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  • Tapered hole in vise suggestions?

    I got a crazy deal on a beautiful old Rock Island No.86 vise with I-beam pedestal:


    It hadn't been abused, or really used much at all. But probably sat unused for decades.
    Threads were sharp, and jaws showed signs of little use.

    This old RI featured the pivoting rear jaw. I've had an older Prentiss that had the same.
    Both feature a tapered hole and used a tapered pin that dropped in locking the rear jaw in center place.

    This one didn't have a pin, and the rear jaw was solidly rusted in place.

    For the last several days, every time I passed by the garage I would give it another PB Blaster soak all around the rear jaw.
    Today with two heavy dead blow hammers, one in each hand , one hitting the side of the jaw and the other on rear part on the opposite side of the rotation point, I saw a hair of movement! With encouragement like that, I did more soaking and pounding, and reversing the direction each hint of movement.

    Finally. After cleaning and oiling, she is tight-fitted but can move it easily.



    Here's the tapered hole on the top:



    Looks like the tapered hole is a bit buggered up down in the body.
    Not sure what happened, if someone tried pounding a straight pin in there or what.
    Hole isn't perfectly round either, sort of oblong.



    What to do now? I want to make a new tapered pin and restore the vise.
    Re-taper the entire thing larger?
    I would have no idea what the taper is on the current hole, so how how to cut that tapered pin?

  • #2
    Get the corresponding taper pin reamer and clean it up.

    Given it is a blind hole you may need to grind the reamer shorter to clean up all the way to the bottom of the hole.

    Then install a new standard taper pin.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Corresponding tapered reamer. .... best way to determine that?

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      • #4
        I'd start here:

        http://www.stanlok.com/Taper_Pin_Pag...n_reamers.html

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        • #5
          Great info! Thanks!

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          • #6
            Are you absolutely certain it's a blind hole? Maybe you could turn the vise body over, and find a hole on the bottom that would give you access to get what's left of the broken pin out.

            Did the original tapered pin just drop in place, or was it threaded on the bottom?
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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            • #7
              No, not a blind hole at all. I can use any reamer I like.

              What you see through the hole is the bottom of the vise.

              I'm just wondering how much I'd have to increase the tapered hole to overcome the oblong distorted hole in the body.
              Or maybe use a tapered end mill? I know the Prentiss uses a 3 degree per side taper on their vise/pins.
              Last edited by T.Hoffman; 09-24-2013, 12:20 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by T.Hoffman View Post
                No, not a blind hole at all. I can use any reamer I like.

                What you see through the hole is the bottom of the vise.

                I'm just wondering how much I'd have to increase the tapered hole to overcome the oblong distorted hole in the body.
                Hah, shows how much I know!!

                So, even easier for you. I don't think there is any danger of compromising the strength of the vise by taking out however much you need to clean up the hole completely.

                And earlier a reference was made to a taper pin with threads on the end for withdrawal. It does complicate things a little to make the hole to fit a pin of this type, but it would certainly simplify removal at a later date.

                Dave
                Last edited by becksmachine; 09-24-2013, 12:28 AM.

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                • #9
                  A tapered reamer isn't a hard thing to find. I find it quite handy for various things around the shop, mostly bringing up the diameter of holes in sheet material to fit something. As with most things, a cheap one would probably not be cost effective, so get a decent one at least. I think the most concern I would have is keeping it straight while using it. A drill press would be the answer.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    I recently bought a tapered reamer from an Ebay seller in China - only my second transaction directly with that nation. Both went very well, and much faster than I expected. They included a roughing reamer which was a nice touch. It did the job, but on hard steel it won't last long but at the price it has already satisfied the need if I had to toss it today.

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                    • #11
                      Nice find!


                      I have a Reed 404 that needs a stand. I didn't get the pin, and had to do a trial and error job to make the pin fit. Problem with these things is that the stand needs a huge base, because the heavy vise makes most smaller stands top-heavy, and the size of vise means it will get larger work.

                      My bet is that someone else didn't get the pin, and instead, jammed-in a piece of rod, or rebar, etc, of the general size, and tore it up that way. Big vises tend to get abused.

                      You won't need to clean up the hole perfectly, if you can get 80 to 90% contact I think you will do fine. What you can't have is bumps, but low spots are not so much of an issue.

                      Do consider widening the stand base.... it sure looks top-heavy, and if it falls over it will do some damage to whatever it hits.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        Would a tapered reamer be better than a tapered end mill?
                        And if I'm buying a reamer or end mill for this, I could then make it a slightly different taper than what is there.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by T.Hoffman View Post
                          Would a tapered reamer be better than a tapered end mill?
                          And if I'm buying a reamer or end mill for this, I could then make it a slightly different taper than what is there.
                          A tapered reamer is what you want, as it will have the proper taper for a standard taper pin.

                          It is hard to tell from the photo, approximately what size is the hole? If less than 1/2" you should be able to use a spiral flute taper pin reamer in a hand held drill motor. The spiral flute type will give you less problems with chatter.

                          If you have access to a large/slow enough drill press, that would be even better, probably required for anything over 1/2", and certainly better for anything over 3/8".

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            I'd say the upper hole diameter on the top rotating section is in the 3/4" ballpark.

                            I haven't measured the bottom hole and the distance in between yet to get an approximate taper amount.
                            That's on the list of "stuff to do"....

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                            • #15
                              Wow, you suck! That stand is awesome!

                              You can find piles of NOS taper-pin reamers on Ebay for a song...
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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