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Looking for a no weld solution to repair broken aluminum casting

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  • Looking for a no weld solution to repair broken aluminum casting

    Recently got a full top belt cover for my Atlas lathe but somehow after removing the old paint and moving it this appeared:



    Suppose I could find someone that could weld (I don't even know if it would require a certain type of welding...) the casting but was wondering... what about JB-Welding the parts together, smooth the join somewhat then laminate some carbon fiber cloth with epoxy? Any other ideas?

  • #2
    I recently repaired the cast aluminum gear cover from my SouthBend 9 with low temperature aluminum patch rods and a propane torch.
    The cover would have to be removed for cleaning and preparation but the patch rods do a pretty decent job on cast aluminum if done right.

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    • #3
      That would be an easy fix, you should have someone in your area that welds aluminum. Either JB or welding it will have to be cleaned really well to get the oil out of the metal. You don't say where you are but if you were close to Arizona I would do it for you I have fixed a number of cast al pieces. The last was a cast al step off a 4x4 lost over a year ago and just found all the pieces laying next to the rock that took it off.

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      • #4
        It looks as though you might have 1/4 inch of space on the inside of that break where you could apply a piece of aluminum without having it interfere with a gear or anything else. Drill holes above and below the break and matching holes in a bridge piece of aluminum. Chamfer the outside of them in the housing, and tap them in the bridge piece. Use JB weld in the break and liberally between the bridge piece and the housing, then screw it together with flat head bolts. Smooth the JB on the inside and fill the bolt heads, etc. Should be invisible once filled, sanded, and repainted.

        I think that will be a more permanent repair than adding a layer of fiber of some kind. The differing expansion ratios of materials will eventually allow the fiber layer to break free, although in a small repair area that might not happen.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          As long as you dont use that front piece as a handle it will never break off. Unless you can repair it correctly, welding, leave it alone.

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          • #6
            I'd plate it on the inside as Darryl says.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              Welding or Alu brazing (Lumiweld) would provide the greatest strength but the part doesn't look that thick and may well suffer from distortion could be an issue if it has to mate with other parts.
              I vote with John and Darryl, pop rivet/bolt a strap on the inside if theres enough room.

              Paul

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              • #8
                I recommended the patch as well on another forum. Also I mentioned if Bob likes he can send the cover to me for welding.
                Andy

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                • #9
                  The plate method is what I vote for but do not use JB Weld. Get a small tube of Fuzor adhesive and read the instructions on how to use it.
                  You can make up a simple dispenser for it instead of buying an expensive gun for it.
                  Works real well as we made a patch for a friends gravity box and installed it without welding to get him back to work.
                  Dan.

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                  • #10
                    I vote for welding. If you live anywhere near water where boats are run you can find an outboard motor repair shop that can weld aluminum. The aluminum skegs on outboard motors get broken off all the time and are repaired by welding.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the ideas guys, I'll get er done...

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