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OT: REAL hominy grits

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  • #16
    Originally posted by dp View Post
    Grits is coarse ground masa (nixtamal) that has first had the hulls removed. Grind grits and you get no-hull masa harina. Masa and masa harina are well known outside the south and one is more likely to find coarse ground masa by asking for coarse ground masa than by asking for grits.

    Edit: You can also prepare your own nixtamal and grind grits: http://www.greensense.com/Features/G...e/nixtamal.htm
    Now there are two ideas - I wonder if adding a tablespoon or two of masa (harina, which I've got in the pantry) to the stone ground corn grits would bring back that old fashioned flavor without making them gooey?

    And so maybe we'll just have to grind our own. We make our own bread, and cheese, and beer, -- I guess I'll have to add a grain mill to the "shop tools" budget.
    Kevin

    More tools than sense.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
      Grits are an awful thing concocted in the south in an effort to keep us snowbirds away from their warm climate. They don't actually eat the stuff. I should think it's on a par with Haggis. Bob.
      Obviously, you've never had properly prepared grits. Next time you're in New England, stop by. We'll talk shop and have steak and grits for dinner.

      PS: I do agree with you about haggis. I've tried it and offal is awful.
      Kevin

      More tools than sense.

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      • #18
        Like many Brits I wondered for years after seeing My Cousin Vinney what grits were. Thought they must be like a yam cake or something until I found them on the breakfast menu in a Chicago hotel. Turned out to be just semolina! however the references above to hash browns makes me think they can sometimes be prepared with minimal water and fried? Coarse porridge is much better and haggis is delicious.

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        • #19
          Am I the only one that read the title as "REAL horny girls"?

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          • #20
            Yes, grits can be prepared many, many ways, just as polenta. Made with less water, poured into a loaf pan, chilled, cut into slices and sauted in butter. Mmmmmm.

            PS: Semolina is made from wheat (Durham), both grits and polenta are made from corn.
            Kevin

            More tools than sense.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
              Am I the only one that read the title as "REAL horny girls"?

              YES. I already have one of those (and have had for over 40 years)!
              Kevin

              More tools than sense.

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              • #22
                I sometimes add masa to chili to give it an old Mexico flavor. It does thicken the sauce some as it is intended to make tortillas. Fried, it makes great chips for salsa. Two tablespoons of masa in a gallon of chili is very noticeable.

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                • #23
                  Interesting thread. Having tried grits I consider them inedible - like okra or tripe - haggis on the other hand is delicious and available in St. Louis at the right place.
                  "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by dp View Post
                    Technically, there is no solid definition of what grits means as it has regional variation. (snip)
                    Yes that's confusing. To some "masa" means dough and needs a qualifier to denote whether corn or wheat.

                    Having lived and worked throughout the south and eaten diner and home cooked grits, my definition of grits is hominy that has been cracked to a size between rice and raisins that when well prepared is creamy yet has some tooth.

                    I make it like Lynnl's grandmother and the Inca. Needn't be industrial.

                    Polenta, at least the Italian style, can't be compared even if the texture is the same as it lacks the alkali treatment.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Carm View Post
                      Having lived and worked throughout the south and eaten diner and home cooked grits, my definition of grits is hominy that has been cracked to a size between rice and raisins that when well prepared is creamy yet has some tooth. Polenta, at least the Italian style, can't be compared even if the texture is the same as it lacks the alkali treatment.
                      YES. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

                      Looks like another do it yourself project. I guess its sort of like why we have shops; if you want it right, or maybe different, ya gotta do it yourself.
                      Kevin

                      More tools than sense.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        This was passed down from my Grandmother in Pennsylvania Dutch country.

                        When we butcher hogs leave lots of meat on the bones.
                        Cook them down until it falls apart. separate the bones and grind the cooked meat.
                        Put it back in the broth and add the spices you like. Mexican,Italian,German spices...your choice.
                        Bring to a boil and keep adding grits until its too thick to stir. Pour into breadpans, chill and slice thick as bread.
                        Griddle fry like pancakes, either butter,salt& pepper or something sweet like syrup.

                        Part of my Sunday breakfast for years.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
                          Grits are an awful thing concocted in the south in an effort to keep us snowbirds away from their warm climate. They don't actually eat the stuff. I should think it's on a par with Haggis. Bob.
                          No, northerners don't eat grits, they eat greasy hash browns. I'll stay with my grits.

                          I am not a grits expert, but I do eat them every morning. One bowl of grits and three strips of turkey bacon: that's my breakfast. My daughter says if I ever need a transfusion, they will need a bag of grits.

                          Personal opinion is the Three Minute brand is the best available in the local (south Texas) groceries. They do have the word "hominy" on the package but I do not know how that relates to the real thing.

                          As for the taste, they are fairly bland by themselves: cream of wheat with a mild corn flavor is probably the best description I can do. But that is not fair because I do not like cream of wheat. I usually add butter flavor and cheese (or cheese flavor). I have to watch my diet and they fit well. A quarter cup of dry grits, before adding water and cooking, gives me 140 calories; 0.5 grams of fat; 0 saturated fat, cholesterol, & sugar; 125 mg of salt, and 1 gram of carbohydrates. Beats the pants off greasy hash browns.

                          Those numbers are for the way I cook standard grits, using only water and do not include any additions. I consider them to be a healthy breakfast.

                          One more thing. There is a product called "instant grits". They are NOT grits and the manufacturer's should be sued for using the word on the package. Oh, and they do not cook even one second faster than regular grits so the use of the word "instant" is also a falsehood. Both "cook" in three to four minutes if you count the time to boil the water for the instant product.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by KJ1I View Post
                            Yes, grits can be prepared many, many ways, just as polenta. Made with less water, poured into a loaf pan, chilled, cut into slices and sauted in butter. Mmmmmm.

                            PS: Semolina is made from wheat (Durham), both grits and polenta are made from corn.

                            Many old southern cooks, one of my aunts included, will slice the chilled grits that are left over from breakfast and will fry it for a later meal. As a child, I was quite surprised by fried grits when I said that I liked grits at dinner time. I surprised her by explaining that grits can be rewarmed if a little water is added.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                            • #29
                              Hell, I eat grits about twice a week, I also make my own Hominy from White Hickory corn, I grow here.
                              I use the cold soak method instead of using hot water, hot water in a stone crock is not a good idea. I have made up to 60 pints of hominy at a time.
                              Grits, a slice of ham, and two sunny side up eggs make for a great breakfast.
                              Dan.

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                              • #30
                                Very interesting thread. Polenta is available here but grits are something we surface our roads with. I intend to buy some corn and try these recipes.
                                Haggis is delicious, you have to go north of Hadrians wall to get the proper stuff, best taken with a large dram or two, very nice indeed!
                                Does anyone have a good recipe for possum belly pie?
                                Dave

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