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Tapered hole in vise suggestions?

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  • #16
    I do like the stand also, it has holes in the base for mounting to the floor.
    Even with the vise removed, the stand is not easy to move around...

    Between finding this deal and finding the spectacular deal on that 8" Wilton, all within the same week, I think I'm covered for vises for the foreseeable future.

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    • #17
      When choosing a new taper keep in mind that there are two kinds of tapers. A shallow taper, with a small included angle (like 1 degree) will tend to lock in place and be difficult to remove. You probably want a more generous taper, with a larger included angle (like 10 degrees) that will be a lot easier to remove.

      You may also want to insure that the hole is large enough to easily clean.

      If you do go with a shallow taper, include a threaded hole on the top of the pin. You can make a removal tool with a long bolt (3" or more long) that screws into that hole and a sliding weight on that bolt. A fast upward motion of that weight will easily pop the taper out of the hole. Use a short bolt to keep chips and dirt out of that hole when using the vise. I use this technique to remove a MT from my rotary table.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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      • #18
        Someone on another forum said that a 7 degree included angle taper was somewhat of a standard for friction fit tapered pins.
        Any truth to that?

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        • #19
          I would get a MT2 or MT3 rough and finish reamer, whichever will clean up the best. Then get a corresponding Morse taper shank to go in the hole. Cut off to appropriate length. Mill a slot in it for a drift if needed.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by T.Hoffman View Post
            I'd say the upper hole diameter on the top rotating section is in the 3/4" ballpark.

            I haven't measured the bottom hole and the distance in between yet to get an approximate taper amount.
            That's on the list of "stuff to do"....
            Whoa, that is way bigger than I thought. Taper pins are available that large, but the reamer would probably be fairly expensive unless you could find a used/surplus thing. Or borrow one.

            Another option would be to make a straight hole for a cylindrical dowel pin. That way it really wouldn't matter what size hole you ended up with, as long as you had a straight, round hole, it would be a fairly simple matter to make a close fitting pin, which could have a drilled and tapped center hole to facilitate removal.

            Either way, it is for sure a drill press or milling machine operation, unless you have an unquenchable desire to practice your helicopter impersonation.



            Dave

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            • #21
              15/16" on top, around 5/8" on the bottom, about 2-3/4" of thickness.
              Quite a tapered hole. .

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              • #22
                MTs are designed to lock in the hole. You will need something to help remove it when you want to take it out.



                Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                I would get a MT2 or MT3 rough and finish reamer, whichever will clean up the best. Then get a corresponding Morse taper shank to go in the hole. Cut off to appropriate length. Mill a slot in it for a drift if needed.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                Comment


                • #23
                  The Reed has a taper 0.75 at the top, and about 0.550 at the thin end. 2" long.

                  You want to watch out with the taper, if you make a steeper taper it may work out of the hole on you. A little of the self-holding isn't all bad. I put a ball handle on the end of the pin for mine to give something to hold onto or pry against.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #24
                    That's what the Prentiss uses too, about a 3 degree taper.
                    My rough R.I. measurements are not far off that taper amount either. ...
                    Last edited by T.Hoffman; 09-25-2013, 12:24 AM.

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                    • #25
                      Put a threaded end and a nut on the end of the tapered pin.

                      Want to remove the pin?

                      Turn the nut!
                      Paul Compton
                      www.morini-mania.co.uk
                      http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                      • #26
                        The nut idea works... but pretty it ain't...... and hard on the hand if you slip and hit it.

                        It's a vise.... if it sticks give it a whack on the side, and it ought to loosen up OK.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I've looked at what I can find available for redoing the hole, looks like I'll have to go with a MT tapered reamer.
                          It's a lot shallower of a taper angle, but I don't think I have much choice at this point.
                          Looks like I'll have to go with a MT#4 to get it big enough for the top end (around 15/16" top hole).

                          A MT reamer will require a lot of material removal on the bottom part of the hole. Maybe this isn't such a bad thing as the bottom part of the hole is damaged....

                          Then I can buy a machinable MT arbor and fit it to the final height.
                          Or does anyone have a better path?

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                          • #28
                            Just bringing this back with an update to the project.
                            I got tired of this thing being taken apart and in my way for months, and finally motivated to do something about it.

                            To remove enough material from the distorted/buggered tapered hole, I had to go with a MT#3 reamer to get past the buggerdness.


                            I setup a MT#3 shaft in the lathe, and carefully indicated the compound to match the angle.
                            I turned some 1/2-13 threads on top of the plug for easy removal if neccessary, then made a protective knob to cover the threads.


                            I'm quite happy with how my tapered pin matches the MT#3 hole.
                            I can feel no slop at all, and just letting the pin "thunk" in with gravity locks it tightly.
                            To remove the pin, I have a collar/washer/nut to pop it free easily.


                            I think she's ready for another 100 years of service.
                            Last edited by T.Hoffman; 04-21-2014, 12:59 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Love the use of the Morse taper.
                              Q? How often does one need the swivel rear jaw??
                              Would seem to make the part slip out, unless supported
                              by 3 points. Are these swivel rear jaws really useful at all?

                              -Doozer
                              DZER

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                              • #30
                                How often does one need the swivel rear jaw? Very rarely from my use.
                                But when special circumstances come up for that use, it's damn nice to have that ability.
                                As long as the angle isn't too great, the jaws grip quite securely.

                                I'm guessing the pivoting jaw vises went out of production long ago because it wasn't a highly used feature, and had to be quite costly to produce compared to a non-pivoting jaw....

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