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Removing Rool Pins from Blind Hole????!!?

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  • Removing Rool Pins from Blind Hole????!!?

    I got a issue with some roll pins. They have been inserted into a .750 deep drilledblind hole. These roll pins are 5/32 (.15625) diameter and .750 inches long, How the heck do I drill them out? I've tried some drills but they wont touch the pin and carbides available arent long enough? Thanks for any suggestions you may have. Mike

  • #2
    I asked this a few years ago.

    Answer that worked for me was taping the pin a few turns and using a screw to pull it out.

    Another popular one was find a punch that just fits inside the pin and them fill the pin with grease or candle wax and then pound the punch in hopefully driving the pin out.
    Andy

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    • #3
      I've partially collapsed roll pins with vice grips and pulled them out. Just pay attention to the orientation of the slit in the pin.

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      • #4
        First I would try screwing in a sheet metal screw and pulling it with vice grips or a body panel slide hammer. It has worked for in the past. Remember to lube the roll pin with penetrating oil first.

        Randy
        Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

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        • #5
          Which of these two types of "roll pins" are you referring to?
          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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          • #6
            Wow. I've seen a lot of roll pins in my 63 years, including those in my Dad's 1930's vintage equipment. But I've never seen a "rolled" roll pin until your posting.
            Kevin

            More tools than sense.

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            • #7
              The rolled ones are called spirol pins. Spirol may be a brand name or a generic name, don't know.

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              • #8
                This won't work in your case since the pins are so hard but for the ones I have I use a HSS tap of the appropriate size and thread the inside of the roll pin. Then use a bolt to pull the pin out. If one has the time, one can make a collar to fit over the thread on the bolt and add a nut to "jack" the pin out.
                Last edited by Mike Burdick; 09-28-2013, 01:30 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dr Stan View Post
                  I've partially collapsed roll pins with vice grips and pulled them out. Just pay attention to the orientation of the slit in the pin.
                  Wonderful idea if the roll pin happens to be sticking out a bit, but that's not usually the case. Who ever dreamed up the idea of driving a roll pin into a blind hole needs to have their testes smashed with a 20 oz ball pein hammer.

                  Stuart

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by atomarc View Post
                    Wonderful idea if the roll pin happens to be sticking out a bit, but that's not usually the case. Who ever dreamed up the idea of driving a roll pin into a blind hole needs to have their testes smashed with a 20 oz ball pein hammer.

                    Stuart
                    I have done it hundreds of times over the years, I used them for alignment pins for various projects. They work fine as long as you don't drill the holes to deep.
                    Dan.

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                    • #11
                      Well, if you're going to have your testes smashed, it would certainly be appropriate to use a ball pein hammer. However, I would most certainly decline to have this corrective treatment.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        The simplest way, depending on the assembly they are in, would be to drill a hole from the opposite side and drive them out with a punch. But this depends on the assembly and many will not allow it. And alignment of that hole may be very difficult.

                        Another way would be to grind out a depression around the end of the pin and grip with needle nose vise grips. But, this may not be acceptable or possible.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          Dan,

                          A true alignment pin would typically be a taper pin, not a roll pin. This has been my experience.

                          Stuart

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                          • #14
                            I have seen many precision assemblies that used roll pins for alignment. Perhaps the taper pin is better for situations where the parts need to be disassembled and reassembled frequently, but the roll pins do a perfectly adequate job in many circumstances.



                            Originally posted by atomarc View Post
                            Dan,

                            A true alignment pin would typically be a taper pin, not a roll pin. This has been my experience.

                            Stuart
                            Paul A.

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've used (or seen used) a roll pin for alignment a few times. I always make sure that I can get a hold on it with vice grips if need be.
                              It works, but so far I've only made a mess using the grease method. I'm just unlucky, though, or perhaps the pins were too small to build up a good surface area and had a slot too large. Give it a shot. It usually works. I just have the worst luck.
                              I second the screw method. It doesn't have to cut good threads, just enough that the screw holds the pin stronger than the hole around it.

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