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OT- heat-sealing fire hose

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  • #16
    I had an IGLOO (Brand name) tent in the 70s, it used 2 inflatable tubes to form 2 arches, these formed the frame of the tent. The only opening was a circular door. All you had to do was connect a pump to the valve and you had instant tent. The ends of the tubes were sealed with a 2 part wooden clamp, shaped something like a press tool for folding sheet metal, a wire loop was attached to this for pegging to the ground.
    The maximum inflation pressure was 10 psi or so.

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    • #17
      I'm with the fold and clamp school. I doubt that even the correct glue would hold if there is any real pressure trying to pry it apart. Consider, an inner tube in a tire can be patched, but the tire on the outside provides a large amount of inward force to hold that patch on.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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      • #18
        Cars parked on our fire hose seemed to work pretty well. We then had to test it and insure it was not damaged. Repair was done with a specialized crimper with an insert also placed inside the hose. I would contact your local Fire Dept and see who does their hose repair. They should be able to put a real end on it. Then you can use a real cap and put an air fitting in that. That will be a repair that should last for as long as the hose. Mike

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        • #19
          OK, thats a bit more info. If its a 3" it could be rubber, a rubber hybrid or just about any other kind of plastic, although synthetic rubber is the most common. Normally, the hose would have markings on it, a stripped line, NFPA number and a "test to" pressure if it was for Fire Department use. It may be a forestry hose, as they fall under a totally different code section.

          Now, if you talking wanting to hold anything less than 50 psi air, you can probably just put some glue on the rubber and "Stitch it" with a sewing machine, as it should have no problems holding. You could get ends, but they need a specialized machine to put them on and are REALLY expensive as most Fire Dept ones use brass ends only. (and people cut them off in building for scrap)

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          • #20
            Well, I had a good laugh this morning. I used the rubber cement yesterday and 'glued' in a strip. Today I took the clamps off, and the join didn't even stay together under no pressure. I rubbed the cement out easily with my fingers, and there was nothing left of the cement- virtually no residue. What absolute crap that **** is! I kind of expected that, but I thought I'd give it a try anyway.

            The fact that pvc pipe cement worked to a good degree suggests that the material is a synthetic elastomer of sorts. But the pvc cement is not particularly flexible, and I'd expect it to crack and leak.

            My next test if going to be to swab some naptha on the material and see if it has what's called a 'severe effect'. I took these words from the Cole Parmer chemical compatability site. If it does, then tool handle coating would probably work well enough as a sealant. Seal and sew is probably going to do it, and crimp if needed.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #21
              Ok, naptha- no effect. StripX, a chemical meant for stripping enamel from magnet wire- no effect to the surface, but hardens the material quite a bit. My bottle of methylene chloride- gone, evaporated out of the bottle. Rubber Renew- same thing, evaporated out of the bottle. Both had lids on tight. Found another bottle of Rubber Renew- this might work as a sensitizer as it dulls the surface after wiping, but doesn't seem to penetrate or dissolve the material at all. I don't recall the solvent in this, but it sure stinks- maybe that's the odorant added though.

              I should have entitled this topic 'adventures in adhering to elastomers'.
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #22
                Try lightly skimming the area to be bonded with a blowtorch. We call this flame-treating, it is required to make certain polymers bond-able.

                Be aware some elastomers, once cured, cannot be reactivated by any means. That means no solvent bonding. In that case you are stuck using a surface treatment and adhesive. *CSI SCREAM*

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                • #23
                  Flame treating, yes I had forgotten about that. Something else to try-
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #24
                    Instead of making the end flat, make a round plug that goes into the end of the hose and then put a hose clamp around this. You can turn a slight depression into the plug where the hose clamp goes to prevent the plug from blowing out. Kind of like how a radiator hose goes onto a radiator.

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                    • #25
                      Hadn't thought of that, but I'll consider it also.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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