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  • #16
    Try running a V belt on the motor as Logan did on their lathes. Bob.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
      I know a die filer must file things but would you all give me some examples of what you would use one for or why you would chose that tool to do something? I have never been in a tool and die shop. The tool looks interesting and in my head I can think of several applications that they might be useful for but I would like to learn what they are really used for or what only can be achieved with a die filer.
      They aer very good for filing up to a line, as in following an outline. That is really what they were made for, you'd "mark" the soft die with the hardened punch, all set up in the guide holder, then you would take out the die, go to the filer, and file to the mark, then try again.

      The table tilts (but both the MLA and Martin really SUCK at that... no degree guide) so you can put the die clearance angle in.

      They cut pretty fast, but are MUCH more controllable than a sanding belt, or grinder. You are far less likely to go too far, yet when set up right they cut fast enough to be useful.

      Anything kinda flat that you'd file by hand, but that needs a consistent surface (no mistakes rounding the edge) is fair game. With the table set flat, 90 deg edges, or else filed to any small angle you'd like, with very small chance of "dubbing over" the edge by mistake.

      Files ID or OD, which belts won't, and file shapes are various, rectangle, triangle, round, lozenge, safe sided, and many sizes of any of them.

      You can mount many swiss files, or any parallel file , such as using a chain saw file as a round file, for instance.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #18
        Nice lil vid of a home made die filer. Im sure its prolly been posted before but I haven't seen it. Oh, and the music is not bad either... JR

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqTPYqCUC8Q
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #19
          Nice....

          Seems to operate about 2-3x faster than I'd prefer, needs a work hold-down, and I'm not certain he knows they cut on the DOWN stroke..... (I couldn't see how the file went in, but it looked like a needle file with the handle end down.)

          But nice work overall.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #20
            Thank you JT. That was exactly what I wanted to know. Now all is clear to me.
            Location: The Black Forest in Germany

            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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            • #21
              I had a nice conversation with Gary Martin at the Portland "Gears" show. We looked at the Die Filer castings as well as the hand powered Shaper castings. He mentioned that he has some files for sale both "large" and "small". I don't know prices or what shapes, so if interested contact Gary.

              I do not need a hand powered shaper as I have a 7 inch AMMCO. That being said, I think I will build one just for fun.

              It was a good show especially if you are a "train nut" as it was held in the new Portland train museum.
              Last edited by Stepside; 09-30-2013, 07:19 PM. Reason: Fat Fingers

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              • #22
                Guessing that a 1/4 to 1/3 hp motor is adequate. What should the speed be (strokes per minute)? Is there an advantage to variable speed?

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                • #23
                  Finally got the project finished. I don't have room to mount the filer on a bench so I made this stand and can move it around as space allows. The motor is a 1/2 hp 2speed cooler motor I had sitting on the self waiting for a project. Wood was scrap from another project. The motor mount is a hanging type hinged on one side and allowing the weight of the motor to keep the belt tight, works perfectly. I fell in love with the link belts sometime back and have changed all my belt drive equipment, saw, lathe, mill and bandsaw over to them. I am currently driving it with a 1 1/2 to 6 inch pully but am looking to speed things up a bit just see how that goes. Made the belt guard to keep my sleeves out of the drive belt.


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                  • #24
                    Very nice looking job.

                    But tell me about the rationale for a viewport in the belt guard. Certainly not to check if it's running.
                    .
                    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                    • #25
                      Well TG I thought I might run and extended shaft out that there hole and put a wire brush or small polishing wheel on it at some later time. Whatda think

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                      • #26
                        great build but I want to know whats hiding behind the tasteful back drop


                        Stuart

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by rolland View Post
                          Well TG I thought I might run and extended shaft out that there hole and put a wire brush or small polishing wheel on it at some later time. Whatda think
                          Sounds like an excellent idea though I'd wonder about mounting it on the higher speed end of the drive, particularly for a cloth polishing wheel. OTOH I've seen fiber polishing wheels in the catalogs that I thought might be a nice thing to try and might be just the ticket there.
                          .
                          "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                          • #28
                            A couple of cone pulleys would be easy enough to fit if you want to vary the cutting speed. Files are not high speed cutters, if you go too fast they will skid instead of cutting. Medium and coarse files seem to work better for me, the fine ones clog very quickly. You will need to make some hold downs to stop the material lifting on the up stroke, those pinches will make your eyes water. I use a toolmakers vise to hold small parts, with a bar across the top to stop it lifting, bar is attached to a clamp at the edge of the table. My machine is a bit bigger, about half a ton or so, it can also be set up with a length of bandsaw blade for sawing. Hacksaw blades are not recommended because the hard ones will shatter and project shrapnel in all directions. Files can break too so take sensible precautions. A very nice job! you will find a lot of uses for it.
                            Dave

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                            • #29
                              One more thing,
                              put a cork or something similar on top of the file, if you stab yourself in the forehead, it will hurt.
                              Dave

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                              • #30
                                Blackadder
                                A fella doesn't always like to show all his assets to the public, hence the "tasteful backdrop"

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