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Face Plates and Drive Plates

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  • Face Plates and Drive Plates

    Some time ago someone here posted a suggestion to a member wanting shaper info that they obtain the Ford Trade School book, Shop Theory. Owning a shaper myself, I decided to buy the book at the reasonable cost of about $9. I'm glad I did. Even as someone who has been machining for a while I've never attended a machine shop class and most of my knowledge has come from books, here and experience (trial and error). In any case, while browsing the book the lathe section names "two plates that are extensively used on the lathe" and proceeds to name the face plate and driving plate. While I am familiar with both the question came to mind, why use two plates? I have a nice face plate with slots (not T slots) that I use to bolt items to be machined to as well as to drive lathe dogs.
    So, now the question, why is it that Ford's book differentiates between the two? Is there some reason the face plate should not be used as I have been using it? Other than diameter and number of slots I see no real difference between the two. It seems duplicitous to me, but I know that I don't know what I don't know.

  • #2
    Diameter and number of slots is exactly "it".

    And the true dog driver plate commonly has a slot through the edge for the dog, while a faceplate has closed slots and a reasonably heavy rim. Some driver plates may have both a through slot and closed slots, with a heavier rim. Many have just the one slot, and no rim, and are considerably smaller.

    You can use a faceplate as a driver. It may not be as convenient. You can use some driver plates as faceplates, but an open slot makes them less rigid.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      You will generally find that driver plates have wider slots to accommodate the various dogs

      Rich

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      • #4
        They can both be used for either purpose, but each does its own a bit better.
        Don Young

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        • #5
          I remember reading in one old book the recommendation that the drive plate is used in order to save the faceplate for "nice work."
          Don't recall the source though., or if it mentioned that is the sole reason for the drive plate's existance.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the info guys. I knew the real machinists here would have the answers.

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            • #7
              A useful tip, especially those just starting out, which may be useful for those that are shall we say "lathe accessory challenged". When turning between centers you simply chuck up a piece of round and turn your 60 degree center on it. Place the dog on the work piece and drive it by one of the chuck jaws. This actually has a side benefit that the center you turned will be 100% spot on since it was turned in the very same lathe.
              Last edited by Ohio Mike; 12-19-2013, 06:35 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                This actually has a side benefit that the center you turned will be 100% spot on since it was turned in the very same lathe.
                True, but when I did my aprenticeship, we were taught that even if using a centre directly in the spindle with a driving plate, that the centre should be machined every time you insert it in the spindle. These centres are always soft for that purpose.
                Having said that, the only time I would take the chuck off and use a driving plate would be if the job was too long to fit between centres using a centre in the chuck.
                regards
                bollie7

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                • #9
                  I do the machined-in-place center also. But you do need to be sure it is very smoothly machined.... otherwise you will have more eccentricity than if you use a stock store-boughten center as-is.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                    A useful tip, especially those just starting out, which may be useful for those that are shall we say "lathe accessory challenged". When turning between centers you simply chuck up a piece of round and turn your 60 degree center on it. Place the dog on the work piece and drive it by one of the chuck jaws. This actually has a side benefit that the center you turned will be 100% spot on since it was turned in the very same lathe.
                    In this recent video on cutting multi-start threads, MrPete also demonstrates using such a self-made stub centre in chuck and faceplate. Note that he puts a shoulder on the centre, if it is to be held in chuck jaws, so it can't slip towards the headstock.

                    http://youtu.be/WqzhR96g6tk?t=9m36s

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