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DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

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  • DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

    Looking to possibly build a slip roller. Some of you may have seen the fire ring I made, I made the ring with my brake and bending a slight amount every 1.5-2". I would like to make a slip roller for future fire rings and whatnot. Questions I have are use a tube or solid for the rollers? Anyone have some plans for one or have built their own? I am looking to be able to roll 1/4"x10" possibly 12". I assume if tubes are fine, the wall thickness should be thicker than the material being rolled? Thanks much for any help!
    Andy

  • #2
    Hi,
    For what its worth my 22 Ga. x 24 " Pexto rollers are solid. Guessing about 2" in diameter. ( not close by or I would measure for you )

    Brian
    Toolznthings

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    • #3
      I am also going to say solid, but I am not sure. I would think you may need around a 3-4" rollers to roll 1/4" in a 12" section. I would also think about powering it, that is some heavy cranking to roll that thick unless you have it geared down, then it is just a lot of cranking.

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      • #4
        If you are going to make the rolls larger in diameter you could probabaly use tubing. The problem will be that you still need to have some type of bearing and it would probably be easier to make a sold roll of smaller diameter. A larger diameter roll would mean lower forces. a smaller diameter roll would mean the curve would go closer to the end of the strip. rolling after the welding would make it more round.

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        • #5
          the gearing idea is right. i would look at a roller for making the tires for the old wooden wagon wheels.

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          • #6
            I too would go with solid rollers. It's often cheaper than cored or thick wall tubing of the same material. You'll want something that's harder than the stock you're rolling or the rollers will scar. The force necessary to bend 1/4x12" mild steel will vary greatly depending on the distance between the outside rollers. The inner roller would need to be able to apply this force and outer rollers would need to support it without much deflection. The force may be any where from several hundred pounds at 12" to several tons at 6" between rollers.

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            • #7
              I know a guy that took a HF tubing roller and remanufactured it to a slip roller using the wheel and some home made parts for his. It did have solid rollers as we had a (shared 10') stick of 3" CR steel that we both have used some of. I will see him next month maybe I can get a picture but not any sooner then end of July. We have used it for sheet metal up to 16ga works real well, 1/4" probably would go OK but might be a real workout to crank.

              Mr fixit for the family
              Chris

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              • #8
                I'm trying to design a roller as well. Only I want to do 1/4"x36" if I can get away with it. I picked up some 4 1/4" solid round at auction last weekend I'm hoping will work. Anyways.....my press brake chart says that 1/4"x12" will take 4.5 tons with a 5" V die. So I'm guessing centers on the rollers need to be a little over 5" to require the same force.
                The real problem is figuring how much roller deflection is acceptable and how big of a roller it will take to minimize that deflection.

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                • #9
                  Solid doesn't add a lot to the bending strength after a certain thickness, but it does improve the crushing strength, which you need for rollers...

                  Solid.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                  • #10
                    ^^^^ I think that 4.5" may be border line for 1/4" at 36 wide. This one uses 6" for 1/4" at 48 wide. http://metal.baileighindustrial.com/plate-roll-pr-403

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                    • #11
                      Lots of good info to think about, thanks much so far for everything! 4.5 tons at 5" that is way more than I figure it would be! I would like fairly small rollers (as small as possible but not so small that it causes problems while rolling the fire rings.) because I am sure other projects will come along where I need to roll something into a tight ring for some reason.

                      I didn't think about gearing it down, I was planning the simple chain and sprocket deal to link all the rollers. I would love to see some pictures of different rollers just to get some ideas. I did see one roller that had a break away roller so you can get welded rings in and out of the it. Is that a common deal?

                      What would be a good material for the rollers that isn't crazy expensive?
                      Andy

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                      • #12
                        Just as a reference point for roller diameter, at 12" wide 1" roller dia. is rated to 22ga and 1.125" rollers are rated for 20ga. One of the rollers needs to be able to swing out of the way so you can get the material out after it is rolled. For ease of use this should be some type of quick release and depending on roller weight/length it may need some type mechanical means to hold the roller up.

                        If anyone comes up with a good deign for a plate roller I wouldn't mind seeing the plans. I would like to build one in the future.
                        Last edited by oxford; 06-29-2013, 11:11 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Hi,

                          I've built 2 rollers over the years, a 6" and a 12". They were used for rolling die rule in a commercial setting. I used 1" diameter solid rollers running in 1/2" bronze bushings. I made one hand powered and one was powered by either a 1/3 or 1/2 hp gear motor, (it was handy on the shelf).

                          The slip roller can be moved by a lever and cam arrangement.

                          dalee
                          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vpt View Post
                            Lots of good info to think about, thanks much so far for everything! 4.5 tons at 5" that is way more than I figure it would be! I would like fairly small rollers (as small as possible but not so small that it causes problems while rolling the fire rings.) because I am sure other projects will come along where I need to roll something into a tight ring for some reason.

                            I didn't think about gearing it down, I was planning the simple chain and sprocket deal to link all the rollers. I would love to see some pictures of different rollers just to get some ideas. I did see one roller that had a break away roller so you can get welded rings in and out of the it. Is that a common deal?

                            What would be a good material for the rollers that isn't crazy expensive?
                            Here's one on Ebay that will roll whatever you need
                            http://www.ebay.com/itm/BERTSCH-36-H...item53f51df834

                            Seriously though,at work we picked up a 1/4x4' roll,hydraulic driven with drop away end stand for rolling closed shapes.We paid $600 for it at auction because it was broke.A key was sheared in the chain drive between the motor and top roll and the wiring was a mess.Cost about $1200 in labor and parts to fix it,paid for itself on the first job.

                            If your going to build one,then my hat is off to you,it's a lot of work and expense.I can snap a few pics of ours with the covers off if you want.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                              Here's one on Ebay that will roll whatever you need
                              http://www.ebay.com/itm/BERTSCH-36-H...item53f51df834
                              That one would be perfect had it been the bench top model.

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