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  • Waay ot big scare

    Thursday night had what I thought was bad indigestion, took an antacid it didn't go away, after an hour woke up daughter and told her I was getting a ride to the ER, she wanted to take me I said no what if something happens on the way, she agreed. called 911 asked for an ambulance no lights or siren (didn't want to wake GD or neighbors) . In the ambulance they gave me 5 baby chewables and a spray of nitro under the tongue with in seconds felt better, got to the ER and spent the next 11 hours in the worst bed in the world, they finally found me a regular bed wow what a difference, after spending 16 hours total in the ER I finally got a room,they ran more test, sucked more blood, scheduled me for a stress test (which I passed at least I didn't die), the DR's didn't say it was a heart attack, but also did not say it wasn't.

    So don't play macho man if it hurts there is a reason for the pain, maybe I could have slept thru the night and got up in the am with no problem, or a could have been found COLD, that's how my cousin found her husband after he went to bed with pulled chest muscles (read heart attack) that's what the autopsy showed.

  • #2
    Kinda makes you rethink things doesn't it.

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    • #3
      That's the problem. If today's doctors were as well trained (or as smart) as their predecessors, things like this wouldn't happen. As I get older, I'm noticing more and more doctors appear to be in it for the money, to hell with making somebody well, or, for that matter, keeping them well. I personally watched helplessly as doctors (in a hospital) incorrectly diagnosed my step-dad, last July, and then three of them were so busy fighting over who was gonna get to "treat" him next, that he died...waiting. My Mother passed this May. She got sick, they hauled her to the hospital, she spent a day in the ER before somebody finally had time to get to her (they were too busy treating illegal immigrants and dopers)
      Nobody seemed to know what was wrong with her, so they overdosed her with some antibiotics which left her incoherent for three days. During the three days, they drew blood every four hours, and eventually discovered that she was in septic shock from ingesting spoiled food. She got another round of antibiotics, and was out of this world for a couple of weeks, this time. Four doctors were arguing over who was going to treat her(ie: get the money). They finally got the poor woman stabilized and transferred her to an "assisted care" home, where she got sick, all over again. Back into the hospital, overdosed, and stabilized... and this time we brought her home on the advice of a hospice nurse. She was getting better. But on May fifth, she wanted to take a nap, in the afternoon.....she never woke up. One of the doctors misdiagnosed my bout with the flu, and told me I had a heart condition and needed half-a-dozen tests and procedures... which would run into hundreds of thousands of dollars.. AND I needed to become a vegetarian....I refused, mainly because I'm on Medicare and am on the hook for 20% of whatever Medicare pays. If they pay at all. My "heart condition" turned out to be the latest strain of the flu. I'm much better now. Today, I spent a full eight hours out in my shop, in 95° temps. I'm tired, but I feel great. Not bad for a guy who is sixty-six years old, with a "heart condition"
      Last edited by saltmine; 06-23-2013, 01:21 AM.
      No good deed goes unpunished.

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      • #4
        Was in the same situation back in 92, and so far i,m still here, occaisionaly still doing stupid things, like working too hard at times, gotta get smarter and work easier.

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        • #5
          Glad you got to the ER in time and you also had medical care on the way. That golden hour is very important as my wife found out when she had her stroke. I bundled her up and rushed her to the ER and for one in her life she did not argue!

          At the ER I told them she had stroke symptoms and they got her in immediately. Just glad I recognized them and reacted quickly.

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          • #6
            I feel a need to disagree, Dr's today have to know a LOT more than their predecessors .the technology changes daily, and it becomes difficult to keep up. Tests Available today can pinpoint a condition unknown a generation ago. AND, it is more expensive. An imager for a stress test costs in the neighborhood of a quarter million. I know it's pricey, but there are many people alive today that would otherwise not made it. No, I am not a DR. Bob.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by saltmine View Post
              That's the problem. If today's doctors were as well trained (or as smart) as their predecessors, things like this wouldn't happen
              A mild heart attack is indistinguishable from bad indigestion up to the pojnt where your left arm starts going numb.

              Been there, got the deductibles and co-pays... but you can't rack up a $5,000 ER bill every time you get a twinge.

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              • #8
                That be the case, TRX, I've been having mild heart attacks for 20 years....Every time I eat too much pizza. I wonder...is there some president for heart attacks being related to pizza, eating too much, and working for a living? I wonder if switching to an all vegetarian diet would keep me from having these "mild heart attacks"...?

                Strange you should mention it, Bob. One of the referrals this doctor handed me was for an imager for a stress test. Hmmm, lets see, even if Medicare paid 80% of the cost, I'd still be responsible for $100,000 out of my own pocket....That most probably would give me a heart attack.

                I wonder, any doctors on the forum? How much do you charge illegal immigrants, and how much do you personally get, for treating an illegal immigrant?

                I read recently that a hospital in Florida kicked an illegal immigrant from Guatemala out of their facility. Mainly because he was costing the hospital 5.5 million dollars annually. Of course, they had to fly him back to his homeland, which cost them $17,000 for a medically equipped plane and caregivers to take care of him until he was turned over to the Guatemalan hospital. The irony of the whole thing was the fact that the Guatemalan hospital claimed they were not properly equipped to care for the guy, and they wanted the caregivers on the plane to take him back to Florida.
                Last edited by saltmine; 06-23-2013, 01:20 AM.
                No good deed goes unpunished.

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                • #9
                  I thought your healthcare was covered by the state now? Or is it only the have-not's that get free care?
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
                    I feel a need to disagree, Dr's today have to know a LOT more than their predecessors .the technology changes daily, and it becomes difficult to keep up. Tests Available today can pinpoint a condition unknown a generation ago. AND, it is more expensive. An imager for a stress test costs in the neighborhood of a quarter million. I know it's pricey, but there are many people alive today that would otherwise not made it. No, I am not a DR. Bob.
                    What, quarter million dollars to buy your own machine or what? I only wanted to use it once! how much does that cost? because for that price id expect to get the machine, repair service and lease on the room its in for a year.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                    • #11
                      Why do you need an imager for a stress test? An ECG and treadmill between them don't cost anywhere near a quarter million!
                      Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by randm View Post
                        Why do you need an imager for a stress test? An ECG and treadmill between them don't cost anywhere near a quarter million!
                        Because just the EKG and treadmill is the functional equivalent of a go-no go gauge. It only proves that you didn't drop dead or your EKG didn't go flaky.

                        During a nuclear stress test they inject you with a short-lived radio isotope and scan for the radiation. The scan will show the presence (and absence) of blood flow to the heart. The scan is taken at various angles and generates a 3D picture, revealing places where there may be deficiencies of blood flow.

                        If they do find suspect areas, then they may line you up for more fun with a catherization and go poking around with the functional equivalent of a plumbing snake.

                        They pulled this on me twice. First time they propped open a clogged artery with a stent, but the second time they didn't find anything wrong that they could do anything about.

                        Just yesterday, I had to begrudgingly take time off from the shop to mow the lawn. I gave it the deluxe treatment with the riding mower, trimmed some with the hand mower and then the string trimmer. Worked up a sweat, but didn't get out of breath.
                        After finishing and putting everything away, I felt a little discomfort in my chest. I have never had indigestion, so I don't know what that feels like. I keep nitroglycerine pills handy, but also 81mg aspirin. I've never had a nitro event, and this wasn't one either, so I chewed* an aspirin and things settled down.

                        I will probably mention the incident to the cardiologist, but I won't make a special trip - unless these events become more frequent. Or more intense...


                        *my Pharmacist daughter recommended chewing the aspirin - gets into the system faster.
                        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                        • #13
                          Scary stuff Duckman -- glad it turned out OK!

                          the DR's didn't say it was a heart attack, but also did not say it wasn't.
                          Personally, I'd have a long talk with a (non ER) cardiologist...
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, after my last discomfort event that initiated the second stress test-catherization cycle, even my cardiologist declined to label it a heart attack.

                            Wouldn't hurt to have the talk with the cardiologist, though.
                            Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                            ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TRX View Post
                              A mild heart attack is indistinguishable from bad indigestion up to the pojnt where your left arm starts going numb.

                              Been there, got the deductibles and co-pays... but you can't rack up a $5,000 ER bill every time you get a twinge.
                              Even then it's no guarantee.I had an episode one Sunday where I developed severe chest pain,my arm went numb and my heart felt like it was doing flip flops.I was only a few blocks from the ER,so away I went.

                              They took my vitals and did an EKG neither of which showed anything out of the ordinary except my pulse rate was up which was understandable.About twenty minutes in I belched a huge pocket of air up along with a bunch of stomach acid.The chest pain I was feeling was lessened and by that time the doctor had figured out it wasn't my Heart doing flip flops it was my esophugus having spasms.A big dose of ant-acid and some Milk and an hour later I was feeling a lot better.Ended up it was a bad case of GERD that required out patient treatment,but hasn't came back.

                              In the general vicinity of the Heart there is a lot of stuff going on,nerves,blood vessels you name it and there can be a lot of similar symptoms.The key here is knowing your family history as it can point the docs in the right direction.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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