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How are most lathe carriage locks designed?

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  • How are most lathe carriage locks designed?

    I need to make one for mine. What would be the best way to do it? Thanks

  • #2
    Mine and many other lathe's I have seen have just a bolt that snugs up a square metal washer to the bottom of the front veeway, essentially just pinching the carriage down to the vee. Whatever arrangement you might make, be sure that you don't cause the carriage to lift on either end of the way. It might be easier to do something at the rear way, usually the flat. Mine has a plate that is bolted underneath the way, to control the play at that end of the carriage. A thumbscrew instead of the center bolt thru this plate would get me the locking action without tilting the carriage. Maybe there's something similar on your lathe.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by darryl:
      It might be easier to do something at the rear way, usually the flat. Mine has a plate that is bolted underneath the way, to control the play at that end of the carriage. .</font>
      If your back way is flat, then the front of the carriage can slightly climb the way as it twists around the rear-side lock.

      I would think it better to put it on the front then, so it snugs down on the V and is more likely to be rigid.

      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Good point, J Tiers. My experience with this is that most cutting forces tend to keep the carriage pressed down onto the veeway, and with the rear of the carriage floating a bit, as it did on my lathe, there was some uncertainty surrounding the actual position of the cutter. I use the thumbscrew to snug the rear way rather than lock it, but it's a pain to have to attend to this all the time. For someone without a carriage lock, it might make sense to create some kind of cam action to pull the carriage down between the ways, similar to how the tailstock is clamped, although that might tend to warp the carriage, and you wouldn't want that. Ideally, you'd want to be able to hold both sides of the carriage snug to the veeway, and have all the play at the rear way taken up. As I look at the underside on my carriage, I can see where a cam could pull from the center of the carriage, just inside the front way. That would be a single point clamp that takes care of all motion, or at least it would for my setup.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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