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  • shop heat

    I have been using a small 220 V heater, basically a heating element like a stove top with a fan behind it. Does the job OK.

    Would one of these small room size quartz heaters be cheaper to run. The shop is only about 360 sq. feet. They are suppose to be more efficient. Has anyone used one of these.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  • #2
    The electric heaters are pretty close to 100 percent efficient. The differences are usually in how they deliver the heat. I know that some tout kid safe and some say heat more evenly or with a better blower. You will still need the same number of BTU's no matter how you get them. Mike

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    • #3
      Quartz heaters are almost always infra-red type. It must be 'aimed' at you or whatever you want to warm up. They do a lousy job of heating air.

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      • #4
        What Mike279 said.
        I always have a chuckle when I see the $400 120 V heaters that are supposed to look like a fireplace or whatever. At most they might put out about 5,200 BTUs, just like the $15 120 V ones that only have an element and a fan.
        The only difference is the "features" and perhaps a more durable blower motor, and that's open to debate.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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        • #5
          No gas in the shop? Surely you don't heat a home up there with electric! Mine is heated with a ventless gas unit. I hang a fan from the ceiling over it to get better circulation. I don't have to use it often as the shop's in the basement with the boiler, so I get the radiant losses. And I wear a hoodie.

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          • #6
            I plan to plumb adn pump hot water from by water heater through a radiator with an electric fan blowing through it and back to the heater, similar to how a car heater operates. No idea how well ti will work or what the additional cost of energy to heat the water will be. The big attraction is no open flames, no CO and low cost. When I get around to it I'll pass along how it went.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by firbikrhd1 View Post
              I plan to plumb adn pump hot water from by water heater through a radiator with an electric fan blowing through it and back to the heater, similar to how a car heater operates. No idea how well ti will work or what the additional cost of energy to heat the water will be. The big attraction is no open flames, no CO and low cost. When I get around to it I'll pass along how it went.
              From my research on using gas water heaters for radiant, it's not too bad an idea, the higher the duty cycle of a WH the higher its efficiency since the % of generated heat going up the vent as passive losses drops. I assume when you say radiator you don't mean a big old cast iron one, but a car radiator or some other high btu transfer unit. There are toe kick hydronic heaters for under kitchen cabinets that operate with 180 deg boiler water and a fan.

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              • #8
                An electric baseboard heater should work for that size area. I like the electric heaters that look like a short section of an old radiator. The one the big box stores sell have two elements one 600 watts and one 900 watts. Or a total of 1500 watts. They are warm to the touch but won't burn you or start a fire.
                Byron Boucher
                Burnet, TX

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                  From my research on using gas water heaters for radiant, it's not too bad an idea, the higher the duty cycle of a WH the higher its efficiency since the % of generated heat going up the vent as passive losses drops. I assume when you say radiator you don't mean a big old cast iron one, but a car radiator or some other high btu transfer unit. There are toe kick hydronic heaters for under kitchen cabinets that operate with 180 deg boiler water and a fan.

                  Yes, A car radiator, maybe something out of a small 4 cylinder engine.

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                  • #10
                    How about a woodburner?, no shortage of logs up north!, flying over Canada recently left me awe of the size of the forests, fair bit of kindling there!, i use a propane heater when it gets chilly, works well but there is a condensation issue.
                    Mark

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                    • #11
                      In my shop (a miserable non-insulated pole barn that is colder than ambient in winter and a furnace in the summer) I use an infrared heater aimed at my torso in the winter. Keeps me reasonable comfy if I'm in one area. I try to aim it over the lathe towards my hands and chest. My real goal is to build an insulated shop.

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                      • #12
                        I would go with wood, but there may be issues with that, -insurance, allergies, all night heat etc.

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                        • #13
                          They lasted me about a year----

                          Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
                          I would go with wood, but there may be issues with that, -insurance, allergies, all night heat etc.
                          I have worn out TWO of the small quartz electric heaters from Canadian Tire. Each lasted about a year as auxiliary heat in my basement shop before some fault developed that I could not repair. I went out to the shed and dusted the cobwebs off a 1970s plain jane Canadian Tire heater with a visible wire element. The motor in this gets noisy after about 6 months of winter and a drop of oil makes it happy again. I think I have run it for 3 yrs now. I am annoyed with myself for trusting the new technology thinking I might save a couple of dollars on the hydro bill. Try a garage sale for an oldie but goodie! Regards David Powell.

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                          • #14
                            A little more to what I eluded to in my previous post about the efficiency of various electric heaters.

                            http://www.conservingelectricity.com...aceHeaters.asp

                            All electric heating is 100 percent efficient. That means the energy that goes into an electric heater will come out as heat. No energy is wasted. The only electric heating that is more efficient are heat pumps (air-source or geothermal). Because they use electric energy to capture heat and move it rather than to make heat, they operate at higher efficiencies.
                            Air-source heat pumps are 200 percent efficient at certain temperatures, and geothermal heat pumps operate at more than 300 percent efficiency.)
                            These options aside, whether it is a radiant, convection, or fan-forced electric heater—and whether it cost $25 or $500—it is going to operate at 100 percent efficiency.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                            • #15
                              I heat with a propane unit heater. I also found a real nice propane radiant "construction" heater, 12x18? that runs off a 30 lb cyl I use to take the chill off.

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