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30 Ton Press Project, a monster or how to over build it.

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  • 30 Ton Press Project, a monster or how to over build it.

    The first part of this thread will be an overview of this project up to now 12-25-2013.
    I started this project in March of 2013, roughly nine months ago. The winter is the slow time here for me, so I started the project to press some bushing out of a few hydraulic cylinders.
    To make a long story short I used a friends press to replace the bushings and settled down to design and build the press I really wanted.
    The build is documented in this thread over on SFT, Pressing project.
    I had a bunch of fits and starts on this project, plus delays on OPP (Other Peoples Projects). So for the last few days the build has started up again.
    A few pictures of the materials used.

    12" X 20.1# channel Was going to use 7" channel but I did not have enough of it in inventory.

    4 "X 3-1/2" X 3/8" angle for the feet.

    Clips for mounting the feet.

    W6 X 15# beam for the legs.
    More in next post.
    Dan.

  • #2
    More photos.

    Ready to cut pin holes there are twenty holes in each leg. I am using a Champion CT7 Carbide tipped hole saw in 1-1/4"

    Pin holes done.

    Foot mounting clips welded in.

    Spreader bar mounting plates.
    More photos in next post.
    Dan.

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    • #3
      More photos.

      Feet mounted.

      2" 150# flanges for the spreader bar.

      Frame almost welded up.

      Spreader bar plates welded on.
      More photos in the next post.
      Dan.

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      • #4
        More photos.

        Welding the flanges to 2" pipe for to make the spreader bar. Left side.

        Welding the right side flange for the spreader bar.
        This is just a sampling of the photos from the complete thread here
        I will post up the progress as it happens.
        The frame is almost done, I have to flip it over to finish the welds on the other side of the legs. Once those welds are done I will finish the feet and install them on the frame then i can roll it into the shop. And start on the trolley for the jack that will be the power unit.
        With the header, table, legs and feet the materials weigh over 650# so far, that weight does not include the plate for the spreader bar, flanges, pipe or the foot mounting clips.
        Dan.
        Last edited by Lu47Dan; 12-25-2013, 10:13 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Lu47Dan View Post
          Ready to cut pin holes there are twenty holes in each leg.
          I am using a Champion CT7 Carbide tipped hole saw in 1-1/4"
          While I have Lenox bi-metal hole saws and Hougen annular
          cutters for smaller diameters in thinner material, I have shied
          away from projects involving accurate holes in heavier sections.

          The Champion saw appears to do a nice job in those beams for you.
          From the setting, I assume the holes were done freehand, rather
          than in a machine. How large/powerful a drill is required to drive
          carbide-tipped saws of that diameter?

          Edit: Looking again, I now see the photo of the beam on the mill
          table and the Champion saw in the quill.
          Last edited by EddyCurr; 12-26-2013, 12:43 PM.

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          • #6
            Looked to me as he had the saw mounted in a Bridgeport so yes i suppose it was as good as free hand.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              That looks to be a nice press, should handle anything you could throw at it.
              Would hate to have to move that thing around!

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              • #8
                I got a set of casters good for 1000lb each, and sure makes moving the monster I made around a lot easier (although mine only weights about 1000lbs)

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                • #9
                  Looks like you made pretty good use of that white coolant-
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    Eddy, I have run them with a Milwaukee Hole Shooter Drill, they run real well in lower powered equipment.
                    Yes the saw is mounted in my M-Head Bridgeport.
                    John, the mill worked perfectly for this job.
                    Kendall, I am going to install a set of casters on the press once it is finished, I figure it will weigh in at about 1500lbs once I am all done.
                    Stern, the press should handle an upgrade to 50ton in the future.
                    Darryl, yep the white stuff makes pretty good coolant.

                    Today, I got the frame flipped over so I can do the welding on the other side. I had other things to do today so all I got done was to flip the frame and cover it back up.

                    Frame flipped over.
                    Dan.
                    Last edited by Lu47Dan; 12-26-2013, 06:44 PM.

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                    • #11
                      The drill must have caught fire, looks like airport foam everywhere lol, cant be that, whats it called snoow or somthing
                      Your building an extruder not a press!
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by boslab View Post
                        The drill must have caught fire, looks like airport foam everywhere lol, cant be that, whats it called snoow or somthing
                        Your building an extruder not a press!
                        Mark
                        Mark, yep snow, only a little, about 2"-3" on the ground. Low temperature last night was 12°F, today's high was 34°F. Snow will most likely melt over the next two days.
                        As to the extruder, it might work.
                        Dan.

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                        • #13
                          Not to rain on your accomplishment but I wonder if you considered paint and finish before you started welding?

                          It's FAR easier to go over the rusty structural steel with a stiff 4" wire cup wheel then a 50 grit disk to remove the rust and loose scale, dust off the dings and bruises, detail edges and radii etc before you begin assembly. This saves tedious methods for getting into corners to clean up the ugly after weld. The paint goed on smoother and adheres better too. Plus, your wellding will be made that much easier; weld quality affcted by material surface cleanliness.

                          Don't get me wrong, you're doing a fine job in a sensible sequence but cleaning and pre-detailing the material before assembly halves the post-welding paint prep time.
                          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 12-28-2013, 01:38 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Good point, though I'd clean it and coat it with a self-etching weldable primer. Finish coats should wait for the welding to be done.

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                            • #15
                              Forrest & j, I hit the insides if the header channel with a 7" flap disc to remove the loose paint and rust before I welded them to the legs. Once the press is finished I will be sending the frame out to sandblasting.
                              Dan.

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