Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

DIY Mag Drill Pipe Drilling Base

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • DIY Mag Drill Pipe Drilling Base

    Wanted share my latest project.

    http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...78#post3561078

    R,
    HAP
    Who do I think you are...?

  • #2
    I think that's a well executed idea. Great craftsmanship too..well done Hap.

    Stuart

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow! What a classy looking piece of gear! Very nicely done, I'll bet you could not buy anything equivalent that is near that nicely made.
      Thanks for posting this, I love seeing this sort of stuff!

      Comment


      • #4
        Novel drill, never seen one like that before.
        I had a job getting mine as I wanted the drill version not the rotabroach version. managed to get one with a MT3 spindle but they are rare here.
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



        Comment


        • #5
          Good idea , practical and can be made to suit any drill, one suggestion drill a hole in the top to allow a cable to be fitted for lifting into position.
          Michael

          Comment


          • #6
            Really like the idea and now wonder if it can be made to use a "standard type" drill. I do a lot of "pipe holes" and I REALLY HATE using a hole saw to do it, but not a lot of choice when the pipe is hanging 20 ft in the air and CANT be brought down. Looked at small magnetic base drills, but damn they are expensive, and most wont work on the variety of pipe size I see (2" to 18" steel pipe). Have to bookmark this for future reference, as it would be nice to make a unit thats multi purpose (also in need of a coring drill, but those two are expensive).

            Comment


            • #7
              Just to confirm, it looks like the pin locks the sprocket for the gross adjustment and the threaded bolt/eye takes up the slack to tighten the mount to the pipe, correct?

              Slick!

              doug

              Comment


              • #8
                Very nice looking plate HAP! I am impressed with the chain attachment.

                Several years ago I had to drill holes in standing sports lighting poles for new crossarm locations. The holes had to go through both sides of the pole and be straight through so that the crossarms would sit straight on the pole. 2 holes per pole/6 poles. All at 60' in the air. I really dreaded trying to hand drill all those holes.

                I wound up buying a Champion RB32 Minibrute mag drill to do the job with. This mag drill has a number of nice features, one of which is it only weighs 28 lbs. Any way I built a pipe plate out of a 10" piece of 3" channel. I welded a 1/2" plate on top of the channel and secured the pipe plate to the pole with two 1.5" ratchet straps. This worked well as the magnetic base would hold the drill and the plate to the pole well enough so that I could then secure it with the straps.

                One other thing I did that you might want to consider was to attach a 5' safety chain to the mag drill and the pipe plate so that if the power failed the drill and plate wouldn't go all the way to the floor.

                Tim

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by michigan doug View Post
                  Just to confirm, it looks like the pin locks the sprocket for the gross adjustment and the threaded bolt/eye takes up the slack to tighten the mount to the pipe, correct?

                  Slick!

                  doug
                  You got it. Its nice to be able to pull the slack out in one motion and set the pin. It needed, I can add extra chain for larger pipe.
                  Who do I think you are...?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Very nice setup. I'm curious about the 1" feed depth. Does that mean you can't use conventional drill bits and need a special cutter for each size of hole? And perhaps different length cutters for different situations?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
                      Novel drill, never seen one like that before.
                      I had a job getting mine as I wanted the drill version not the rotabroach version. managed to get one with a MT3 spindle but they are rare here.
                      They (the MT3 jobbies) are also heavy! I had a nice one, Jancy 4x4, but some ba***rd stole it. Whoever it was must have been strong to carry it away from my place, with no road access!

                      Tim

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cameron View Post
                        Very nice setup. I'm curious about the 1" feed depth. Does that mean you can't use conventional drill bits and need a special cutter for each size of hole? And perhaps different length cutters for different situations?
                        cameron, 1" is what it is rated for. You can start out with spacers and remove them as you need to go deeper if you had to. I plan on making drill bit holders from scraps of 3/4" rounds that allows use of stubby bits held by set screws as required.
                        Who do I think you are...?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
                          Novel drill, never seen one like that before.
                          I had a job getting mine as I wanted the drill version not the rotabroach version. managed to get one with a MT3 spindle but they are rare here.
                          Mine has the MT3 native spindle with a Rotabroach adaptor, but it is VERY tall and heavy. Can't complain, it's an old design and an old machine - heck it was old when I got it, and that's probably best part of twenty years ago. I've replaced the vertical sliding shafts once due to wear and had to re-make the cover to the controls in that time but it owes me nothing.

                          Andrew

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by awemawson View Post
                            Mine has the MT3 native spindle with a Rotabroach adaptor, but it is VERY tall and heavy. Can't complain, it's an old design and an old machine - heck it was old when I got it, and that's probably best part of twenty years ago. I've replaced the vertical sliding shafts once due to wear and had to re-make the cover to the controls in that time but it owes me nothing.

                            Andrew
                            The 1" travel must be a limitation of the low profile design, the upright machines do usually offer quite a bit more.
                            As Andrew says, the ones with MT spindles tend to be very tall.
                            Here's the one I eventually found to replace the stolen Jancy, tapping holes in a flywheel to secure a ring gear.
                            That flywheel is 23" diameter, BTW.



                            Tim

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Timleech, that's just like the monster I rented and had to hold at head level on an 8' ladder... except it was red :-)
                              Who do I think you are...?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X