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  • Tougher Drills???

    Hard Drills from TTP???
    I drill out a LOT of bolts from Machines at Work, some are tough as heck, Any you guys hear about these drills? Suposed to be good for tough steels or am I better of with a Nachi Drill bit? Thanx Mike



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTGB9Od0ND0

  • #2
    I don't see anything special on that video. His technique is slow speed and high feed pressure and any quality drill will do that.
    "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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    • #3
      Yup, any quality drill will do that. The harder the material, the slower the speed and in some cases the feed is increased (work hardening material for example). Mostly you want the drill to have a 135° or so point angle to reduce the needed power. You also want a point on it that is a little bit positive from the center also so the web area actually cuts instead of extrudes material.

      TL;DR: Nothing new, just marketing hype.
      Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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      • #4
        Nachi is the best I've used. But I'm no expert.

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        • #5
          The poor guy in the video needs to do a little work bench/vise maintenance. It looks like he is about to push the vise right off the bench or the bench right out the shop door.

          Stuart

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          • #6
            I drill out many tough bolts, they run in a old videx machine and are self tightening from the massive pounding these old machines Take, I usually have to resort to a carbide drill but end up welding a nut onto the end and trying to get it out, man there have been some bitch bolts for sure hours spent removing them, Drills usually a nachi (I have a few) but also tried left hand drills , Problem is the material is so tough and seems to work harden fast . Anyhow??? Thanks ? Mike

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            • #7
              I'm with Jaakko. <50 fpm, good sharp bit, and heavy feed. You didn't say what drilling machine you use. If you're just relying on body weight, try rigging a lever feed or mag base.
              It's quite possible that the guy in the vid had some mechanical assistance.Either that, or he was a lot bigger than me!

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              • #8
                I bought a set of cobalt drills recently, but pricy but they will drill damn near anything, plenty of coolant, steady pressure low revs.
                I still use hardmetal stellite drills from time to time, they will happily drill/melt through a file without hesitation, dont use coolant! We had a guy drilling throat armour for a blastfurnace who knackered loads of them, he was using flood coolant on the radial drill.
                Mark

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                • #9
                  12.9 Grade Drills ,I get to drill these out, usually someone tries to drill them out before I get to them. They usually work harden the crap out of the surface, I end up using a carbide drill to get through the case hardened surface, Then i try to drill through and then weld onto it a nut or ??and try to remove the syuck Bolt, Its amazing hiow tiight some are. thanx all Mike

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                  • #10
                    Years ago, at a tool show, I saw a guy drilling through files with some drills he was selling. They were out of my price range at the time and I didn't buy any but the show sure made them look good. Don't know if they were really "super" or what the brand was now, but someone else may have some info about them.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by firbikrhd1 View Post
                      Years ago, at a tool show, I saw a guy drilling through files with some drills he was selling. They were out of my price range at the time and I didn't buy any but the show sure made them look good. Don't know if they were really "super" or what the brand was now, but someone else may have some info about them.
                      Sounds like a carbide drill, goes like a piss in to the snow when drilling case hardened parts
                      Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                        Sounds like a carbide drill, goes like a piss in to the snow when drilling case hardened parts
                        I don't believe they were carbide and there was no mention of them being such during the demonstration. For all I know it could have been "snake oil". Those shows always have several people representing various products and seem to be able to make them do fantastic thinks that I don't seem to be able to make them do at home. If they were truly some kind of "super steel" I wish I had bought some.

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                        • #13
                          Website reports they are cobalt steel alloy drill bits. Nice but not exotic. TTP is an English company and they are proud of their drills. 88 pounds (~$145) for a 19 bit set (sub 13mm) and up. Bits over
                          13mm start at $6 and go up each.
                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            Die drills are also good for this kind of stuff.

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                            • #15
                              the question for people drilling through files is, are those files still usable as files before they drill em? :P
                              they could of easily have been annealed files.
                              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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