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OT: REAL hominy grits

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  • KJ1I
    replied
    Just make your own. Homemade is always better --

    Iowa Farm Sausage

    40 oz. Pork butt
    8 oz. Fat back
    1 1/2 T. Rubbed sage
    1 1/2 T. Dried tarragon
    1 T. Powdered ginger
    2 tsp. Kosher salt
    2 tsp. Dried basil
    1 tsp. Freshly ground black pepper
    1 tsp. Ground dried Thai Dragon pepper (optional)
    3 oz. Finely minced onions
    0.5 oz. Finely chopped fresh parsley
    2 Cloves garlic, crushed
    2 oz. Cold water

    Grind the pork and fat back using a medium small (1/4”) blade. In a small bowl, combine the dried spices. In a large bowl, mix the ground pork with the combined spices and the onions, parsley, and garlic. Knead and squeeze the mixture until well blended. Package in 8 ounce portions. Keeps in the refrigerator for 3 days or in the freezer for 3 months.

    Sausage Gravy

    8 oz. Pork sausage
    6 oz. Diced onions
    8 oz. Milk
    8 oz. Light cream
    1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
    Prepared roux

    Brown the sausage in a large frying pan. Add the onions and sauté until translucent. Add the milk, cream, and salt and bring to a boil. Stir in the roux, reduce the heat, and cook until thickened.

    Note: The quantity of roux is not specified. This is to allow you to thicken the gravy to your desired consistency. Some like the gravy to be as thick as wall paper paste, others the consistence of pancake batter. Start with 1 tablespoon and allow to cook for about 2 minutes. Add more, a small amount at a time, until the gravy reaches the desired thickness. Be aware it will thicken more as it cools.


    Buttermilk Biscuits

    8 oz. All purpose flour
    4 oz. Pastry flour
    0.5 oz. Granulated sugar
    1 oz. Baking powder
    1/4 tsp. Baking soda
    1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
    1.5 oz. Vegetable shortening
    0.5 oz. Butter
    6 oz. Buttermilk

    Sift together the flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Cut in the shortening and butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the buttermilk to the flour all at once. Stir just enough to make a soft dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll or pat out to 3/4” thick and cut with a 2 1/2” round cutter. Bake at 425° F on an ungreased baking sheet for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.

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  • BigMike782
    replied
    Soaking corn in lye does not make me hungry. Being a northern boy I'm sure my exposure has not been the best but I have had grits,probably from a can or a box, and they are ok with some jelly or butter and brown sugar.
    There is an Amish place the wife and I like that has fried corn meal mush,sometimes I feel like I have eaten my weight of the stuff it's so good.

    Hash browns are greasy in restaurants because the need to be cooked fast so they add grease.I like mine dry with some onions thrown in.
    Now if I could find a place that makes sausage gravy from scratch I'd be on my way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I have to really agree on the consistency thing. Nothing worse than watery or lumpy grits. Should stick to the spoon or fork and be lump free. But the flavor thing is important too. Some brands are too bland with no flavor at all.


    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    I've tried some from these folks-
    http://palmettofarms.com/Stone-Groun...ite-Grits.html

    and these-
    http://www.louisianapridegristmill.c...ound-grits.php

    Both are good IMO with a price prefrence towards the latter.I haven't bought any in a few years though as a family friend grows Shoepeg corn and grinds his own.

    As I have witnessed there are people who "cook" Grits and people who "soak" Grits.I am squarely in the soak colum.All I ever do is bring them to a boil,cover and shut the heat off then come back about 15 or so minutes later.IMO Grits are as much about the consistency as flavor.

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  • RWO
    replied
    I use the Palmetto Farms grits and find them to be pretty good. They are uniformly ground and screened to remove the fines. I take issue with the Louisiana Pride Grist mill page stating that white grits are made from hulled yellow corn. That is definitely not true. White grits are made from white corn. White corn is not grown commercially except in a few places in the South where it is used exclusively for white corn meal and grits.

    I tried Anson Mills so called "Antebellum Coarse Grits" ( http://ansonmills.com/products) The grind is inconsistent and there are lots of fines mixed in. The flavor is good, however they take at last 30( 45 is better) min. to cook. Anson Mills is the current darling of several TV chefs. So far, I'm staying with Palmetto farms after trying several other internet sources.

    RWO

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  • gambler
    replied
    this thread makes me hungry.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    I've tried some from these folks-
    http://palmettofarms.com/Stone-Groun...ite-Grits.html

    and these-
    http://www.louisianapridegristmill.c...ound-grits.php

    Both are good IMO with a price prefrence towards the latter.I haven't bought any in a few years though as a family friend grows Shoepeg corn and grinds his own.

    As I have witnessed there are people who "cook" Grits and people who "soak" Grits.I am squarely in the soak colum.All I ever do is bring them to a boil,cover and shut the heat off then come back about 15 or so minutes later.IMO Grits are as much about the consistency as flavor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boucher
    replied
    Intresting project

    The owner of a RV park that we frequent has a Hit-and-miss engine on an old corn grinder.​It is interesting to watch it work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carm
    replied
    Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
    This was passed down from my Grandmother in Pennsylvania Dutch country.

    When we butcher hogs leave lots of meat on the bones.
    Cook them down until it falls apart. separate the bones and grind the cooked meat.
    Put it back in the broth and add the spices you like. Mexican,Italian,German spices...your choice.
    Bring to a boil and keep adding grits until its too thick to stir. Pour into breadpans, chill and slice thick as bread.
    Griddle fry like pancakes, either butter,salt& pepper or something sweet like syrup.

    Part of my Sunday breakfast for years.
    That's a different subject too.
    I'm in southcentral Pa. now. The above is called "scrapple" here. The Amish call it ponhaus. Uses everything except the squeal. The cereal added to the pork trimmings is usually cormeal (not treated).
    Go a little west or north and they use buckwheat alone or with the cornmeal.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1-800miner
    replied
    For Christmas I was given a half pint of the smoothest home brew corn whiskey I have ever tasted.
    I will be toasting you on New Years Eve.
    I will not be posting anything here until late on New Years Day.

    It lights with a match.

    Leave a comment:


  • gvasale
    replied
    Hmmmm....why not we just enjoy our grits/grains, whatevers in a hoisted glass, 100 proof...The New Year is coming.

    Leave a comment:


  • KJ1I
    replied
    Originally posted by Euph0ny View Post
    On grits / semolina / polenta, etc - I prefer Flahavan's Progress Oatlets for breakfast, myself. Make them with half-milk-half water and some salt. Serve with milk or cream and sugar. Delicious!
    And another topic altogether -- the difference between "steel cut", "pinhead", or "Irish" oats (or oatmeal) served with cream and brown sugar and "American" aka "Quaker" steamed mashed wall paper paste ! Flahavan's pinheads are a pantry staple.

    Leave a comment:


  • jep24601
    replied
    Originally posted by Euph0ny View Post
    No need to go to Canada. Go to the Isle of Man and ask for "chips, cheese and gravy". It's where the poutine originally came from.!
    ..........and then there's chip butties in Blackpool.

    Leave a comment:


  • Euph0ny
    replied
    Originally posted by WhatTheFlux! View Post
    Ok now I have a reason to go.

    Heck I went to Canada just to experience "real" poutine I'm sure I can justify this.
    No need to go to Canada. Go to the Isle of Man and ask for "chips, cheese and gravy". It's where the poutine originally came from...

    On grits / semolina / polenta, etc - I prefer Flahavan's Progress Oatlets for breakfast, myself. Make them with half-milk-half water and some salt. Serve with milk or cream and sugar. Delicious!

    Leave a comment:


  • WhatTheFlux!
    replied
    Ok now I have a reason to go.

    Heck I went to Canada just to experience "real" poutine I'm sure I can justify this.

    Leave a comment:


  • dp
    replied
    It's called loco moco in the islands and it is pretty damn good, for sure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loco_Moco

    Leave a comment:

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