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  • car timing belt

    is it expensive to fit a timing belt to a car and why UK cars.?Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    Every make/model is different.
    I could change the belt on my Jetta at the side of the road if I had to.
    The Acura was far more difficult.

    Some Honda models use the belt to drive the water pump so if you have it done on a Honda, consider a new water pump as well.

    There is a video on here of Paul Compton changing the timing belt on a motorbike which I'll link up if I can find it.

    Here it is. Damn I'm good at this internet thing.
    Last edited by MotorradMike; 12-04-2013, 06:47 PM.
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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    • #3
      Tight bastard.
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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      • #4
        Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
        Tight bastard.
        Quite right.
        They need to be fairly tight.
        Not entirely sure all belts were born prior to their parents weddings though.
        Mike

        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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        • #5
          On some Ferraris it's an engine out job.

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          • #6
            Depends what car it is?

            on some can be a right old pain in the ass. Others are simple and if you're real lucky it'll be a clearance engine, which you can run until it breaks, then fix it. If it's not a clearance engine then do it at least at the mfr's recommended interval or ideally before, age can be as important as mileage.

            Brian

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            • #7
              As mentioned, it differs with the car and the number of camshafts. The old Rabbit/Jetta/Golf, etc. was dead easy. I think it took about a half hour to do an 81 Volvo. Not much more than doing a fan belt. On the other hand, my twin cam Focus took a long time, and required special aligning tools and new cam pulley bolts.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MotorradMike View Post
                There is a video on here of Paul Compton changing the timing belt on a motorbike which I'll link up if I can find it.

                Here it is. Damn I'm good at this internet thing.
                Thanks for that!

                The Morini is a mostly non interference design. Most of the time you'll get away with a broken belt, but on the rare occasion that you get valve to piston contact, the pushrods are designed to shorten and prevent significant damage. I'd lent my 125 Morini to my friend Roy (whom you can see is not a small chap) to do the club trackday at Cadwell park this year.


                Half way through the third session the cambelt broke at 8000 odd rpm.
                A used belt was scrounged from a fellow club member and fitted in the paddock. Normal service was restored and the bike returned to the track.



                Timing belts allow accurate, light and inexpensive valve timing for high performance engines (power, economy, and emissions). When maintained properly, they're generally reliable. The old Mondeo turbo Diesel engines have flat top pistons and a flat head. A failed belt often results in a broken camshaft if not a completely destroyed head. Ford specified a 40,000 mile belt interval and most of the aftermarkey suppliers say 30,000 miles. Leave the belt much longer and they WILL fail! As a result the car was so unreliable that it's hard to find an example with less than 300,000 miles on the clock. No, hang on, wait a minute, I got that wrong. Most people changed the belts and it's not uncommon to see example with over 500,000 miles. Ford did come up with a new dynamic tensioner to replaced the fixed one and extended the belt life to 70,000 miles. The Mondeo TD or Duratorque belt is not technically difficult to change, but is a pig of a job with a lot of dismantling to do and poor access. I used to do the belt on a Fiat X1/9 in under an hour.

                Back in the late 90's I'd spend several weeks every year in California working on a race car. The prep was done in the corner of a family run automotive business and I was quite shocked at the level of neglect that was inflicted on quite new cars. Mike (the owner) had a box of broken belts under his desk to show customers that you couldn't determine if a belt was likely to fail just by looking at it. He still often failed to get the customer to book a belt change even though it was well beyond the service interval.
                Paul Compton
                www.morini-mania.co.uk
                http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                • #9
                  And Brits go on about fat Americans.

                  My 2003 Nissan Pathfinder uses a timing chain. I don't know what the reccomended replacement schedule is, but looking at the maintenance manual you have to dismantle the front of the car along with the front of the engine. I can't think of a worse engineered motor.
                  Last edited by Rustybolt; 12-05-2013, 09:40 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Try a Mazda 626. You have to remove one of the axles and hold the engine in the air with a lift or a brace. You do this because removing the axle forces you to remove a motor mount.

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                    • #11
                      On my 9 yr old VW Passat TDI PD runaround with 22k on the clock.... The VW garage quote was £380 , and a parts kit with new belt,tensioner and tools was £140. The belt is supposed to be changed every 4 yrs or 40,000 miles ..which ever comes first.

                      Rob

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                      • #12
                        The Donald is on a timing chain. Nothing in the book about changing it but recommends the tensioner be changed at 120,000.

                        According to the garage about an hours job but don't know what it entails.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          Locally, there are always VW Passats for sale with about 120K on the clock- which is when the timing belt change is due. It's a bear of a job- the entire bumper/grill assembly has to come off the car and then the radiator and AC condenser have to come out. Parts and labor are about $1000.

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                          • #14
                            Some Honda models use the belt to drive the water pump so if you have it done on a Honda, consider a new water pump as well.

                            I had a Vauxhall with the same arrangement, the water pump bearing failed and wrecked the engine, price of replacement engine meant car was a write off.
                            Dave

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                            • #15
                              Like everyone said it all depends what you are working on. Many aftermarket companies are offering "kits" now that include the belt, water pump, tensioners, etc. Its best practice to do everything while you are in there. What kind of car are you working on?

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