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  • #16
    I use LIGHT BULBS. 100% efficient, and I can always use more light when working with machines.

    In winter, I put in a couple of "chicken warmer" IR lamps to replace the floods used in warmer months. I don't like heating the air, that just leaks out.

    I've thought about putting a heater in the mill and lathe cabinets and use the machines as the radiators. wouldn't that be nice, warm iron! I suppose I could just redirect the chicken lights.

    Lot's of ways, to do things in a cold shop.

    The "break even" heat comes from a wall hung vented gas unit. Empire! IIRC

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    • #17
      I run a 115,000BTU oil boiler to heat my shop with fan coil unit, I spend about $100 a year to heat my shop. I have plans to install fin tube in the machine area to heat it without the forced air circulation.
      Dan.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by BigMike782 View Post
        I heat with a propane unit heater. I also found a real nice propane radiant "construction" heater, 12x18? that runs off a 30 lb cyl I use to take the chill off.
        I tried a propane heater but with no insulation the condensation was horrible.

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        • #19
          Tried several methods, but the big red 220V electric heater wins hands down. Works well, works fast, and only comes on when it needs to. Since I dont heat the garage all the time (only when Im there to work) I find it heats the place in a min or so.

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          • #20
            I've got one of http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMAKA=505-0881 hanging from the ceiling on a 60 minute timer in my insulated garage. I love it--like a warm day in the sun! But it doesn't do much for my feet. After a few hours the cold starts creeping up my feet into my legs, so I bought a heated floormat. It takes about 100 Watts, so I just leave that on even when I'm not in there sometimes. Between the two I'm pretty comfy.

            Jim

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Lu47Dan View Post
              I run a 115,000BTU oil boiler to heat my shop with fan coil unit, I spend about $100 a year to heat my shop. I have plans to install fin tube in the machine area to heat it without the forced air circulation.
              Dan.
              Hey Dan, is your oil boiler home made, any pictures ??

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              • #22
                Originally posted by metalmole View Post
                Hey Dan, is your oil boiler home made, any pictures ??
                Nope it is a Weil-Mclain 68series boiler. I got it from the previous owner for the labor of installing his new propane boiler. I rebuilt it about two years ago and documented it here

                Dan.

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                • #23
                  I use a Mr.heater buddy heater,,, propane ceramic no vent with an auto shut off if the CO levels get to high,

                  It runs off of a barbie tank and has two setting and lasts a long time, It works ok for my size shop most of the time but im looking to get some kind of solar help because I can tell when im running the heater on high and have to crack a door now and then, kinda an eyes burning feeling and do not like that...

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                  • #24
                    One reason I stay away from "gas" powered heaters, its too easy for CO to build up, and even if the levels are low it still does damage. Cant go wrong with electric, its clean and simple, plus draws no where near what the welders do lol.

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                    • #25
                      I have a garage about 720 square feet that I use for both my cars and machining, as well as my indoor driving range in the winter. Usually I am able to heat the thing right up with a Duraheat kerosene heater and a small fan, sand hill 13 watt fan about 4 x 4 inch. A gallon of kerosene lasts about 6 hours at last weeks rate of $4.58. They do NOT need the K1 type of kerosene, I just buy the red dye stuff. I also have two Carbon Monoxide alarms in the garage, and after 8 years, they have not gone off but for when testing a car for about 30 seconds. Finally changed the wick this last spring after having the thing about 12 years.

                      My first shop/garage was a single car ty0pe, old barn actually, about 320 square feet and drafty - the Kero heater and fan about boiled me out after an hour.

                      This said, I also have a small Miller Mobile home fuel oil burner forced air type of heater, these can be bought for cheap. Mine was salvage, and I picked up a new heater box for less than $100.00 when I rebuilt it. I run my fuel out of a 5 gallon plastic oil bucket and only fill it maybe twice a year (.45 nozzle). I only use this when I have car work to do, for this one builds up heat very fast, but also can be humid. The kero heater is great, minimal humidity, and I can also use it if power is lost in the home, which has happened three times now for more than 48 hours.

                      My summer has ended, looks like no more golf to be had outside, back to making things in my shop for the next four months.
                      CCBW, MAH

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                      • #26
                        Personally I don't like non-vented indoor heaters, the ceramic propane heaters I can tolerate for a short time, the kerosene heaters are very annoying to me at best. I do like the amount of heat they produce but the fact that one should have a window or door cracked for fresh air takes the fun out of trying to keep the shop warm.
                        I do have a couple of the propane/ceramic heaters and also own one of the fan forced fuel oil heaters and find them useful when working in an area that is well vented, or under a tarp when when working on equipment outside.

                        Maybe I've just got a low tolerance level, but when inside I like my heat dry and clean.
                        I also realize it's not a perfect world and sometimes we have to compromise with our choices for shop heat. Remember to look at the total cost of of heat. It's not just the initial cost of the heater and fuel but also the comfort, safety, and quality of heat. High humidity levels and noxious fumes are a part of that cost that I can't afford.


                        For those who use ordinary kerosene, stove oil, or diesel in their kerosene heaters instead of the intended kerosene heater fuel, keep in mind that these types of fuels emit higher than accepted levels of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide.
                        You have to ask yourself, how much money can you afford to save?
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Lu47Dan View Post
                          I run a 115,000BTU oil boiler to heat my shop with fan coil unit, I spend about $100 a year to heat my shop. I have plans to install fin tube in the machine area to heat it without the forced air circulation.
                          Dan.
                          That's quite cheap for 10 1/2 months of winter !
                          I'm at some elevation so when it gets bone chilling here(58) I wear a flannel shirt.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by spope14 View Post
                            I have a garage about 720 square feet that I use for both my cars and machining, as well as my indoor driving range in the winter. Usually I am able to heat the thing right up with a Duraheat kerosene heater and a small fan, sand hill 13 watt fan about 4 x 4 inch. A gallon of kerosene lasts about 6 hours at last weeks rate of $4.58. They do NOT need the K1 type of kerosene, I just buy the red dye stuff. Finally changed the wick this last spring after having the thing about 12 years.
                            You must be getting exceptionally fresh kero- I've been heating with the stuff for over 20 years and have to change out wicks every other year. I can't use the dye stuff- the wicks ( regardless of heater brand or type) gunk up after about 16 hours. I only buy my wicks from this guy: www.milesstair.com/ -great web site and amazing service.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by firbikrhd1 View Post
                              I plan to plumb adn pump hot water from by water heater through a radiator with an electric fan blowing through it and back to the heater, similar to how a car heater operates. No idea how well ti will work or what the additional cost of energy to heat the water will be. The big attraction is no open flames, no CO and low cost. When I get around to it I'll pass along how it went.
                              That is what I used, though I bought the radiator/fan unit as I was not in the mood to build one at the time. It sort of killed me to pay that for it at the time, but like a lot of things, once I parted with the money I have been thrilled to have the thing every time I use it. I got mine from Grainger, it is similar to this one:

                              http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/DAY...V26?Pid=search

                              It is about 30K BTU's and it hooked up as a zone on my home's hot water heating system, as my shop is in an attached garage. It has a thermo-switch that starts the fan when the water leaving the core hits some temp.
                              Won't be so easy if your shop is detached from the house, but I have seen similar units used with standard water heaters that work great. No reason I can see that you could not make one of these up with an auto radiator or heater core or something similar.

                              I generally keep my shop at about 48*F in the winter. When I go out to work, I bump the thermostat up to 68 and it is toasty warm out there in about 10 minutes. Works great.
                              Last edited by alanganes; 10-26-2013, 06:01 PM.

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                              • #30
                                I like wood heat.
                                Andy

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