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  • Solder paste/ tinning compound

    I have been looking for what is known as solder paste or tinning compound. Basically ground up lead/tin solder mixed into paste flux. You spread it on, heat it and when the reaction is done you have a tinned surface ready to solder. An internet search shows that everybody in that type of industry makes it but apparently no one sells it.

    The last tin I bought was from a hardware store but I have been to everyone that I can find (HD, Lowes, Princess Auto, TSC and welding suppliers) and no one sells it anymore.

    Does anyone know of a chain store (Southwestern Ontario and eastern Michigan area) that sells the stuff. Ebay is not an option. Thanks.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

  • #2
    Is this the same thing as i have a few of "Kester" brand soldering paste tins??
    If so, how much do you need? I have a full one pound jar of it, never been used. (Sold previously by CTC , found it among some tools etc at a garage sale this summer.)

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    • #3
      I've purchased pretty much what you describe at Lowes. It was in a plastic "syringe" and hanging on a rack in the plumbing department next to the copper fillings.

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      • #4
        Around here it's called "C-Flux". Pretty common.

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        • #5
          The guys who do surface mount components on pcbs still need and use this stuff.

          here's a link, and it's not ebay...


          http://dx.com/p/lodestar-soldering-paste-50g-4711


          $3.37 and free shipping in the US.



          hth

          doug

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          • #6
            I didn't find it difficult to locate vendors. The first hit on a web search came up with http://www.digikey.com/product-searc...dering%20paste. Lots of choices there.

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            • #7
              Sasquatch, is that the solder bearing flux or just the regular flux.
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #8
                I looked up c-flux and that looks like it will do it doesn't have lead but I can live with that, I just have to find it, or something like it. I don't know why it is so hard to find here anymore.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #9
                  Here's what it states:

                  When soldering with an iron: Clean area to be soldered down to bare metal.
                  File tip clean before tinning. Tin by dipping hot iron into paste and applying solder to iron.
                  Heat soldering area untill it is hot enough to melt solder .
                  Solder following basic soldering procedures.
                  Any help?

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                  • #10
                    Sound like it is ordinary flux, thanks.

                    The new stuff that is used in electronic work usually has a life of 6 months (spec sheets) if kept refrigerated. My 20 year old tin is still good but it is simpler, basically for plumbing and metal work.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok, no problem, wondering if you try a shop, were they make sheet metal items, one we had here used to solder up copper and brass items for customers.

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                      • #12
                        I can get Oatey #95 tinning flux around here but it says for copper use and lead free solder only. I may bite the bullet and see if it will work on steel which is my main usage.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Lol, ok, but now you have to tell us what your'e building.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                            I can get Oatey #95 tinning flux around here but it says for copper use and lead free solder only. I may bite the bullet and see if it will work on steel which is my main usage.
                            A product meant for copper, or noble metals, isn't going to work well on steel or galvanized. For those you need an acid flux. The "old school" acid fluxes I used to use with lead based solder don't seem to work to well with the lead free solders you get now. I suppose I should look into more up to date fluxes for those before my remaining supply of lead based solder runs out.

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                            • #15
                              From Oatey's #95 product pdf:

                              COMMON APPLICATIONS
                              Oatey No. 95 Tinning Flux can be used to solder most commonly
                              soldered metals including copper, brass, zinc, galvanized iron and
                              tin or copper-coated metals.
                              Consult Oatey Technical Department for applications not
                              specifically referenced above.
                              NOT FOR USE WITH ALUMINUM, STAINLESS STEEL OR
                              MAGNESIUM. DO NOT USE ON ELECTRICAL PARTS.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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