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O/T Apples and freezing weather

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  • O/T Apples and freezing weather

    Need an apple expert's opinion!

    I had really good luck with my apple trees this years and all have been harvested but a dwarf Granny Smith which has yet to rippen, sometime around the middle to the last on November here in zone 6 according to rippening charts. This is the first year I have had a real crop on this little tree and it is loaded with huge Green Granny Smiths but we have freezing weather coming in about a week (lows in the mid to low 20's possible) these apples are still at least 2 to 3 weeks away from even an early harvest, can they stand this freezing weather? If not I made a mistake planting this tree because it's rare to make it into the middle of November without several hard freezes even in this moderate zone.

  • #2
    Those apples should be off the tree by September. Are you located in a deep valley with low direct sun? If you can't get effective smudge pots out you're probably looking at a lot of apple sauce and cider. They won't survive the freeze.

    Here's a link about frozen apples. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...003.htm#frozen

    There's good info too about pruning to hasten the ripening.
    Last edited by dp; 10-16-2013, 03:52 PM.

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    • #3
      Radkins, i think it would help IF you posted your'e location ?

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      • #4
        How big or tall are your trees , can you cover them so moisture stays off the fruit that usually keeps them from freezing, uncover during the day and cover them at night.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
          Radkins, i think it would help IF you posted your'e location ?
          I am East Tn but I thought I covered that when I mentioned we are in hardiness zone 6, but you're right I should have been a little more specific. After checking the link posted by DP my fears have been confirmed and I guess we will just harvest them and use for them cooking apples, they are definitely not ready to eat yet raw and it looks as they never will be.

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          • #6
            Those are not the most enjoyable noshing apples at the best of times - they're mostly used for pies. Probably not a better apple out there for that purpose. They have a serious pucker factor.

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            • #7
              Yep, CLEARLY a pie apple, although I HAVE run into a very few people who hate sweeter apples, and prefer very acid types like the Granny Smith as eating apples.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                Just did a bit of research on the Granny Smith apple. I've been driving past orchards of them for years near my second home in the Okanogan valley in north central Washington state without really thinking about where they originated from (people there talk about apples the way folks in Florida talk about stock car racing). Turns out they're an accidental cultivar from Oz, and that every tree is traceable back to a single tree outside Granny Smith's kitchen in NSW. It has become one of the most successful apples ever.

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                • #9
                  I really like Granny Smiths for eating, but I like the "tart" taste. Good for pie too.

                  For the future, maybe consider a medlar tree - a sort of half-cultivated relative of the apple. The fruit can only be eaten after a frost, because they don't sweeten up without one. The trees are very hardy.

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                  • #10
                    Most apples will continue to ripen after picking. This can be manipulated somewhat by how you store them, and at what temperature.

                    Ethylene gas will accelerate the ripening, so storing in a paper bag may help. Bananas also produce ethylene, so storing a banana in the bag may push things along a bit faster.

                    read all about it:

                    http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemis...hyleneexp.htm\



                    Perhaps not as good as tree ripened, but perhaps better than not ripening them any more at all by processing now.

                    doug

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      Yep, CLEARLY a pie apple, although I HAVE run into a very few people who hate sweeter apples, and prefer very acid types like the Granny Smith as eating apples.
                      Blasphemy! Granny Smith's are the *ONLY* apple worth eating, IMO. All others pale in comparison the the sweet yet tart, firm crunchiness of a Granny.

                      Not a good cider apple though.

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                      • #12
                        I prefer the Hairy R. type.

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                        • #13
                          For fresh eating, one cannot beat the honeycrisp, picked from ones own tree. The ones available in the stores have been ruined for the most part. It does not keep well.

                          I got a fair number of apples from my two enterprise apple trees for the first time this year.

                          Fresh eating, they are pretty tasty. Tart enough they remind of the Granny smith. They are a little hard, and a little starchy. They make lousy awful applesauce because of the high starch.

                          But they are reported to get considerably sweeter after 2-3 months of storage. We will see.

                          doug

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                          • #14
                            My favorite, hands down, are Jonathans. Almost as tart as Granny Smiths, but still a nice sharp, crisp sweetness too.
                            Good for eating, or pies, baking, etc.
                            Golden Delicious is another good choice, though a red color is more visually appealing.
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                            • #15
                              I like Red Delicious for eating raw.

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