I had a 2 hp Harbor Freight Mill Drill for about ten years before I traded up to a BP clone. It was OK for light milling and was a great drill press, easily doing up to 1" with an S&D drill.

              Shortly after I got it, I had to remove the quill so that I could fix the threaded hole in the side for the set screw that was used to retain the R-8 tools. I replaced it with a hardened pin that was fitted into the hole once it was drilled for a press fit.

              I mention this because that got me a first-hand look at the size and design of the teeth on both the quill and its matching pinion gear. They are not all that large or deep. So for that reason, I think that presswork with it would be another matter. I think there's a possibility that it could damage the rack and pinion gearing on the quill.

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              • #8
                Gee I would of never thought of that application, and like GNM109 mentioned, it would be hard on the rack and pinion for the quill. They simply are not designed for that application.
                Kind of like using a set of micrometers as C-clamps.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                • #9
                  Erm, have done this on a CNC mill by feeding with the handwheel The spindle force gauge was showing 40 % out of a maximum thrust capability of 2.5 tons. Nicely controllable for sure
                  Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Elninio View Post
                    I don't need 20 tons, just 1 or 2.I've used the mill before and know its limits
                    If you know the limits, why did you ask the question?

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                    • #11
                      I wonder how this whole thread relates to the endlessly reinvented "use your drill press to operate a homemade injection molder" apps.

                      Do those gadgets require "real force" or are they just using the drill press as a convenient flat fireproof table with a masher on the top?

                      I would guess from looking at molten mushy plastic, and playing with edible cake frosting, that the forces are not very high, but maybe as it cools in the mold, pressures increase...

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                      • #12
                        Measure the motion ratio between the quill lever and the spindle movement to figure out what the force multiplier is.

                        Or put a bathroom scale under the spindle and squeeze on it.

                        If you pull the lever hard enough that something breaks, pull less hard next time.

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                        • #13
                          A drill press or a Bridgeport type mill is NOT a press for assembling parts. However, if you don't mind damaging your machine every time you use it as a press then carry on.
                          It's only ink and paper

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                          • #14
                            Ive used my bench top drill press more then a few times as a press and cringe every time... also have a mortising machine (for woodworking) which i prefer to use as a press, But a home-made manual arbor press is in the future. Personally, i would buy a second machine.
                            ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
                            http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
                            https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

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                            • #15
                              Although not as drastic, This reminds me of the time I walked into a Shop and saw a fellow straddling the bed on an Engine Lathe as he bent over the machine grasping and lifting with all of his might while pulling up on a Solid 2" Diameter bar of 303(?) Stainless Steel, that was chucked up into the head-stock. I asked him: "Gene! What on Earth are you doing?"! He replied: "Oh Hi! I'm just using this Lathe as a Bending machine.".

                              This same Machine Tool was used for close tolerance work in a Tool Room, before the owner sent it across the street to his Son-In-Law's Shop. After "The Crew" of "Machinist" were done with it, it no longer held close tolerance. The run out at the head-stock was so bad, that they only turned parts at the tail-stock end. It became dedicated to one Job's operation. There was no sense in repairing it, unless only "Authorized Personnel" were allowed to use it.

                              I hope this helps.... Or at least provides a good laugh.

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