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Rebuilding a Power Hacksaw

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  • Rebuilding a Power Hacksaw

    Wondering if anyone has experience rebuilding a Power Hacksaw. I have a used one in dire need of TLC and have used them in the past, they are a great piece of equipment.
    Any help or point of direction greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hydro Machinist View Post
    Wondering if anyone has experience rebuilding a Power Hacksaw. I have a used one in dire need of TLC and have used them in the past, they are a great piece of equipment.
    Any help or point of direction greatly appreciated.
    What brand? Got pictures?

    I recently rebuilt a Lipe-Rollaway Hand-I-Hack Model C (google it) which was very straightforward. The biggest challenge was finding the correct oil for the gearbox (rear-axle oil has sulfur in it which will attack bronze gears). I use Ford 600W (that's a trade name, not a grade) oil which works just great. Here's were you can get a quart: http://macsautoparts.com/search.asp?...s=600w&x=0&y=0

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    • #3
      Welcome!

      Is there particular info you are looking for? I refurbished an old Keller power hacksaw a number of years back. What I did maybe fell short of a true "rebuild" but I did get it back to great working condition. It had lived in a vocational school shop for many years, with all of the rough handling and abuse that tends to go along with that environment. It is a neat old machine that I use all the time.

      Info on your saw and photos are always helpful. If you have specific questions, ask away. No doubt there will be lots of input from those who frequent this place. There is an amazing pool of knowledge here, free for the asking.

      And just a suggestion, you may want to add some general location to your profile. It helps those who reply to your posts to offer more relevant info. For example, there would be little point in referring you to McMaster-Carr for parts if you live someplace in Europe...

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      • #4
        I'm in the process of rebuilding a Craftsman power hacksaw right now. I've got it down to fully dismantled, except getting the main pully off the primary shaft. I'm scrubbing with grease remover and bead/walnut blasting. Then priming and painting.

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        • #5
          Using rear axle oil will not attack bronze or brass bushings or gears. There is an issue with using the extreme pressure rating GL-5 with a snynchro mesh gear set. It is just too slippery and the friction cones will wear instead of engage. I don't see that as problem in a hacksaw box, unless there is some kind of clutch in there. Mike

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          • #6
            Ive bought two, with the intention of rebuilding, scrapped the two of them when moving house, remember the blade lift was bust on both, along with a discovered crack through one, not been succesful with hacksaws!
            Mark
            Battery ran out, kids!, welcome, i have a fascination with hacksaws, and shapers!, and any other machine too, the blade lift mechanism seems to be the achilles heel of them, if it fails blades die fast I've found, i will get one eventually i suppose but common sense tells me to get a bandsaw, horizontal that is, i have a pedrazzoli cold saw on loan at the moment and i will be sorry to see it go! Lovely machine!
            Last edited by boslab; 01-16-2014, 06:37 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
              Using rear axle oil will not attack bronze or brass bushings or gears. There is an issue with using the extreme pressure rating GL-5 with a snynchro mesh gear set. It is just too slippery and the friction cones will wear instead of engage. I don't see that as problem in a hacksaw box, unless there is some kind of clutch in there. Mike
              There probably are some GL-5 oils which will not attack bronze or brass, but that's not true about all of them.

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              • #8
                I bought myself a nice qualters and smith hacksaw a big heavy enclosed one.It cuts through a six inch h beam without any problem. I did have trouble with the raising and falling, so I changed out the oil to quite a thick pump oil it was not cheap but worked right away.I don't use it everyday but when I do need it it is fantastic saves on the old elbow greease. LOL Alistair
                Last edited by Alistair Hosie; 01-16-2014, 03:32 PM.
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
                  Using rear axle oil will not attack bronze or brass bushings or gears. There is an issue with using the extreme pressure rating GL-5 with a snynchro mesh gear set. It is just too slippery and the friction cones will wear instead of engage. I don't see that as problem in a hacksaw box, unless there is some kind of clutch in there. Mike
                  Sorry, but that is wrong. EP oils (and all hypoid rear axle oils are EP oils) can contain sulfur (or chlorine) which is corrosive to copper and copper alloys like bronze and brass.

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                  • #10
                    I have a Craftsman (this style: http://www.home-gym-bodybuilding.com...files/phs1.jpg) and have replaced the bushings and blades, cleaned it up, and cross-braced the stand it is on but I cannot keep the blade from hopping on the work to the point the blade snaps while cutting 1018 rounds. I have heavy duty 1" x14T blades from Enco - well, I have one left. Using the thinner 1/2" standard hacksaw blades seems to last longer in the snapping department, but are too flimsy.

                    I still find the shop-made saw my Dad made works best but does not cut at 90؛ accurately.

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                    • #11
                      I have that same saw except for whatever that gizmo is in the middle of the harp.

                      I'm not convinced mine rises properly on the away stroke but haven't wanted to run the risk of fouling it up as it's cutting well enough. Is there a common procedure for adjusting the wear out of these?

                      That's a fine-looking paint job.

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                      • #12
                        IMO, the smallish ones like in dp's post are crap. They were crap new and worse crap after use. Rebuild it and you've still got crap.

                        Most of the bigger, heavy ones I've seen are good. As to rebuilding, are you talking a "Sherwin-Williams" rebuild or a mechanical rebuild?

                        If it really needs mechanical type rebuild work that can require extensive experience (think scraping) and associated machinery to do the work. Can you pust a picture to give a better idea of what you have?

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                        • #13
                          I know old ideas die hard but I hate to waste my money on snake oil. If you check out the NEWER RATINGS for gear oil you will find quotes like this.

                          " Most GL5 differential and GL4 Manual Transmission oils contain sulfur-phosphorous EP packages. GL4 does NOT refer to any specific viscosity, but it refers to a level of AW/EP protection for the gearing and bearings in a transmission. GL4-rated oils contain about 40% to 60% of the EP additives that GL5 oils contain.

                          Both differential and manual transmission fluids use chemical compounds that subdue or inhibit the corrosive effects of sulfur and phosphorous such as calcium, magnesium, boron, potassium or other basic compounds. Emulsifiers, corrosion and rust inhibitors also are included to do their respective jobs.

                          GL5 differential lubes use friction modifiers to reduce mechanical and fluid friction and add some anti-shudder friction modifier for limited slip, both very different chemical compounds.

                          Manual Transmission fluids use a different friction modifier for synchro engagement, a modifier that does NOT contain the same Friction Modifier chemicals as differential lubes.

                          Most manual transmission "specific" fluids (GL4) contain about 40% to 60% of the EP additive of differential lubes (GL5) with inactive or buffered sulphurs. GL4 has come to infer a gear lube with the above percentages of EP additive. The exception of course is ATF fluid used in some of the newer transmissions.

                          Therefore, both lubes contain the same EP additives, just in different strengths or additive ratios".

                          I have no evidence of excessive wear or corrosion in anything I have that uses these oils. So until I see a bushing or gear with a oil related problem, I would reccommend them for use in any of small gear boxes like these saws might have. Mike

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