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  • Plow repair

    Got this in yesterday morning.





    I couple hours work with the iron worker, hydraulic press, grinder, and welder had it looking better.





    I'd put this in the category of a bad design poorly executed. Hopefully, it won't be coming back anytime soon.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Originally posted by winchman View Post
    ..I'd put this in the category of a bad design poorly executed. Hopefully, it won't be coming back anytime soon.
    Yeah, doesn't look very well thought out to me. To keep it from coming back I'd weld some gussets from the angles to the top of the cross-tube--will make it a lot stronger...
    Keith
    __________________________
    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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    • #3
      I was thinking about adding a strap (piece of 5/16" plate 3"x 10") from the tube down across the front of both angles. That's where the highest stress is, and it would be easy to do. Right now the repaired side is probably twice as strong as the original build.




      I think the 5/8" bolt (in the front hole of the blade) was supposed to shear when it hit something really hard, but that didn't happen. The rear bolt is 3/4".

      If I make it much stronger, the arms with the hitch pins will rip off.
      Last edited by winchman; 09-26-2013, 07:06 AM.
      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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      • #4
        Id shove a couple of high tensile bolts through at the front too!
        Mark

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        • #5
          I'd put this in the category of a bad design poorly executed
          I think I understand the "why" of gussets from the angle to the cross tube, not sure of the strap/plate in your drawing (tube across both angles)...? Don't disagree, just don't know, which is just don't know a lot when it comes to this sort of thing.

          Given how the original sort of peeled away, were the welds not sufficient (size) or was there some other fault (too cold), in your opinion ?

          What would have been a better design from the get go? I tend to overbuild sometimes in the extreme and items get way heavy...though I know about things like shear pins, I doubt I would have thought of such for this item but it does make perfect sense for the application (once someone has pointed that out )
          Last edited by RussZHC; 09-26-2013, 05:35 PM.

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          • #6
            If the lower bolt is supposed to shear, why put a socket head screw there? Be better with a Grade 2 bolt, if you can find one nowadays, or a mild steel pin. Or threaded rod (A-307, 50,000 to 60,000 psi) with self locking nuts.
            Last edited by cameron; 09-26-2013, 10:07 AM.

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            • #7
              If I understand the operation of the plow correctly a gusset on the top would be in compression and could bend while the plate on the bottom would be in tension.
              I would go with the plate if anything. A bolt that would shear would probably be best.

              You can see rust on the inside of the welds that peeled off. Looks like poor penetration when built.
              Bill
              I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cameron View Post
                If the lower bolt is supposed to shear, why put a socket head screw there? Be better with a Grade 2 bolt, if you can find one nowadays, or a mild steel pin. Or threaded rod (A-307, 50,000 to 60,000 psi) with self locking nuts.
                My thought exactly. That front bolt should be soft. Lot easier to replace a $3 bolt that have to bring it in for rewelding..

                lg
                no neat sig line
                near Salem OR

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                • #9
                  I bet they kept shearing those front bolts and put in something harder. Worked great until they hooked into something really big! LOL
                  Mike
                  Central Ohio, USA

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                  • #10
                    You know what makes fixing stuff broken like that a whole lot easier? An Arcair torch. Makes short work of taking apart welded equipment. I watched my brother try in vain to cut apart a backhoe bucket he had twisted using a grinder and cutting torch. He finally admitted it wasn't going to happen and asked what I would do. I grabbed the Arcair torch in the drawer and proceeded to disassemble it. I used to do tooth repairs on earth saws. I'd cut off the old tooth pockets and welds and install new onea

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                    • #11
                      From the looks of the paint it doesn't look like it has seen much use.
                      Byron Boucher
                      Burnet, TX

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                      • #12
                        I'm with Ohio Mike on the reason it broke, but the welds were both undersized for the material thickness and of poor quality. The owner bought it at a used equipment auction for $200 several years ago, and he's been using it a fair amount. He didn't know the previous owner or who made it. Looks homemade to me with the exception of the blade tips.

                        The paint job was pretty good. They had used a yellow primer before putting on the orange topcoat.

                        I was able to use a prybar to get the angles off before I ground off the old welds and straightened everything.

                        The picture in post #3 shows the plow with the front down, and I did put the straps on the front.

                        I cautioned the owner about using the correct bolts in the smaller holes on the blades.
                        Last edited by winchman; 09-30-2013, 02:19 AM.
                        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                        • #13
                          I think it is just an extremely poor design. When you think of how rippers are used, it is just too light. Try to think of where the first failure has to happen and start there. A large gusset on the back side of the beam so that it closes off the two angles that hold the tool. And use a large welder on max for penetration. As shielding gases go, CO2 gives good penetration.

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                          • #14
                            Another thought, how did they attach those three-point arms with the pin bosses? They look like they could be next.

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                            • #15
                              I agree. They're welded all around, but the weld is too small to have gotten much penetration on material that thick.
                              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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