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DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

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  • Andy, you are far closer than I am to making this thing (I doubt I will ever get there) but I found a bit of a walk through the internet interesting with companies that do rolling on a regular basis and the arrangement of the rollers on their machines (say 1/4" but more than 4 foot wide).
    Most often they appear to have four rollers but only one or maybe two are in a fixed position, the other two or three can be moved depending on where in the process they are at, so initially all are nearly in a straight plane and as the rolling of materials progresses, the other rollers at moved to the most advantageous position for the next rolling action.
    Another idea I got from the videos was the supports that capture one (non-driven ?) end were "flip up" allowing for much easier material removal at any point in the process, granted with these machines it was all automatic and hydraulic driven, still...

    Since this thread was started, someone in Canada has put out a video on his adapting the Princess Auto tube roller to a powered state using one of the electric hoist motors, my current "plan" would be to use the same basic set-up as the tube roller but increase the space between the upright plates to accommodate enough width for my needs.
    OF course there would be limits.

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    • Russ, I have seen some of the videos of those nice machines. I never did give much thought on making all the rollers move. Here is something I came up with after giving it some thought.

      The rectangles resemble slots and the circles the rollers. Something along these lines could work as a pyramid/slip roll hybrid deal?

      Andy

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      • Hard to see the idea I suppose so I made up a visual with the roller in "pinch roll" mode. This is all very crude, just for looks.

        Andy

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        • I finished the bushings and face of the last roller today. Yup the atlas hates me right now but she performed very well. Now I can take measurements and start work on the end plates, should only take a few months to pump those out.

          She deserves a bit a disassembly and cleaning.


          Three bushed and cleaned rollers.


          The main top roller has the bigger bush and the other two have smaller bushes to help increase the meat between the rollers on the end plates.


          Stay tuned for next months update!
          Andy

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          • You know, for all the naysaying one hears about the Atlas lathes, you put out some pretty good sized work Andy. Right at the limits this time though, huh?

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            • Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
              You know, for all the naysaying one hears about the Atlas lathes, you put out some pretty good sized work Andy. Right at the limits this time though, huh?
              It gets the job done, nothing fast but eventually done.

              I had to cut the rollers down a little shorter than they could have been so they would fit in the lathe. Still they are longer than I originally planned and needed so it is ok.

              I do want a bigger lathe though, mainly more swing but a little more power would be nice. I would still keep the atlas just because I have quite a bit of tooling for it and it works well for most things.
              Andy

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              • Hi Andy
                What is the purpose of the block of metal clamped onto the right end of the lathes bed.
                Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                • Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
                  You know, for all the naysaying one hears about the Atlas lathes, you put out some pretty good sized work Andy. Right at the limits this time though, huh?
                  He's not pushing the limits until he screws a plywood V-block down on a workbench on the other side of the garage to act as a tail stock.

                  That picture did make me remember the time I had to turn down one end of a 10' long piece of 1.5" .250" wall tube on my HF 7x12" mini lathe to make a slip fit into another section...luckily I had a 1.25" drill to bore the other section by hand.

                  Capacity is limited only by ones creativity.

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                  • Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
                    You know, for all the naysaying one hears about the Atlas lathes, you put out some pretty good sized work Andy. Right at the limits this time though, huh?
                    Well the plywood and sheet metal workbench did increase the rigidity by a factor of four
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • Originally posted by lbhsbz View Post
                      He's not pushing the limits until he screws a plywood V-block down on a workbench on the other side of the garage to act as a tail stock.

                      Something like this?




                      This chunk was 1/4" away from rubbing the cross slide.




                      Andy

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                      • Originally posted by RichR View Post
                        Hi Andy
                        What is the purpose of the block of metal clamped onto the right end of the lathes bed.
                        That is there to keep the rollers from walking out of the chuck. The ends of the rollers weren't exactly round or smooth so thew rollers wanted to push out of the chuck. Plus I was only holding onto maybe a 1/4" of the roller ends in the chuck so I could turn the material down right to the ends. The black stuff on the metal chunks is oil I was using to lube the faces of the rollers where they rode on the metal chunk.
                        Andy

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                        • So did you ever make your sheet metal roller? I'm waiting to see how yours turns out before I design my heavy 12" roller.

                          metalmagpie

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                          • Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                            So did you ever make your sheet metal roller? I'm waiting to see how yours turns out before I design my heavy 12" roller.

                            metalmagpie
                            I haven't had any time to move onto the next stage of the roller, the end plates. Every time I get even a half a day open that I feel I may be able to do some plate designs something else comes threw the door or the phone rings.

                            I have been mulling over the idea between a pyramid and/or a pinch roller design. As of right now I am still thinking of making it a hybrid where the top roller can move horizontally to either a pinch roller location or over in a pyramid style location. When the idea actually get transferred to paper/cnc I will be able to see clearances to know if the idea will work or not.

                            The end plates will be finished in the mill. The other thing about this I am wondering about is if I should remove most of the material of the slots for the rollers with the plasma table and then try to break threw the HAZ with an endmill to clean up the slots. Or do I just cut the blank endplates out on the table and then cut the slots from scratch on the mill? It will be more material to remove obviously if I do the slots from scratch on the mill but I won't have to deal with the HAZ from the plasma cutter.

                            I haven't tried it with my new mill but I know trying to mill threw the HAZ on my atlas lathe was never pleasant.
                            Andy

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                            • Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                              If you really did those welds with a flux core welder then you are my hero!
                              I am selling green cheese harvested from bovines on the moon if you're interested.

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                              • Originally posted by vpt View Post
                                The other thing about this I am wondering about is if I should remove most of the material of the slots for the rollers with the plasma table and then try to break threw the HAZ with an endmill to clean up the slots. Or do I just cut the blank endplates out on the table and then cut the slots from scratch on the mill? It will be more material to remove obviously if I do the slots from scratch on the mill but I won't have to deal with the HAZ from the plasma cutter.
                                As I'm sure you are well aware, there is also option #3. Chain drill the slot first to remove a lot of the material.
                                Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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