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Plus one for Edison.

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  • Plus one for Edison.

    For the last week I have been embroiled in the fault finding on one of a pair of brass table lamps. For some time the wife has been bemoaning the fact that one of the lamps had failed. Me with my usual 'she broke it she mend it' was only listening with half an ear.

    Eventually the wife bought some new lamps, which to me is odd in that they shouldnt go bad as they are neon flicker lamps, so by my reasoning shouldnt stop working.

    So comes the day when the new lamps arrive, duly plugged in and again no joy!
    I,m now interested, why wouldnt they work, very puzzled, pull meter out check fuses,all Ok. Try lamps from working lamp, OK. Check continuity of wires OK.
    Very puzzled take lamp to wokshop and try passing current trough cable to lamp socket, all OK.
    By now very puzzled and wondering if bulb is not touching pins
    ( UK bayonet socket). Find old lamp pull base of so connect to pins on the inside, not Ok no connection to pins!

    Reason is the socket top has turned in relation to the socket base! They are supposed to have 2 location indentations to locate in the base but they are insufficient to do the job!

    I now see why you use Edison screw bulbs over the pond!

    Now much wiser

    Peter
    I have tools I don't know how to use!!

  • #2
    Now comes the Screw-in-the-lightbulb jokes...
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    • #3
      Your message-ender, "I have tools I don't know how to use!!", prompts the speculation that we over here have solutions for problems of which we were unaware.

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      • #4
        I for one was always unsure as to the advantages of Edison screw lamps, apart from the oft seen in films where a quick turn would turn off the light so the 'burglar' would be unseen whilst in UK you have to put the bulb somewhere.
        But the holders have the advantage of being in one piece.

        Peter
        I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ptjw7uk View Post
          I now see why you use Edison screw bulbs over the pond!
          Don't worry, its just your little island that has the problem
          Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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          • #6
            One of the disadvantages of the Edison socket, is the possibility to touch the metal part. The bayonet type, you would have to stick your finger in the empty socket.
            Helder Ferreira
            Setubal, Portugal

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            • #7
              One of the disadvantages of the Bayonet Cap..

              is the way the spring loaded contacts are pushed into the bulbs soft soldered connections ,especially if the bulb has been fitted for a long period.
              Sometimes the holder is destroyed when the bulb is removed due to this.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MrSleepy View Post
                One of the disadvantages of the Bayonet Cap..

                is the way the spring loaded contacts are pushed into the bulbs soft soldered connections ,especially if the bulb has been fitted for a long period.
                Sometimes the holder is destroyed when the bulb is removed due to this.
                Agreed, also possible to break the bulb. The inventor should have stuck to the pointy bits on the end of muskets.
                Dave

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                • #9
                  I believe Tesla invented the bayonet base lamp for the 189? Chicago worlds fair.

                  --Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    Don't know who invented what, but I was always puzzled about the use of aluminum for the 'neutral' side of the screw base socket. By all accounts, it's already oxidized before making it into the packaging, let alone installed in the house and a bulb screwed in. It's a wonder it works at all.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      I'm not for or against either the bayonet type [ BC ] or Edison [ ES ] but what does piss me off is over here we can buy BS or ES bulbs with no problem, in fact ES seems to be making a good headway but unless you go on line or to specialised outlets you can't buy a simple ES bulb holder.

                      Some while ago I dropped on a big box of 25v machine light bulbs, brilliant until I opened them, Eddison type.

                      OK saved enough on the bulbs to afford two new holders for the Bridgy [ Hawk spit - ding ] but at that time I had to buy two cheap lamps and cannibalise the holders.

                      Things have got slightly better but not much, still a mix and match problem over here.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by darryl View Post
                        Don't know who invented what, but I was always puzzled about the use of aluminum for the 'neutral' side of the screw base socket. By all accounts, it's already oxidized before making it into the packaging, let alone installed in the house and a bulb screwed in. It's a wonder it works at all.
                        No need to be puzzled, it's cheaper!

                        And when it doesn't work, they get to sell you another one.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
                          One of the disadvantages of the Edison socket, is the possibility to touch the metal part. The bayonet type, you would have to stick your finger in the empty socket.
                          The screw portion is what you must mean.... it is supposed to be connected to the neutral conductor, which is earthed. Of course, with a non-polarized plug, like Schuko, or the ones we used over here up until maybe 50 years ago, you don't know which is connected to it, but for about 50 years the sockets and plugs have been polarized. Plus, there is generally insulation sticking up that discourages touching that.

                          Only the small contact in the middle is connected to a "live" wire, so, yes, you'd have to touch that, AND not touch the screw portion (or you'd get a buzz right away and pull away from it).

                          Aluminum is cheaper... yes. OLD lamps used brass for the threaded part. The aluminum is a new thing. Not a good one either, because the bulbs usually have aluminum also. The oxidation is not the problem, it is galling and semi-welding of the two together.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            My son once tried to fit an ES bulb into a BC lamp holder, BIG BANG!
                            Dave

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ptjw7uk View Post
                              Eventually the wife bought some new lamps, which to me is odd in that they shouldnt go bad as they are neon flicker lamps, so by my reasoning shouldnt stop working.
                              The neon lamps dont last forever. As the lamps are used the neon gets sputtered under the electrodes and the pressure slowly drops until the lamps finally stops working. This is a very slow process and can take years.

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