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OT: REAL hominy grits

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  • #31
    A civilized breakfast, Hawaiian style:

    A generous scoop of Calrose rice in a bowl
    A patty of ground round or a couple rectangles of SPAM, fried, placed on top of the rice
    An egg, fried over medium, placed on the meat
    A scoop of beef gravy over the top of everything

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    • #32
      Just to ad to the confusion to people who do not know!
      When you speak of " Corn "
      In English speaking countries Mais is Corn.
      In German Corn is Rye. Corn Bread would be Rye Bread. US Corn is Mais in German ' Mais Brot " and the word Corn is a kernel .
      I believe in the northern countries the word Corn becomes Oat .
      And "stone ground" is better is a myth. I can come to the same product with Rollers as 99.9 % of the Mills do it .

      Hilmar

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      • #33
        Originally posted by dp View Post
        A civilized breakfast, Hawaiian style:

        A generous scoop of Calrose rice in a bowl
        A patty of ground round or a couple rectangles of SPAM, fried, placed on top of the rice
        An egg, fried over medium, placed on the meat
        A scoop of beef gravy over the top of everything
        That sounds pretty damn good actually!

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        • #34
          It's called loco moco in the islands and it is pretty damn good, for sure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loco_Moco

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          • #35
            Ok now I have a reason to go.

            Heck I went to Canada just to experience "real" poutine I'm sure I can justify this.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by WhatTheFlux! View Post
              Ok now I have a reason to go.

              Heck I went to Canada just to experience "real" poutine I'm sure I can justify this.
              No need to go to Canada. Go to the Isle of Man and ask for "chips, cheese and gravy". It's where the poutine originally came from...

              On grits / semolina / polenta, etc - I prefer Flahavan's Progress Oatlets for breakfast, myself. Make them with half-milk-half water and some salt. Serve with milk or cream and sugar. Delicious!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Euph0ny View Post
                No need to go to Canada. Go to the Isle of Man and ask for "chips, cheese and gravy". It's where the poutine originally came from.!
                ..........and then there's chip butties in Blackpool.
                "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Euph0ny View Post
                  On grits / semolina / polenta, etc - I prefer Flahavan's Progress Oatlets for breakfast, myself. Make them with half-milk-half water and some salt. Serve with milk or cream and sugar. Delicious!
                  And another topic altogether -- the difference between "steel cut", "pinhead", or "Irish" oats (or oatmeal) served with cream and brown sugar and "American" aka "Quaker" steamed mashed wall paper paste ! Flahavan's pinheads are a pantry staple.
                  Kevin

                  More tools than sense.

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                  • #39
                    Hmmmm....why not we just enjoy our grits/grains, whatevers in a hoisted glass, 100 proof...The New Year is coming.
                    gvasale

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                    • #40
                      For Christmas I was given a half pint of the smoothest home brew corn whiskey I have ever tasted.
                      I will be toasting you on New Years Eve.
                      I will not be posting anything here until late on New Years Day.

                      It lights with a match.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                        This was passed down from my Grandmother in Pennsylvania Dutch country.

                        When we butcher hogs leave lots of meat on the bones.
                        Cook them down until it falls apart. separate the bones and grind the cooked meat.
                        Put it back in the broth and add the spices you like. Mexican,Italian,German spices...your choice.
                        Bring to a boil and keep adding grits until its too thick to stir. Pour into breadpans, chill and slice thick as bread.
                        Griddle fry like pancakes, either butter,salt& pepper or something sweet like syrup.

                        Part of my Sunday breakfast for years.
                        That's a different subject too.
                        I'm in southcentral Pa. now. The above is called "scrapple" here. The Amish call it ponhaus. Uses everything except the squeal. The cereal added to the pork trimmings is usually cormeal (not treated).
                        Go a little west or north and they use buckwheat alone or with the cornmeal.

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                        • #42
                          Intresting project

                          The owner of a RV park that we frequent has a Hit-and-miss engine on an old corn grinder.​It is interesting to watch it work.
                          Byron Boucher
                          Burnet, TX

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                          • #43
                            I've tried some from these folks-
                            http://palmettofarms.com/Stone-Groun...ite-Grits.html

                            and these-
                            http://www.louisianapridegristmill.c...ound-grits.php

                            Both are good IMO with a price prefrence towards the latter.I haven't bought any in a few years though as a family friend grows Shoepeg corn and grinds his own.

                            As I have witnessed there are people who "cook" Grits and people who "soak" Grits.I am squarely in the soak colum.All I ever do is bring them to a boil,cover and shut the heat off then come back about 15 or so minutes later.IMO Grits are as much about the consistency as flavor.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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                            • #44
                              this thread makes me hungry.
                              san jose, ca. usa

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                              • #45
                                I use the Palmetto Farms grits and find them to be pretty good. They are uniformly ground and screened to remove the fines. I take issue with the Louisiana Pride Grist mill page stating that white grits are made from hulled yellow corn. That is definitely not true. White grits are made from white corn. White corn is not grown commercially except in a few places in the South where it is used exclusively for white corn meal and grits.

                                I tried Anson Mills so called "Antebellum Coarse Grits" ( http://ansonmills.com/products) The grind is inconsistent and there are lots of fines mixed in. The flavor is good, however they take at last 30( 45 is better) min. to cook. Anson Mills is the current darling of several TV chefs. So far, I'm staying with Palmetto farms after trying several other internet sources.

                                RWO

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