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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    No think I'm sorted on this one, need to talk to the customer after the holiday

    Leave a comment:


  • Zadig
    replied
    John, I took your request for help as a rhetorical one, are you actually looking for specific info?

    Leave a comment:


  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    If it's the set in 5 parts then got them all.
    Trouble is often times a reprint carries a different name.

    Got two books here with different names and covers but the text is the same in both.
    Dunno, it only mentions 'Section 1' which is mainly mathematical tables relevant to gear design, and 'Section 2' which covers spur and internal gears.

    Written by Earle Buckingham, Cambridge, Mass., Industrial Press, 1937

    Edit - looks as though it's still available:-

    http://www.amazon.com/Manual-Gear-De.../dp/0831131160

    Tim
    Last edited by Timleech; 12-30-2013, 03:45 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    If it's the set in 5 parts then got them all.
    Trouble is often times a reprint carries a different name.

    Got two books here with different names and covers but the text is the same in both.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    Many thanks for that but I do have a copy.

    Sad bastard that I am i probably have over 100 books of gears and gearing.
    problem is most contain the same info so distilled down those 100 will probably make 5 or 6 unique books.

    Trouble is there is always a loose gem in most of them.
    Have you got any of the American Gear Manufacturers' design manuals?
    I've got section three, on helical & spiral gears, could lend or sell it to you if of interest.

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • lakeside53
    replied
    Changing his name to "little teddy bear" might cause even more problems at the local pub

    Leave a comment:


  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    Anyone know where I can get a 44.53 DP gear cutter ?
    John, you need one more machine for your shop, a CNC Shaper
    A machine where all things are possible !

    Rich
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 12-30-2013, 01:34 PM. Reason: spelling

    Leave a comment:


  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    John do you remember a short time ago a female teacher was threatened with death for allowing a student to call his little teddy bear mohammedIit caused quite a diplomatic explosion at the time it is funny how angry some muslims are over such things but there we have it. Alistair

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    Quite so, actually.

    John, you're getting deeper into the world these days such that it might interest you to investigate a book recently authored by Alex Kapelevich, titled "Direct Gear Design". You're venturing into that area now, where the application dictates gear tooth geometry instead of artificial standards. He's wonderfully intelligent man, very generous with his knowledge and advice, but has a business to run, like anyone else. I've had the pleasure of being involved in projects he was also involved in and always came away learning more than I expected. Might I suggest you read his book and the white papers he's made freely available? As to your question, regardless of the rhetorical humor possibly intended, I've done exactly this a few times in the recent past with WEDM. Let me know if I can be of any assistance, Old Sod.

    Many thanks for that but I do have a copy.

    Sad bastard that I am i probably have over 100 books of gears and gearing.
    problem is most contain the same info so distilled down those 100 will probably make 5 or 6 unique books.

    Trouble is there is always a loose gem in most of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnAlex141r
    replied
    Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    Quite so, actually.

    John, you're getting deeper into the world these days such that it might interest you to investigate a book recently authored by Alex Kapelevich, titled "Direct Gear Design". ...
    Gear Head;

    Thanks for the pointer to Alex Kapelevich; interesting site.

    Another JohnS.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    Anyone know where I can get a 44.53 DP gear cutter ?
    Don't need no stinkin gear cutter when you have gearotic, just take a small ball endmill and go at it !

    Leave a comment:


  • Zahnrad Kopf
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    Anyone know where I can get a 44.53 DP gear cutter ?
    Originally posted by Don Young View Post
    I would not be surprised to learn that there are more 'non-standard' gears in the world than 'standard' ones.
    Quite so, actually.

    John, you're getting deeper into the world these days such that it might interest you to investigate a book recently authored by Alex Kapelevich, titled "Direct Gear Design". You're venturing into that area now, where the application dictates gear tooth geometry instead of artificial standards. He's wonderfully intelligent man, very generous with his knowledge and advice, but has a business to run, like anyone else. I've had the pleasure of being involved in projects he was also involved in and always came away learning more than I expected. Might I suggest you read his book and the white papers he's made freely available? As to your question, regardless of the rhetorical humor possibly intended, I've done exactly this a few times in the recent past with WEDM. Let me know if I can be of any assistance, Old Sod.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don Young
    replied
    I would think that the button method of making a gear cutter would be suitable for any pitch as long as you do the math correctly. Cutting a helical hob should be doable if you can get the lathe to do the right lead. Cutting a straight rack type hob should be very easy.

    I would not be surprised to learn that there are more 'non-standard' gears in the world than 'standard' ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike4
    replied
    John ,
    Thanks for the extra info that makes you dilemma a bit clearer.

    How many of these do you have to manufacture, small lots could be approximated by grinding an end mill to the pitch and cutting them .
    I have repaired a couple of smaller ones that way for a machine thats no longer made.

    The end mill was a learning curve , by that I had never ground a taper and sharpened the flutes to make them cut steel again , its some where in the workshop under a mountain of other crap.
    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Michael,
    I can't change the design to use standard cutters.

    I have a fixed ratio I have to keep and a semi fixed centre distance between the two gear shafts.
    Because there are 4 gears in two different ratio's if I make one a standard set of gears the other ratio is way out.
    It's took about 3 hours of spreadsheet work and using Gearotic to come up with what i have so far.

    There are two more ratio's that will give me the final one needed but the disparity between the two trains is that big they can't share a common idler shaft.

    I can do it easier with internal gears but I don't have the room for big numbers.

    Leave a comment:

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