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2pt Epoxy in Syringe Dispenser - Shelf Life after 1st Use ?

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  • 2pt Epoxy in Syringe Dispenser - Shelf Life after 1st Use ?

    After not using epoxy in a long time, I have a need.
    However, upon looking at choices available, I find
    that the resin and hardener is commonly packed
    together in a syringe that promises equal portions
    and thorough mixing.

    Are these effectively single-use applicators? Or are
    they able to dispense portions and then be stored
    for weeks until the next job presents itself? If the
    latter, are they ready to go or is cleaning/clearing
    of the mixer section typically necessary before the
    materials will flow?

    With the traditional two-tube approach, shelf life
    was eff indefinate. Never noticed a problem w/
    mixing small portions.

    .

  • #2
    I use the 5 minute 2 part epoxy in the syringes all the time. It does dispense equal amounts, but you have to squirt it on a piece of metal and mix it with an old screwdriver before applying it to anything. Shelf life of stuff remaining in the twin syringes lasts almost indefinitely.---brian
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #3
      They don't mix in the container. Depending on the design you just squirt some out on a flat surface and mix or install a mixing tube on the outlet and it mixes when you dispense. Either way they are good for multiple applications.

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      • #4
        Some brands are more shelf-stable than others. You may have to try several kinds before you find your ideal.

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        • #5
          I was under the impression there is a swirl agitation mixing action
          taking place in the syringe needle and expected that material left
          here would harden, blocking future use. Guess not.

          FWIW, since posting I discovered LePage offers a carded prod called
          Speed Set Professional Epoxy where the resin/hardener comes in discrete
          118 ml containers.

          I'll give one of the syringe packaged products a try.

          Thanks,
          Ken R.

          .

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          • #6
            There are single-shot dispensers like you describe. I have had little luck getting them to remain useable.

            I keep a couple of tubes of epoxy on hand (wood-specialty, metal-specialty, and plastic-specialty) and the corresponding hardener. I find for what I do this is more than sufficient.

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            • #7
              The dispense and mix (via a swirl tube) types are one time use. In a like manner there are larger systems with a disposable mixing nozzle, which is discarded after use.

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              • #8
                The twin tubes have been disappointing long term for me. I have found at the box stores a Loctite epoxy in two squeeze bottles. Easy to use and ready the next time. Also a LOT more epoxy than the twin tubes. For about fifteen bucks more cost effective. Bob.

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                • #9
                  In my experience, the syringes do dispense equally the first few times. But then invariably one or the other dispensing tubes will get partially clogged so the proportions become unequal.
                  As for shelf life, I've had success even years after first opening. It's always the clogging that prompts me to discard the whole unit. Tho I probably have occasionally noticed slower curing from real old stuff.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    I would advise that you visit a hobby shop. There is something called 'quick cure', which comes in separate tubes. It's available in a couple of sizes, plus different setting times. One is a 5 minute, another is 15 or 20 minute, and there is the slow variety as well. It's more bang for the buck in quantity, and it seems to be good quality stuff.

                    There was something called Zpoxy as well, though I think it was pricier.

                    I'm not aware of any dual-syringe thing that mixes for you, except for the larger, 'construction grade' tubes. Those have a rather long mixing tube, which gets tossed after one use. Some of them come with two mixing tubes, but otherwise are designed as one-use. They might be the best in terms of quantity for dollar, but are useless for small jobs. I have wondered though whether the epoxy in some of those is 'high grade'- it would seem that is the case at least for some of them.

                    If you're having to mix anyway- well it's a personal preference, but I don't prefer the dual-syringe dispensers. I can measure out equal quantities easily enough, and I prefer being able to cap individual containers separately.

                    Thought I'd add this- at work we use what is called backing- it's a 1/8 thick mdf with a durable white coating on one side, used in kitchen cabinets. We always have lots of waste. Time to time I cut the waste up into 3 inch squares, and that's what I use to mix epoxy on. Works great, doesn't absorb either component, and it's a toss away after that. I've probably used about 300 of them in the past couple years- good for mixing body filler as well. I like the fact that they are solid enough to handle, and in my case are free. Visit a cabinet shop and they'll probably be happy for you to take some of that away.
                    Last edited by darryl; 12-30-2013, 05:38 PM.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Yes, those mixing attachments for twin tube dispensers are one use only. And it is a pretty good idea to remove that attachment from the tubes immediately after use if you want to prevent the epoxy from hardening back to the tube openings. The amount of time before the mixing attachment is blocked by hardened epoxy is dependent on the hardening time of the epoxy and can vary from 5 minutes to several hours.

                      These mixing attachments are probably for industrial users who use the epoxy in a time intensive environment where the time involved in mixing the epoxy is more expensive than a new tube of the stuff. They have a bunch of them on hand and just toss them out when they harden. Personally, I am frugal and never use them. An awful lot of epoxy is wasted in the mixing area of the swirl tubes. But if I was to set up an assembly line that used epoxy I would consider them. With proper timing you could probably use most of the epoxy before tossing it.

                      I have been inspired to write up my frugal method for mixing and storing epoxy and when I add the photos I will post it.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      Make it fit.
                      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                      • #12
                        A while back I gave up on the twin tube epoxy dispensers - they ended up being single use most of the time. I went to "Double Bubble" http://www.mcmaster.com/#double-bubb...esives/=q1d9eq for a while which works fine.

                        Just now I am trying Bob Smith epoxy http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1. Just used it for the first time today - seemed to do the job OK, we'll see how long the individual bottles hold up for the long term.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by darryl View Post
                          I would advise that you visit a hobby shop. There is something called 'quick cure', which comes in separate tubes. It's available in a couple of sizes, plus different setting times. One is a 5 minute, another is 15 or 20 minute, and there is the slow variety as well. It's more bang for the buck in quantity, and it seems to be good quality stuff.
                          Hobby shops carry Bob Smith Industries epoxies, sometimes under a private label (but there will be a 'BSI' label on the bottle). It's really good stuff as is their cyanoacrylate adhesives.

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                          • #14
                            I find this type still works fine after being opened for years, it may take a little while longer to harden tho.


                            From Poundland here in the UK, so you guessed it it cost £1.

                            Tits on the tubes can only go on one way round so no mixing the tops up and if it does ever go off it's only a £1

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                            • #15
                              http://www.ebay.com/itm/GPMR6042-Pro...item3f2ab7d2cd

                              They have a 30 min version as well up to 9oz, lasts forever, especially if kept in the freezer, and you can control the mixing rate.

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