Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

We have it EASY---

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I think it is important at least for some short periods of time to go back to basics.
    It can be useful. As a result of needing to crawl back to some kind of fitness after the decline that culminated in open heart surgery, a small stroke and a carotid stent, the docs have me walking a lot, which, in my case, increased my 3-mile commute time considerably. No question about the benefits of a good exercise regimen - and I'm grateful to be able to do it.

    One side effect after a couple of years is a realization that we do, indeed, "have it easy" in many ways. Now, everywhere I drive, no matter what the speed or traffic, I'm always impressed at how plain easy it is to get there. . .
    Cheers,

    Frank Ford
    HomeShopTech

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
      Easy ?

      EASY ??

      Do you know how hard it is to keep this camel on a treadle machine without it biting you ??
      Up there in bradistan they speak fluent camel, you have to find one that fancies you though!
      Happy new year or Diwali or whatever
      Mark

      Comment


      • #18
        I went to the best of both worlds. Desolation with hi-tech green energy.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
          Still in todays world we are bombarded with news of horrific things, blasted by endless advertising , but i suppose one can, if they wish block out much of that by just not having it on.
          (Which i do frequently.)
          Since I retired I don't leave the house to much (necessary shopping and errands for SWMBO and it's F#$%^& cold outside) and rarely the town I live in (3000 people and way to big for my liking). I don't watch the news or read papers so the only news I get is something that is to big to be ignored. When I watch TV it is always off the DVR, the next day, so I can pass through the commercials. The only magazines I read are the ones from Village Press, old Model Engineer and other similar mags, little politics and BS news there. I also built a fence around the back yard to keep the neighbors and the rest of the world out.

          Some might call me a 21st century hermit and maybe I am but I value my privacy, piece and quiet and generally being left alone. I have few friends and that is OK too. If the wife's friends would quit calling her 20 times a day it might be considered near perfect.

          I would love to living out with nature away from "life in the big city", like some of you but at 57 I don't need the hassle and trouble of taking on that kind of move, even if I could afford to. If I was younger I would be gone already. So I do the next best thing, which is to tell the world to F#$$% off and go away.
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

          Comment


          • #20
            Think of it this way, 50 years from now, they'll look back and wonder how we managed with the 'hard living'
            we're doing now.

            "People used to have to push buttons to make phone calls / use "the internet" to get/find stuff / insert-whatever-here"

            After all its all a matter of perspective isn't it? I think my kids have it easy. My dad thought I had it easy, his dad thought
            he had it easy, etc.

            Unless the apocalypse happens and we're all back out scrounging for nuts and berries.

            In which case I'd stand corrected.

            Comment


            • #21
              Lol ,, Loose nut have to agree. One thing i will say about your'e being 57, (i,m almost 70 now,) it is true what your'e saying, and i know from experience having to do what had to be done during my time at it, it is a young man's game, you gotta be in shape to do this, and enjoy it.
              I loved it while it was happening, but sure wouldn't want to try and start over now.

              Comment


              • #22
                When I was a kid we had a rotary phone. You had a party line, and had to share time with whoever else was using it. You needed an operator to make long distance calls.

                When I was 19, I went to Africa. At one point I needed to make a long distance call to Canada. We had to drive to a location where there was a phone, about three miles away, and it was a hand crank one. You would crank it, then at some point an operator would notice that someone was trying to use the system. At first there was a language barrier- I spoke 'sterile' english, and she spoke 'british' english. So we got that worked out, and she began to try to find an overseas operator. Took awhile, but then that operator had to try to get a working line. She got one, but it wasn't working very well. I was told to hang by the phone while the local operator kept in touch with the other one. After about 20 minutes the phone rang and the overseas operator had a better line. That was the highlight of the afternoon- getting my call through.

                That phone was located at a crossroads where both roads dipped downwards where they crossed. One day we were approaching that intersection when it began to rain. Anyone who has been there knows how hard it can rain- you couldn't see more than a foot or so beyond your windshield. We came to a stop right in the middle of the intersection to wait it out. By the time the rain stopped about five minutes later, the water level in the intersection had risen up to the door sills on our van. Fun times.

                Speaking of retro, we were driving along one day when I saw a khaki-sporting policeman peering intently into a wooden box at the side of the road. He then gave a signal to his partner standing at perfect attention down the road a ways, who then pointed his arm and finger to a car and yelled 'STOP'! The car pulls over and the white officer (the other was black) runs down the road to give the person a speeding ticket. The wooden box was his radar set.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                Comment


                • #23
                  Interesting story Darryl. (When i was young we had a party line also, but the phone was the old wooden wall cranked one that ran on dry cell batteries.) The operator , (when you cranked the handle on the side,) came on and was refered to as "Central".
                  Then you told her the number you wished to call, and she would connect the call up.
                  Then as the conversation started you'd hear click-click, as others on the line would pick up their receiver, to listen in , everyone knew what others were doing, or what was going on!! Lol
                  (One had to be carefull not to Gossip!!) Lol

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Our 'old days' is 'now' in many 3rd world countires.
                    Just watched 10 minutes of fireworks on the colour TV while surfing the 'net on a 60meg cable line. News has had fireworks form every country round the world, live, in turn all evening. In the old days we only did fireworks (a little rocket that just went up and fizzled out) on 5th November and the TV (405 line B&W) shut down at 5 past midnight on new years day ie 10 minutes later than normal.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Everyone,

                      My wife and I chose to try to homestead for raising our family. The most difficult thing wasn't the work but being pulled in two different directions all the time because out young children were in public schools.

                      It was a big deal when I got our outhouse finished:



                      No more 5 gal. potty pail that I had to empty every day..........well almost every day. Sometimes I fell behind!

                      I was always thankful that we had electricity. It allowed me to take my shop with me:

                      http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...woods%E2%80%A6

                      Our children learned a work ethic that still serves my daughter today and our son while he was with us. They never knew any other way.

                      I don't feel that it was just a work ethic they learned though.

                      A few years ago my daughter was working as an office manager for a financial planner out here in a city. One of his assistants offered a bribe to my daughter to release information from another firm in their complex. She refused & the bribe kept climbing eventually to $5000.00. She only got more angry & dug her heels in deeper. Then her boss joined in with the assistant!!!!!!!!!!

                      She left!

                      I doubt that her boss or the assistant ever had to 'work' in their lives. These are the people that will have the hardest time coping if/when times get tough.

                      I just looked up the above 'shop in the woods' thread and saw how many of you 'old timers' here responded. Even found this response that says so much of what feel:

                      Originally posted by Bill736 View Post
                      Jim- My, you certainly put some major time and work into your W. Virginia homestead. Those were pioneering efforts ! I assume a job change , or perhaps family changes, took you to Arizona. I did my own "pioneering" 35 years ago on my property and home, and I managed to stay here throughout the years. I suppose what I regret the most is getting too old for that sort of thing . And these days, I can only watch as my little "empire" decays and crumbles from neglect. In many ways , that " rough and tumble" work, although challenging and difficult , was still the most memorable and fun times I've ever had.
                      I noticed that I never mentioned why we left & I don't know if Bill736 is still listening. Only now that I am feeling more comfortable with this group will I touch the topic.

                      I wouldn't hesitate to return to that lifestyle in a minute if I could, but one night two drunken locals tried to kill me and were stopped by the presence of an angel.

                      That has a way of changing a person's perspective.

                      I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything. I'm only explaining what I have experienced. The lesson that I learned is that I owe my life to something far greater than me.

                      Curiously, I have also learned that Buckminster Fuller was given a similar lesson.
                      Last edited by jhe.1973; 01-01-2014, 12:08 AM.
                      Best wishes to ya’ll.

                      Sincerely,

                      Jim

                      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                      Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Nice post Jim, i remember your'e post from before after checking it.
                        Best to you and your'e family in 2014.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I think I must represent the contrarian side here --I think we do have it easy, but I also think we have much, much, harder times in front of us then we have had behind us. Anyway that's how my 73 yr old eyes see it.

                          When you read my opine on this it might be worth remembering that I am a survivor of some fairly hard times, here and there in some of the worlds hell holes. So when I say hard times I do mean exactly that, and I know what hard is.

                          It's very likely that some or even many of you do also --which explains the desire for it all to get better... Hope, chains, and you can keep it if you like it... sure thing.

                          Zero.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            When I was a kid we had it really hard. It was ten miles to walk to the little red school house, up hill both ways. It really wasnt too bad although it could be a bit dangerous crossing the glacier in the dark especially on the days when the neighbours kids got the use of the one pair of crampons. The school house was really cold in winter until one year the school committee had a fund raising and bought us a candle to warm the place which was nice while it lasted which was only a few days. The McDougal kids from down the valley stole the candle, we knew it was them because they must have dropped the candle on their way home and when the spring came the flame thawed and started a forest fire.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                              When I was a kid we had it really hard. It was ten miles to walk to the little red school house, up hill both ways. It really wasnt too bad although it could be a bit dangerous crossing the glacier in the dark especially on the days when the neighbours kids got the use of the one pair of crampons. The school house was really cold in winter until one year the school committee had a fund raising and bought us a candle to warm the place which was nice while it lasted which was only a few days. The McDougal kids from down the valley stole the candle, we knew it was them because they must have dropped the candle on their way home and when the spring came the flame thawed and started a forest fire.
                              Darn, you should have told us that sooner --it explains the apparent dysfunctional education you seem to have obtained. You did have it hard. Still do, what with living upside down and all...

                              It's a humor test -- now we see if you pass...

                              Zero.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                                When I was a kid we had it really hard. It was ten miles to walk to the little red school house, up hill both ways. It really wasnt too bad although it could be a bit dangerous crossing the glacier in the dark especially on the days when the neighbours kids got the use of the one pair of crampons. The school house was really cold in winter until one year the school committee had a fund raising and bought us a candle to warm the place which was nice while it lasted which was only a few days. The McDougal kids from down the valley stole the candle, we knew it was them because they must have dropped the candle on their way home and when the spring came the flame thawed and started a forest fire.
                                WOW!

                                Sounds like the U.S during my parents generation.

                                I finally realized that there must have only been one school somewhere in the middle of the states and everyone had to walk to it.

                                Global warming is a good thing too 'cuz it was always snowing then.
                                Best wishes to ya’ll.

                                Sincerely,

                                Jim

                                "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                                "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                                Location: Bustling N.E. Arizona

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X