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straight shank vs. dedicated shank milling tools

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  • #16
    I found that you can't "torque" the draw bar down, once I figured out how tight I needed to make it, and not have ant tooling loosen up, I have not had a problem.
    It really tales a lot less tightening than one might think.
    Also I have removed the pin from my quill so there is no assist from it, just the torque fron the p/drawbar.

    THANX RICH
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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    • #17
      The way to get the tooling to pop out is have a captive drawbar. By having a means of keeping the top from going up, the tooling must go down. With manual or powered drawbar, this pushes the tool out of the taper when the drawbar is unscrewed. No hammering required.
      Kansas City area

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      • #18
        Having drill chucks on a 5/8" straight shank is just fine.
        I might use a 3/4" shank for slit saw arbors and shell
        mills. A straight shank in a collet is a better fuse than
        binding up and ruining a R-8 adapter. OK to have a
        boring head on a straight shank too. It is OCD tendencies
        that make one transfixed on having a taper arbor.
        Get over it and see how fine straight shank tooling works.
        It is not a 50 flange taper for all sakes.

        --Doozer
        DZER

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        • #19
          I use a ratcheting box end wrench on mine. Seems to work well and 90% of the time I can just tap the end of the drawbar with the side of the wrench and it pops free.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
            Having drill chucks on a 5/8" straight shank is just fine.
            I might use a 3/4" shank for slit saw arbors and shell
            mills. A straight shank in a collet is a better fuse than
            binding up and ruining a R-8 adapter. OK to have a
            boring head on a straight shank too. It is OCD tendencies
            that make one transfixed on having a taper arbor.
            Get over it and see how fine straight shank tooling works.
            It is not a 50 flange taper for all sakes.

            --Doozer
            Hi,

            Yep +1. Not to mention that a Bridgeport sized machine doesn't have enough where-with-all to even get that hard on straight shanked tools. The machine itself will start hopping around long before you will get enough deflection from the tool to be worried about.

            Save some money, buy cheaper straight shanks.

            dalee
            If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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            • #21
              I'd like to see that. Can you post a photo?



              Originally posted by v860rich View Post
              My power draw bar is a butterfly impact afixed atop the drawbar with a spring to lift it when not in use.
              I have never had to tap the drawbar since I installed the impact!!!

              THANX RICH
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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              • #22
                Since budget is such a significant concern for the O.P., then I'd say go for a straight-shank cutter simply because if you get a different mill later with a different spindle taper, you can still use it.

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