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Ford 300 I six engine (working scale model)

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  • Ford 300 I six engine (working scale model)

    Gentlemen,
    It's been awhile since I posted anything so I'll update you on my current project. I won't post the whole build as it's on another forum but I will give you the highlights of the build so far.
    For this winter's project I wanted to build another engine but this time in a configuration (cylinder count) that I don't have. I decided on an inline six based somewhat on my 4 cylinder engine. While drawing up the plans for it I decided to detail it more so than the 4 cylinder engine. This brought me to the venerable Ford 300 I six.
    Working from just pictures I started creating the drawings. The engine will have a .750 bore and an .875 stroke. It will be water cooled, this time through the block and head. It will have a splash oil system as it has proven itself with the 4 cylinder engine.
    Before cutting any metal I had to see if I could make the required helical gears to drive the distributor from the camshaft. Trying to make this engine more prototypical I would need the distributor mid block. A fellow on one of the other forums came up with a fixture and method to cut these gears. His name is Chuck Fellows. Along with Chuck another gentleman, produced a spread sheet to spit out the required numbers for P.D., tooth counts, etc.
    gbritnell
    http://smg.photobucket.com/user/gbri...b8dc1.jpg.html



  • #2
    What is the other site I'd like to look at what you've done.

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    • #3
      Here's the link.
      gbritnell
      http://www.modelenginemaker.com/inde...ic,2295.0.html

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      • #4
        Here's a video link to cutting the helical gears.
        gbritnell
        http://youtu.be/blaZ5tz0_6E

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        • #5
          I demand proof that this is a metal shop and not some artistic rendition of one(not a chip seen!)
          Great work, I thought I was just a wood butcher, add metal to that now
          "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

          My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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          • #6
            ok, so here's the start of the engine machining. First up is the block. It's made from 6061 aluminum. It will have pressed in iron sleeves which will form the water jackets. It started from a block and was whittled away using angle plates and rotary table on the mill. For this engine I have come up with a much easier way to mount the crank. Rather than line boring, which is a royal pain in these smaller sizes, I have machined the bearing areas rectangular and will make the bronze inserts to fit. Naturally the center ones will be split to mount on the crank but the end bearings will be one piece, the rear also being cut for an -O- ring seal. The cam hole was put through when the block was solid thus providing support for the long tools. I have an Autocad drawing program that I use for my drawings and for making step-off charts for a lot of the radiused shapes and features.
            gbritnell



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            • #7
              The distributor side of the block took the most time. It has all the bosses for the oil filter, fuel pump, motor mounts, dipstick etc. With careful layout and machining all of the shapes were developed and finished. The distributor boss was left for last as it would take a special setup to put the hole in at the proper position and angle for the gears to mesh properly.
              gbritnell



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              • #8
                2.391 cu.in. ___if my 35 year old formulas in my hard head aren't corrupted.
                .7854 x B x B x S x # of cylinders.
                If your good it'll dyno 3 HP.

                All these years I only THOUGHT I was an engine builder.
                Last edited by Tilaran; 11-04-2013, 12:37 PM.

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                • #9
                  Looks nice- I had a 1996 F-150 with the 300 and a stick. Great engine.

                  A question: the prototype has a nearly square (slightly oversquare) 4.00 to 3.980 bore/stroke ratio. Why are you going for an undersquare .750 bore and .875 stroke?
                  Last edited by CarlByrns; 11-04-2013, 12:10 PM.

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                  • #10
                    that is simply beautiful, what an amazing job! Can't wait to see it finished.

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                    • #11
                      The cylinder head is next. It's made from ductile iron or in this case Durabar. It's a very fine grained iron that cuts nice and leaves sharp edges. To try and emulate the full sized engine as much as possible the pushrods and spark plugs have to be on the same side of the head. The intake and exhaust are on the other. I did as much moving of ports and pushrod holes to fit the spark plugs in and ended up with 8-36 threads for the plugs. I have made plugs this small before so there shouldn't be a problem with them working.
                      Much similar to the block machining the majority of the work was done with an angle plate and rotary table. The combustion chambers were stepped out with a ball mill and then hand finished with mounted stones and riffler files.
                      gbritnell



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                      • #12
                        The crankshaft is made from 1144 stressproof steel. As the name implies this steel doesn't warp or warps minutely when cut so it makes a good material for crank machining. Here again following the full sized crankshaft I mimicked the counterweight shapes. I have no idea what the balance will be when finished but I can always machine them away later. Better to have them than to add them later. The journals, mains and rods are .312 diameter. The mains were rough turned on the lathe leaving about .007 to clean up after the throws were turned. After that the rod journals were milled to a square shape leaving about .03 for turning. A fixture had to be made to offset mount the crank in the lathe for turning. By milling most of the stock off it takes less time to turn, and it is also easier on the nerves.
                        gbritnell


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                        • #13
                          The oil pan and lower front cover flange are all machined as one. This part is also made from 6061 aluminum. The outside shape has draft on it so I started from the inside and roughed out the cavity. Once this was done I I made a fixture to locate the pan so the angular surfaces could be cut on the outside.
                          gbritnell



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                          • #14
                            Here's several pictures of the 3 major parts assembled.
                            gbritnell


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                            • #15
                              I always liked the 300I6. Thanks for sharing the build! I will quite enjoy this!
                              Andy

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