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DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    Here's one on Ebay that will roll whatever you need
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/BERTSCH-36-H...item53f51df834

    Seriously though,at work we picked up a 1/4x4' roll,hydraulic driven with drop away end stand for rolling closed shapes.We paid $600 for it at auction because it was broke.A key was sheared in the chain drive between the motor and top roll and the wiring was a mess.Cost about $1200 in labor and parts to fix it,paid for itself on the first job.

    If your going to build one,then my hat is off to you,it's a lot of work and expense.I can snap a few pics of ours with the covers off if you want.
    I am going to try and stay cheap on it and small. Not much bigger than the 12" I plan to roll. The most costly things I can see is the material for the rollers and end plates. Maybe I'll use rolling pins or bats, they are cheap.
    Andy

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    • #17
      I have no idea if it would be better than solid steel but what if you took some tubing in the diameter you needed and filled it solid with concrete? It would certainly be cheaper than solid.

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      • #18
        That is an interesting thought. I have also been looking around and trying to think up what kind of scrap I could use from cars. I have lots of transmission parts and whatnot laying around that I can get bearings and hardened shafts from. Just no shafts bigger than 1" though.
        Andy

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        • #19
          Originally posted by vpt View Post
          I am going to try and stay cheap on it and small. Not much bigger than the 12" I plan to roll. The most costly things I can see is the material for the rollers and end plates. Maybe I'll use rolling pins or bats, they are cheap.
          You probably need to make friends with the local scrappers and carry a file in your pocket as a matter of habit.Almost any steel will work for the rolls so long as it's not too hard to machine.

          The simplest design is the pyramid type.This page has one listed further down,notice they extended the rolls through the end bearing and use them to drive a set of out board angle bending rolls.
          The top roll end bearing frame is hinged just like a steady rest to allow ring rolling.

          http://www.indiamart.com/syndicate-m.../products.html

          They also used a larger roll on top and two smaller rolls on bottom supported by bearing rollers in the middle.That is a bit tricky though,since there would be a drive ratio between the two different diameters.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #20
            Hi,

            Mild steel will work just fine for rollers. I used 1018 to make the rolls. Even being used continuously, (3 shifts), in a die re-ruling shop, the rolls would last 2 to 3 years before replacement was needed.

            dalee
            If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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            • #21
              I suspect that if the tubing you used was not strong enough to resist distorting under the pressures of rolling, then the concrete would quickly crack and turn to sand and gravel.

              Pre-stressing the concrete may help. Run a tension rod down the center. You really need to do the math on this one.



              Originally posted by oxford View Post
              I have no idea if it would be better than solid steel but what if you took some tubing in the diameter you needed and filled it solid with concrete? It would certainly be cheaper than solid.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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              • #22
                Check a junk yard for some drill stem. A 4-inch diameter will have at least a 3/4-inch wall thickness.

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                • #23
                  Truck axles for rollers?

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                  • #24
                    Too bad u are not close, I was planning on getting rid of my roller. I suspect mie are solid as the thing is silly heavy
                    "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                    My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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                    • #25
                      AK, you ever build your slip roll?

                      I am in need of this again, I need to get something going some day soon.
                      Andy

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                      • #26
                        And just to let the dog see the rabbit - please explain/show(pics) just what a slip roller is and what it is used for.

                        https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ss...roller+machine

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                        • #27
                          Pretty old thread. I built a slip roll from some plans on the metalwork forums. Used 2 inch solid, 22 inches between the uprights. Not in any way, shape or form would it ever be possible to roll 1/4 x 10 for a fire ring. Even with some form of reduction gear drive. Best to do some searching on commercial machines and their capacities.

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                          • #28
                            Good edvice.

                            A search at my supplier turned up these rollers.

                            Just "click" on each as required for specifications and more info:

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S517

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S276

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S771

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S769

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S776

                            http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S778C

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                            • #29
                              Just in case the horse is not quite dead... there is a nice close-up view of Myfordboy's bending rollers in use at the start of this video on making a furnace: https://youtu.be/ha1fAxgNIRs

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post

                                The problem I find with most manufactures and their specs is almost every machine is at least 48" wide and they are giving specs for rolling material of the whole width. I am looking at making a machine (or finding one) that is half that width and rolling material again half that width.

                                Just like my pos HF sheet metal brake that says it will only bend 16 gauge that I have many times bent double that (maybe thicker) in shorter sections.
                                Andy

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