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Derck's Gauge Dial

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  • Derck's Gauge Dial

    I found this among some old (1930s-1940s) machinist tools I inherited from my father. There is an old thread here about it:
    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...k-s-Gauge-Dial







    I saw something similar on eBay but not quite the same:
    http://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_nk...lar+Slide+Rule

    And this describes it:
    http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...cks-gauge-dial

    It looks like it could be useful, but I need a magnifier to read most of the text. It's made from coated paper or cardboard and it has turned brown, but it seems to be complete and the dials work. Anyone ever see one? Ideas about its worth?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 11-08-2013, 01:24 AM. Reason: added image
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

    Paul: www.peschoen.com
    P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
    and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

  • #2
    Old Machinist Tools

    I took some pictures of the other old machinist tools from my father. These are low res pictures but you can get the idea:









    Some of them may still be useful, and others I'm not so sure about. The inspection mirror is pretty much useless, but might be restored with a new mirror. The radius gauge is good. The Union Tool Co. small caliper has inside and outside reading marks. There is an L S Starrett #19 protractor and a Brown and Sharpe tempered #4 square. A B&S standard wire gauge #688. The dividers are B&S #800, B&S #810, B&S #801, and a Starrett of unknown model. There is a B&S #252 inside micrometer and a Starrett turns counter in original cases. A B&S #790 plumb bob in original cardboard box. The angle block is B&S #750A (I also have another one and a clamp). And, finally, there is what appears to be a height gage with adjustable scribers, but I'm not sure just what it's called or how it is to be used.

    Any help identifying these items more accurately will be appreciated. Thanks.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 11-08-2013, 01:59 AM.
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

    Paul: www.peschoen.com
    P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
    and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

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    • #3
      Shoot, those look just like tools I use on a regular basis except mine aren't so old or as well made. You got a nice inside mic, two protractors, a square, dividers, calipers, radius gauge, thickness guage, a rpm gauge, what looks to be a plumb bob, a v block and a well equipped surface gauge, and the best part is, they run in the family!
      James Kilroy

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      • #4
        Yep! Except for the RPM (actually rev counter) they all look "state of the art" to me. I do like that
        adjustable square.
        ...lew...

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        • #5
          Derck's gauge dial's are very useful in a machine shop but other trade use them to. You could still buy them new until about 10 or 15 years ago. I have three squirrelled away. The same company also made other calculators like the " simple-fyer" (their spelling) for calculating angle and trig information.
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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          • #6
            I have one of those dial gauges somewhere.... My father gave it to me when I was a kid!

            Craig

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            • #7
              Thanks or the information. I found the following which describes how to use the surface gauge:
              http://www.technologystudent.com/equip1/surgau1.htm

              The tool looks very similar to what I have. It seems that I have both a short and a long arm that can be used. But the ends of these arms have a screw holding a small metal square with sharp edges, and I'm not sure how that is used. Also, there is a fine adjustment in the base which seems to be unnecessary, and two buttons which push onto the surface, apparently to lift it up, but they also seem to be not really needed. However, I have heard that a precision ground block on a smooth surface will create a bit of a vacuum and perhaps it sticks more tightly than I would expect.

              Some other information I found:
              http://www.micromark.com/TOOLMAKERS-...AUGE,7115.html

              And the Starrett website shows that this may be the following part number, and the buttons are gauge pins for linear work:
              http://www.starrett.com/metrology/pr...face-Gages/57B

              Seems they haven't changed much, and it's a $200 tool.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

              Paul: www.peschoen.com
              P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
              and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

              Comment


              • #8
                The two pins when pushed down can guide the base along the edge of the surface it is resting on. The fine adjustment is essential for setting the pointer to a particular height.

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                • #9
                  ...and the small squares are just stops to prevent the arm from being pulled through the hole.

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                  • #10
                    The small squares are scribes for reaching in bores, etc.
                    Toolznthings

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TOOLZNTHINGS View Post
                      The small squares are scribes for reaching in bores, etc.
                      Ah, that makes sense. The new tools appear to have just a round washer, and the other end is cut flat rather than with a ball that is on mine. Thanks.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

                      Paul: www.peschoen.com
                      P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
                      and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Small square parts with sharp edges are probably scribers for marking lines in layout dye. Machinists would lay out the edges of a part on the stock and then cut to the lines by eye. Some still do.
                        Don Young

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