Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Looking for a tree burr

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Looking for a tree burr

    I'm trying to locate a tree burr in 7/32 in or #2 drill size. Hopefully in carbide. I haven't been able to locate one. Is my "google fu" just weak tonight, or do they not make such a creature? Thought it would make a good short cut in making a point forming die for .224.

    thanks,
    CC

  • #2
    Could you use a cylindrical burr, like these 7/32" chain saw sharpeners? http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw...%2F32&_sacat=0
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

    Comment


    • #3
      No, looking for a tree burr. It is shaped like the point of a bullet. Trying to make a point forming die for swaging bullets in .224. Looks like it's back to making reamers.

      thanks,
      CC

      Comment


      • #4
        I used a D bit with a ground shank to fit the die. Slow lots of oil and removed often to clean. Used about three different sizes to remove most metal and reach finish size. I think something similar to a barrel boring drill with force fed oil and chip wash would work better. After playing with point forming I decided that flat point was much easier and most of mine are for much larger bore. It is very satisfying when you finally get one to work. Reamer making and sharpening, laps and lapping will be useful in other things you do.

        Bob

        Comment


        • #5
          I have the snap on set, is it one of these?

          Andy

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob,

            Yes I made a 4 flute reamer. Had a senior moment and forgot to temper it after heat treating. Needless to say it shattered like glass. I've started 2 more, I think I'll make one a D reamer, the other a 4 flute. The de-rimming die was a piece of cake. As we know the devil is in the point forming die.

            thanks,
            CC

            Comment


            • #7
              VPT,

              It would be shaped like the one on the top left. However, I doubt that it is 7/32 or #2 in size.

              thanks,
              CC

              Comment


              • #8
                McMaster Carr has them in 1/8in shanks individually or in sets. They carry a wide assortment of shapes in both single and double cut carbide. Bob.

                Comment


                • #9
                  CC
                  Finished a Aneat type press Starting a few dies to fit. 9Mm case to .358 180gr projectile. Draw down die is interesting. A little harder than a derim, but not that hard. Need to make .458 dies paper patch and a couple of other ideas. Have been thinking about a hydraulic set up to extrude lead wire. If the die and chamber were heated to about 375° to 400° the pressure should be low.

                  Making dies, reamers, heat treating, makes you learn about machining and metals. Frustrating when you pick the wrong steel or machine stress into it then when heat treated it warps badly. Even quenching wrong can cause problems. Still makes us learn and keeps us occupied. Beats the hell out of sitting watching a ball game.

                  Bob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Ford View Post
                    CC
                    Finished a Aneat type press Starting a few dies to fit. 9Mm case to .358 180gr projectile. Draw down die is interesting. A little harder than a derim, but not that hard. Need to make .458 dies paper patch and a couple of other ideas. Have been thinking about a hydraulic set up to extrude lead wire. If the die and chamber were heated to about 375° to 400° the pressure should be low.

                    Making dies, reamers, heat treating, makes you learn about machining and metals. Frustrating when you pick the wrong steel or machine stress into it then when heat treated it warps badly. Even quenching wrong can cause problems. Still makes us learn and keeps us occupied. Beats the hell out of sitting watching a ball game.

                    Bob
                    Bob,

                    I've had a mill and lathe for almost 25 years. Played with them, making knives, but only very basic things. I've tried locating a machining class local in Tampa, but nothing available. Closest is in Manatee County or Orlando. Classes start at $6000 and I figure $25-30 a day in fuel cost. That'll buy a lot materials and equipment. I've mainly started these projects so that I can learn to do more advanced machining. So far I'm planning on making dies, molds to drop lead wire for swaging .224 from .22LR and .45 acp from .40S&W. I've got a Redding Ultramag press, but also am planning on one of Aneats presses. Who did you order your metal from? Cast Boolits is better and better, the more I dig into it. If you go hydraulic on your press, just make sure the "squirt" opening is in a safe direction. Read a few horror stories, about excessive pressures peaks before the lead started flowing.

                    thanks,
                    Ken

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by customcutter View Post
                      VPT,

                      It would be shaped like the one on the top left. However, I doubt that it is 7/32 or #2 in size.

                      thanks,
                      CC

                      Have you looked at dremmel stuff? I found one on this page with a 7/32 depth cut but I assume you are looking for width? http://www.use-enco.com/1/1/33755-99...der-burrs.html
                      Andy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        CC,
                        I picked up what was needed about 2.5 hrs east. They have used plated shafts from .75 to about 5 inch. Used 1.562 for ram and 1.125 for the the posts. 1 and 1.125 plate for rest. Had some 1.5 x 1.5 and .75 for the toggle assemble. Cut the 7/8ths 14 and 1 ½ x 13 Threads on lathe. The ram and posts are bigger than called for, but this was the nicest material. Did most of the boring on mill. Sleeve bearings for moving contact area's. Think and reason carefully before you cut as some of the dimensions in the plans are wrong.
                        Lead press. This is why I was considering heat to near melt temperatures. I am still in the research stage, do not want to re-invent the wheel. Besides cast bullets are fun.

                        Bullet molds out of Aluminum,Brass, Cast Iron, and mild steel are good learning area's. Bore on lathe or mill. Make cherries like reamers and cut each halve on mill. You need to square blocks mill slots, mark and drill accurate holes, and make sprue plates to fit. Then there are air escape grooves to figure where and how many in order for the molds to fill. Do the large calibers first then when you have confidence the smaller ones
                        Bob

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had the same idea when I saw the price on the polished rod. There's a hydraulic cylinder repair shop about 10 miles from me. I thought I would ask if I could look through their scrap bin. I worked at the phosphate mine for 33 years and we went through tons of hyd and air cylinders. Usually the shafts were still in good condition. What did you use to cut/turn the plated shafts? Carbide? Speeds? Did you thread or groove the shaft for "shell" holder or screw on dies? Haven't looked that closely at the Aneat press, but looks like some of the others have threaded rods.

                          Already have the Al plate cut for both molds. I was planning on the .224 first, but I'll take your advice and do the <.400 first. Yes I had seen one thread or you tube video where some once scored lines down the center sections of their mold for air displacement. Looked like he just used a carbide scribe, IIRC.

                          thanks,
                          CC

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            VPT,

                            One fellow on the Cast Boolits forum suggested getting a .250" burr and grinding down the thickest part to .220. That would still allow grinding with the pointed section. Not sure if it's worth a try or just keep making D reamers.

                            thanks,
                            CC

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              CC,

                              Left the plating and just cut to length. The posts have a ½ x13 thread in each end. The ram has a 7/8 x 14 thread and a slot to work the ejector punch. The top plate has a 1 ½ x 12 thread with a adapter from 1 ½ x 12 to 7/8 x 14. For the slot I drilled through on both ends and used a HS endmill to cut the slot. Plating gave no trouble.

                              Bullet molds I thought the ones you are working on now were for cores. If so just be very careful that you in the center seam of both blocks. Offset cores will hang otherwise. If you have room you might cut deep enough to get 2 cores per slug. Sprue plate. If made about .250 thick you can groove it (ball endmill)so that the molten material will flow down the groove and fill each cavity. I am guessing at about .125 hole to get good flow. Be sure to bevel so that you have a sharp edge on the cavity side. Surface grinder will give nice fit and finish. Air vents start with one near top of cavities. Needle file just do not put a bur in the cavity. You can always make more, but can not remove too many.

                              Later you can make molds that throw bullets with lube grooves.

                              The hardest part of a point forming cutter is instant chips at the point which stop the cutting. This is why I suggested a pressure oil feed to wash the chips out, but my point forming experience was 50 years ago. There must be better ways by now!
                              Bob

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X