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  • Mac Pro with Mavericks -- what's in it for me?

    My favorite app on my Macbook is Lightroom 4. I want to upgrade to Lightroom 5 but this won't run on my OS X Snow Leopard machine. It's time for a new computer with more capacity, more memory, and flash drives instead of spinning hard discs. On 23 October there is an Apple media event which might announce the pricing for the new Mac Pro, running Mavericks.

    The 1984 Mac cost $2495, equivalent to $5600 in 2013 dollars. I assume the new Mac Pro will be less expensive than that. It looks pretty nifty -- a small black cooling tower with a circular fan drawing air up the chimney.

    Will this new machine tempt any Windows guys to make the switch? If so, how much should it cost. http://www.macrumors.com/roundup/mac-pro/
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    Nah, no switch likely here - but then I'm not a windows guy. I look at that and see a proprietary monstrosity that may look kind of pretty, but woe betide you trying to replace anything on failure - or at least that's my first response interpretation. Also, I find OSX to have one of the most unpleasant GUIs to work with. Others may like it, but to me there are some rather important ways of working with windows in a GUI that are impossible (or at least require obscure third party utilities to accomplish). As for the polish argument? If you happen to agree with apple's choices, perhaps so. If not, the system fights every attempt to get something done. At least its BSD base lets it play nice on our network, so I'll take it over windows for other peoples systems on the network that I have to deal with and keep running.

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    • #3
      I haven't seen anything in it that is compelling. My greater concern is backward compatibility with existing app investments. With Lion I have a stable OS and application suite (it is predictable). I'd hate to have to start over especially if I have to shell out a lot of money or have to get sucked into a cloud paradigm. There are now too many clouds and there are more clouds on the horizon.

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      • #4
        There's nothing interesting enough to compel me to switch over. I REALLY like Windows 8, the Office 365 suite and the Visual Studio 2013 development toolchain. I've got a couple recent macs and ...they're fine.... I guess. My unix needs are satisfied by a Red Hat development machine and a pair of servers. I don't have any real complaints about OS X in its most recent incarnations. But the price they charge for equivalent hardware is offensive.
        ----
        Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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        • #5
          You are the first person who I have heard to say that they like Windows 8. I'd be interested to know where you find the improvements/advantages/appeal.
          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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          • #6
            How many years did you have that Mac? How many Windows machines would you have needed for the same time period? How much would you have spent on anti-virus and upgrade software?

            Now you know why I switched to Apple products.

            I expect one more complete product cycle before general obsolescence replaces the PC as we know it.

            Peter

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            • #7
              The new MacPros looks pretty incredible. Tiny machine for a 12 core xeon unit. I could fit 6 of them in the space of my 12 core xeon machine. Kind of the G4 Cube grown up.

              Proprietary hardware. Big deal. Dell sells tons of machines and they dont use generic parts, almost everything in there is custom and no one complains. Even the mac pros use no standard major components other than drives and memory.

              I am kind of curious how much the PCIe expansion chassis are going to cost. But with the IO included most people wont ever need one.

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              • #8
                I don't want to give up my 20" Apple Cinema Display (1680x1050) for the simple reason that it is the last of Apple's matte monitors. Switching to glossy screens has been described as Apple's worst blunder. My monitor is connected to the 13" Macbook under my desk, which sits there permanently with the lid shut now that I use an iPad Mini while traveling.

                My upgrade choices are logically either (a) Mac Mini, or (b) Mac Pro, neither of which have monitors. I'd consider an iMac if they ever offer one with a matte screen, but there are no rumors of that happening.
                Allan Ostling

                Phoenix, Arizona

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Leadfootin View Post
                  How many years did you have that Mac? How many Windows machines would you have needed for the same time period? How much would you have spent on anti-virus and upgrade software?

                  Now you know why I switched to Apple products.

                  I expect one more complete product cycle before general obsolescence replaces the PC as we know it.

                  Peter
                  Over tbe last 10 years i have built 2 pcs.
                  And i am still using wimdows xp.
                  It satisfies my needs and i have not seen a program that does not run on xp.
                  I assume i can have it for another 10 years.

                  The curse and the blessing of microsoft software is backwards compatibility.
                  FSWizard - Free Online Speed and Feed Calculator

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Leadfootin View Post
                    How many years did you have that Mac? How many Windows machines would you have needed for the same time period? How much would you have spent on anti-virus and upgrade software?

                    Now you know why I switched to Apple products.

                    I expect one more complete product cycle before general obsolescence replaces the PC as we know it.

                    Peter
                    *facepalm*
                    ----
                    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                      You are the first person who I have heard to say that they like Windows 8. I'd be interested to know where you find the improvements/advantages/appeal.
                      Roughly and incompletely:

                      - The complaints about the start menu going away are just silly. You can still get to everything just fine. I had some trepidations about what appeared to be a mouse-gesture system of moving the mouse to a corner of the screen to get to things (the start screen, search and system shutdown functionality, etc.) But it's the same damn thing I did when clicking on the start button.
                      - The metro interface is very slick, but not at all required. You're not boxed in to that start page (or whatevertheheck they call it.) One click and you have your old desktop back, including the taskbar with pinned icons if you want 'em, etc.)
                      - 8 SEEMS to me to make better use of hardware. It boots fast and runs fast. (I put it on a 2 year old mid-range machine via an 'upgrade' rather than a fresh install. I lost nothing in the move.)
                      - System management applications (control panel applets, task manager, etc.) are a bit cleaner. It's easier to maintain and tougher to break (admittedly anecdotal.)

                      The new metro layout of the office applications does take some getting used to, but I do like them. There is a little lag apparent in the Excel interface. They seem to have added subtle animations here and there that annoy me a bit. I hope I can turn them off. But it's not even so noticeable as to be inconvenient, much less a deal breaker.

                      I've been writing software since the mid 70s, and spend upwards of 60-80 hours a week in front of a computer. I just can't find anything to complain about with Windows 8. I wasn't an early adopter and I'm definitely not a rah rah Microsoft guy.

                      Complaining about Windows 8 is the same complaining people were infected with when Windows 95 came out, and when XP, Vista and 7 came out. (Though Vista was pretty wonky.) Different is apparently scary.
                      ----
                      Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by madwilliamflint View Post
                        Roughly and incompletely:

                        - The complaints about the start menu going away are just silly. You can still get to everything just fine. I had some trepidations about what appeared to be a mouse-gesture system of moving the mouse to a corner of the screen to get to things (the start screen, search and system shutdown functionality, etc.) But it's the same damn thing I did when clicking on the start button.
                        - The metro interface is very slick, but not at all required. You're not boxed in to that start page (or whatevertheheck they call it.) One click and you have your old desktop back, including the taskbar with pinned icons if you want 'em, etc.)
                        - 8 SEEMS to me to make better use of hardware. It boots fast and runs fast. (I put it on a 2 year old mid-range machine via an 'upgrade' rather than a fresh install. I lost nothing in the move.)
                        - System management applications (control panel applets, task manager, etc.) are a bit cleaner. It's easier to maintain and tougher to break (admittedly anecdotal.)

                        The new metro layout of the office applications does take some getting used to, but I do like them. There is a little lag apparent in the Excel interface. They seem to have added subtle animations here and there that annoy me a bit. I hope I can turn them off. But it's not even so noticeable as to be inconvenient, much less a deal breaker.

                        I've been writing software since the mid 70s, and spend upwards of 60-80 hours a week in front of a computer. I just can't find anything to complain about with Windows 8. I wasn't an early adopter and I'm definitely not a rah rah Microsoft guy.

                        Complaining about Windows 8 is the same complaining people were infected with when Windows 95 came out, and when XP, Vista and 7 came out. (Though Vista was pretty wonky.) Different is apparently scary.
                        My wife got a new laptop with Windows 8 on it a couple weeks ago and did nothing but complain about Windows 8. I downloaded the 8.1 service pack Friday night and did the little tweaks to the UI and now she is happy as a clam. The 8.1 service pack doesn't make it Win7 but it goes a long way toward making it palatable to people that are comfortable and good friends with Win7.

                        Back to the Mac, I have an older powerpc Mac that is also not supported by newer software. So far, I haven't had the urge to upgrade, but I do stay tuned in to what's new with iOS and some day may update to newer hardware.
                        Cheers,
                        Gary

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                        • #13
                          free Mavericks

                          Mavericks is free. I was even more surprised to learn that it is compatible with my late 2008 13" aluminum Macbook, running Snow Leopard. I can leapfrog right over Lion and Mountain Lion and see what Mavericks is all about.

                          The new cylindrical Mac Pro http://store.apple.com/us/buy-mac/mac-pro is likely to be more powerful than I will need. I should probably get a new Macbook Pro with flash storage, which costs much less.
                          Allan Ostling

                          Phoenix, Arizona

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by madwilliamflint View Post
                            Complaining about Windows 8 is the same complaining people were infected with when Windows 95 came out, and when XP, Vista and 7 came out. (Though Vista was pretty wonky.) Different is apparently scary.
                            Sorry Mad .. I dissagree

                            I'll spare you my PC credentials .. but .. lets just say I have done development since you had
                            to use debug to format a hard drive.

                            I have loved every progression of Windows that has come about .. with the exception of
                            Vista. I was a little slow to try 8 but .. pretty much had to when the people I consult with
                            started showing up with it. I told them to cowboy up and just learn it (actually before I
                            even tried it out.) Then I installed it (still have it dual boot) and tried for a week to get
                            comfortable with it. I hate it .. Its the most un-intuitive OS I have ever used. I applaud you
                            for becoming comfortable with it.
                            John Titor, when are you.

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                            • #15
                              This thread has nothing to do with machining.

                              -D
                              DZER

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