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Junk or sell this old power hacksaw?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by jep24601 View Post
    You crank that big round cast iron weight along the top shaft to adjust the pressure on the blade.

    (Federal regulations limit mail boxes to 1.5" diameter pipe or 4x4 wood posts for safety in the right of way)
    Did it also have a cam to lift the blade on the backstroke,or did it just drag teeth?

    Knew about the postal regs,everybody around here just ignores them anyway.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
      Did it also have a cam to lift the blade on the backstroke,or did it just drag teeth?
      Nope, it's all hydraulic. That's what the long vertical lever on the side of the little cylinder is - markings are drop, idle, lift,& up.
      The hydraulic pump is driven off a cam on a shaft .
      "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

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      • #18
        Hi
        One man's trash is another mans treasure. Being a Power Hacksaw fanatic I would restore it. Old tools and machines are part of our heritage. Try restoring some of the Plasticrap from todays monstrosities.

        Or send it on to to to an enthusiast who will restore it.

        Eric

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        • #19
          Do they have an old time museam there? Donate it because it is really neat to see the old stuff working. Wayne.

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          • #20
            Certainly let it go. I would also look for a local buyer on CL before scrapping it. My preference for objects with sentimental value is to take a good picture or two and then let it move on down the road. You can always look at the picture(s) if you want to reminisce, but your shop will be better off for the decrease in clutter.

            And ferrous scrap is bringing like eight cents a pound these days. That thing looks like at least sixteen bucks on the hoof to me. So selling it to the metal recycler would also make sense.

            Final option is yard art. Put it out and let it rust. Or spray the whole thing with epoxy paint and then put it outside. Make it into a mailbox stand or design a house number stand or just stick it where people can see it driving by.

            metalmagpie

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            • #21
              That is an unusual saw, please do not scrap it!!

              There are folks who would be very thrilled to have that to restore

              http://www.vintagemachinery.org/

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              • #22
                restore? I use one uglier than that every week! Ive been meaning to take it out of service and fix all the loose joints etc that thunk away as it cuts, but it does at least cut straight still so as I rely on it, I've left it alone.
                I just set it off chewing through some inappropriately large chunk of stock and come back hours later. I'd fettle it and put it back to work if it were me

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                • #23
                  That saw might be worth fixing. Considering the fairly elaborate screw mechanism on the top to weight the blade it must have been a good saw in it's day.

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                  • #24
                    It might make good lawn art!

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                    • #25
                      Just wondering what the engineer who designed this monstrosity was drinking when he came up with this.

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                      • #26
                        Problem solved drop off here at my goodwill center depot

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                        • #27
                          A new piece of cold-rolled for the guide abr and a little work on the sliding parts and it should be good for another 100 years. Hate to see functioning tools go to the scrapper. Just makes it harder for the next generation to get into the hobby. So much has been scrapped out that it is getting hard to find machines in some parts of the country...

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                          • #28
                            Jep,

                            I sent you another PM. Will be driving though St. Louis the last week of August & the first week of Sept.

                            Stan

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                            • #29
                              Heres another thought, when I bought mine, it had a normal hand hacksaw blade in and the cut was all over the place, but then I fitted it with some proper eclipse power hacksaw blades which are much thicker and more rigid, and suddenly it started cutting straight.
                              I looked at mine tonight and I'll wager my guides are as worn as yours...

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