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Hydraulic Pump for Log Splitter

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  • Hydraulic Pump for Log Splitter

    I used to have a 753 Bobcat, for which I built a log splitter that mounted in place of the bucket, and it was connected to the hydraulics of the Bobcat via hose and quick couplings. Well, the Bobcat had to go, and I bought a Kubota L2550, but it does not have a remote hook-up.

    The PTO drive pumps are very pricey. I have seen a chain and sprocket driven pump used before, and 11GPM pumps aren't that expensive. The chain driven pump was done since the PTO on that tractor was only a 550RPM. Mine has two speeds, up to 1100RPM. And I need a tank, since the Bobcat was the tank before!

    So my thought was to fab a tank mounted such that it connected to the 3 point hitch, then direct drive the pump off the PTO shaft. I know a u-joint or similar would be needed plus a flexible coupling, but it sure would be handy to have the tank/pump as a unit, hook it up, then connect the splitter via the quick couplings it already has.

    Thoughts please?

  • #2
    I finally gave up and bought a wood splitter because of the costs for all the components and even more so the logistics of 'processing'. I looked into running off of my tractor either PTO or it's hyd. system and decided against it. I could buy a complete already built system for just my cost on the valve, pump, cylinder, and (honda) gas engine.

    I sat down and took a hard look at fire wood making and here is what I came up with. Trees fall down faster than I can burn them up. Here on the wet side of Oregon wood left in the forest rots very fast, so getting them in the dry saves them from waste. I had a unused 30x 96' greenhouse. I cut all my logs at 8'-12' and deck them on one side of the green house effectively stopping the rotting process. So my log pile can range @ 5'tall x 96' long. I have a 12' conveyor so that after I split the wood it gets carried to the other side and loosely piled. I went with a separate splitter for the ability to move it close to the pile as I work my way down it's length. Anymore I just leave it loosely piled until I need it. I load wood pallets, which I move with my tractor forks. My pallets are open sided and roughly 3' deep, 5' wide, 3'tall. I have 5 of these I use in rotation to supply my house and shop. Splitting is a small part of making firewood my guess is less than 20%.

    Anyone who cuts a lot of wood can attest to the constant moving of chunks. Rounds to the splitter, split pieces away from the splitter, piling to dry, etc. etc. It seems endless. The conveyor is a godsend, it piles it roughly 5' high. It is on 2 slightly off center wheels 2.5' off the ground so it can be easily moved by just me. Hope this helps.

    Here is the least expensive place I have found for hydraulic parts. They have the all the parts you will need.

    http://www.surpluscenter.com

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    • #3
      does the new kobata not have any hydr. accessories ? ie, front end loader, mower lift or mower drive ? on my ol tractor with a good front end loader, I just tapped in with disconnects at the hydr. valve that operated the loader. when splitting, the loader was inoperatable. valve on the log splitter was open center so the tractor kinda idled, and fluid just kept circulation until you pushed / pulled the splitter valve.
      this would be an interesting project here on the farm. . .
      post a few pictures of the tractor. . .

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      • #4
        This is not a new tractor, a late 80's model, but it does have a front loader. Still, I don't think the tractor's pump has the gpm's. The splitter has a 4" cylinder, and it may take a long time to make a stroke!

        In the scenario I wrote above, I commented on a u-joint, but I'm not sure I would need one. Anyway, I'll need to find a tank, in the link Abner gave to surpluscenter, I saw where they recommend a tank that is equal to the GPM's of the pump, at a minimum.

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        • #5
          Unless the pump your thinking of is designed for a PTO drive you will probably wish you went with a separate engine and pump designed for a log splitter. My 22 ton Tractor Supply is awsum I've tried to stall it with some really gnarly stuff it, the ram just slows down a little and the pump goes into high pressure, it may take a few seconds longer to split but I've never been able to stall it. As an aside my Kabuto BX series is about 5 GPM and 1,850 PSI.. A log splitter pump has 2 sections in it 1 high volume low pressure , the other high pressure and low volume, in low volume when pressure gets to about 600 PSI it shifts into high pressure.
          Last edited by duckman; 06-20-2013, 02:33 PM. Reason: more info

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          • #6
            Same experience with the TSC splitter . $1000 on sale made building something in that size range for the tractor a no-go for me.
            Last edited by cameron; 06-20-2013, 03:42 PM.

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            • #7
              No idea where you are located, and the type of trees there, but here in the great white north, the land of the pine pecker pole, it doesn't take much pressure to crack firewood. I got one of those funny chicom 110 volt splitters as a joke 6-7 years ago and it still works great. It's got hundreds of hours on it now.

              I have an old L-series Kubota tractor and just tapped into the 3 point hitch hydraulics to run my post pounder. Works great. I haven't tried running my 4" hydraulic stump puller or winch off it yet because I have two other power packs, but it looks like the cycle speed would be OK. At the cost of tapping into the system, it seems foolish not to give it a try.

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              • #8
                Here is a link that might prove useful in your quest.

                http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php

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                • #9
                  This is the best and fastest log splitter ever designed and built.
                  I have one designed for the three point hitch on my JD tractor.
                  I would post a picture but I am in Indianapolis and the splitter is in Ely.
                  http://www.thestickler.com/
                  You could probably adapt this to your tractor.
                  Bill
                  I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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                  • #10
                    I machined out two of the screw types for a engineer at work. Tried one in the lathe and have to admit that around 500 rpm it split wood fast but scared the crap outa me. Talk about a accident waiting to happen.

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                    • #11
                      Thinking of the possible consequences, I'm still not convinced those are not a macabre joke.

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                      • #12
                        Yep - I will never get one of those because if you ever got your arm, leg or anything else caught on it you would probably get maimed or killed before you could turn it off.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • #13
                          I have several machines that are more dangerous.
                          How about a one HP wire wheel? Almost took my finger off.
                          You must be careful of anything that rotates and is powerful.
                          I have been using my log splitter for 10 years without difficulty.
                          I have modified it for safety and it has a shut down switch at the operating point.
                          I can split more wood in a shorter time than any other splitter I have tried.
                          Bill
                          I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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                          • #14
                            I had a Stickler years ago, adapted to the rear of a John Deere Model 'B' tractor. Had a rope attached to the hand clutch lever for emergency shutdown. Never needed it.

                            Biggest problem was that it was so low to the ground that it was a back-breaker, and that was 30 years ago when I was lots younger.

                            As scary as they look, I don't think many people have been injured by them.

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                            • #15
                              If you have a loader there should be enough gpm to run a splitter. Loaders take a lot since they're designed to run four cylinders at once. But you should be able to tell by looking at the lines/hoses. If the loader control feed (pressure) line is at least 3/4" you'll have the gpm needed.

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