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Repairing a dozer flywheel

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  • Repairing a dozer flywheel

    I do a lot of reading here but little posting, but here is a little project I just finished.

    We are preparing a site for a new house and one neighbor offered to loan us a dozer and the other would operate it. I just have to pay for repairs and fuel. Well two hours into the access road the main clutch gave out.

    This is what was found to be the cause


    Centering it up


    Pilot bearing hole cleaned up and repair sleeve before install


    Finished

  • #2
    AHHHH - you learned the magic of bulldozers. They are the most awesome toys - IF someone else is paying for the repairs. They spend all their life trying to tear themselves apart. They are one constant repair... Enjoy.

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    • #3
      Good job on that repair! Hope you caught it before any other damage was done.
      Don Young

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      • #4
        Excellent. One question tho...what is that bead of weld from that is adjacent to the hole? An old repair perhaps?

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        • #5
          I did a Minneapolis - Moline 870? flywheel this summer, bored it out and sleeved it then sent it out to be ground, when it came back I installed the bearing and took it back to the customer. I installed the sleeve with Cat bearing and sleeve retainer. He said the tractor is working fine.
          He spent about $2000 on the flywheel repair, the surfacing, new clutch plate(s) and pressure plate, bearing and a new input shaft and bearings. Plus a bunch of other parts he needed.
          Nice work.
          Dan.

          Comment


          • #6
            The. owner has been having trouble with input shaft bearings and seals ever since getting this dozer but never pulled the clutch till it quit working. The weld is from where someone has previously tried welding the bearing or a shim in? Made it hard on tooling to bore the hole out. I ruined two carbide endmills trying and stopped when I got it mostly round. There was enough wall thickness on the repair sleeve to allow me to true it up on the mill after installing it.

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            • #7
              That's what I assumed. It's a shame there are people that think that they can weld, and a welder and a cutting torch is a cure all.

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              • #8
                That appears to be the pilot shaft bearing. With the transmission input shaft flopping in the breeze at the front end, the input shaft bearing is likely toast as well. Also mike up the front of the input shaft where it enters the bearing you're replacing. It may be worn undersized or eccentric. It's magic moments like these that caused me to get rid of my dozer and just rent whatever I need. If you think a breakdown sux in your driveway, you would really hate a breakdown on a remote jobsite in the woods with snow on the ground. A mechanical issue can turn a useful machine into a 10 ton roadblock in 2 seconds flat. Good luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  ditto what Epanzella just wrote and in fact was going to be my comment but I will add the following,

                  your front main is most likely toast, that is most likely a given due to the amount of slop the other bearings bore went through,

                  now you have a situation, you've taken all the slop out of the shaft but not with the massive front main but a small little nosecone pilot bearing that's also way far away from the mains loading area - it is in no way/shape or form designed for this, you stand a very good chance at snapping the nose cone off the mainshaft if you assemble "as is" ,

                  I can't imagine all the work you had to do to get this far just for two hours of use of their POS,,, don't get screwed even further - tell them what the score is and let them know you need "real money" for all the work your about to do on top of the barter you got going on ------- one should not have to rebuild an entire dozer drivetrain for a little bit of work... good luck - but please heed my warning - not a good situation to just throw it back together...

                  Edit; you are in deep - real deep - it's tranny rebuild time... I can guarantee you that once you go in to replace that main you will find so much more as everything has been running in the old mains hash, you can count on pretty much replacing every bearing in the trans if you want to do it right,,, im sorry but really time to have a sit down talk with the owners - in the meanwhile take a measurement of the mainshaft slop and let us know how much...

                  if it's really excessive you may have some damaged gear teeth...
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 10-29-2013, 11:19 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    After tearing into my old cat I can attest to what the others are saying. I had a leaky seal on a final drive. Bull gear was loose and wore out the splines on the shaft. By the time I was done I replaced every bearing, shaft and gear in that side. There are many problems not address by a simple repair to that bearing housing.
                    This is not fair to you and I think they should pony up or you should return it in "like it was" condition. You can easily dump thousands into a machine worth less than the repairs, I know this from experience. I would get away from this thing ASAP, and expect them to hate you as the worst possible outcome.

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                    • #11
                      I bought an old IH TD340 dozer in 1987 for about $3100. It ran pretty well and the tracks were in good shape, but the rollers and idler wheels were about worn out, and the brakes/clutches were very marginal. It would have cost about $2500 to get it fixed, and I had already done most of the work I needed to do. I sold it around 1995 for about $1500. It was fun to drive but I found that it is much better to just rent one or even hire someone with a dozer. I had a guy spend a full day roughing in a 300 ft driveway and it cost only about $400. Here's my "big cat":

                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "They spend all their life trying to tear themselves apart."

                        Yes, in that way, Bulldozers are the helicopters of the ground. A large powered oil leak.
                        James Kilroy

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                        • #13
                          My dad was half owner in a dozer. He used it on his property for a couple of years with no issues. Other half took it to his property and broke it! Traded up (or actually down), broke that one and then consulted with my dad on getting a third machine. This other guy had worked at a pit mine where overworking a dozer had no meaning. When one broke there, they got the next one and kept working. Those dozers were D-7 or some such beasts and the machines he was breaking were smaller yet he worked 'em like big Cats. The last one he broke by filling with oil AFTER locking a main bearing cap on the crank shaft. I know because that is what I found when I opened it up to try to fix it.
                          Same guy went into custom corn picking. He'd buy a used combine and run it like a new one throwing chains and such then go buy another one to replace it. Ended up killing his wife's business with all the debt from his tearing up equipment.
                          While looking for a rental house for a friend, we saw a large anvil with the horn busted off. So I told this dozer killer we found his lost anvil. He was mad as hell but with all his wife's customers present, (they were laughing at my quip) he could only color up.
                          Krutch


                          Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                            ditto what Epanzella just wrote and in fact was going to be my comment but I will add the following,

                            I can't imagine all the work you had to do to get this far just for two hours of use of their POS,,, don't get screwed even further - tell them what the score is and let them know you need "real money" for all the work your about to do on top of the barter you got going on ------- one should not have to rebuild an entire dozer drivetrain for a little bit of work... good luck - but please heed my warning - not a good situation to just throw it back together...

                            Edit; you are in deep - real deep - it's tranny rebuild time... I can guarantee you that once you go in to replace that main you will find so much more as everything has been running in the old mains hash, you can count on pretty much replacing every bearing in the trans if you want to do it right,,, im sorry but really time to have a sit down talk with the owners - ...
                            My thoughts exactly and probably the main reason I've always lived by the old adage of...never a borrower or a lender be. I've always been better off in the long run renting or hiring.
                            As some of the others here have suggested, don't be talked into what you hoped would be saving money, by fixing someone else's broken down machinery.
                            Who knows how much time and abuse that old cat has already endured...and now it's your turn to spin the wheel and hope it doesn't fall apart while using it.
                            Tell the neighbor tactfully that time is more important at this point and that you'll hire someone to do the job, after all winter is coming and you can't afford to work on, and or repair equipment all winter.

                            You've got a new house to build. You probably don't have the time and money to rebuild a machine who's history you don't know.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There is another way to look at this as well , he may have had enough sense to stop when it started to make strange noises , or was an operator not a seat warmer.
                              If its not your machine then dont make extra work for yourself either , just repair what is necessary to finish your job and hand it back with a warning that it could be needing more work soon.

                              I have seen people whose efforts on a dozer are nothing short of equipment vandalism , they charge into obstacles or expect a D4 to work like a D11.

                              Any equipment is designed to be used within its capabilities , unlike what a lot think "its a dozer you can trash it ", any machine will break if abused .
                              Michael

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