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  • Metric Dial gauges

    I recently purchased a Mituyo 1160 for checking the runout on a transmission shaft , it has divisions on 0.01mm which equates to around 0.0003 thousands of an inch , does anyone know the thread used for mounting this on a rod. as the grubscrew is missing and just has a soft plastic plug to keep the crap out.

    Thanks in advance.
    Michael

  • #2
    As a guess, it will be a metric thread.

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    • #3
      do you have a local hardware store that carried a good assortment of screws and bolts? that's where I go when I have a female thread I need to identify. they are very good about it as I am a customer but they are good anyway.
      just what I do. . . . . . .

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      • #4
        It's odd how that feature isn't dimensioned on the manufacturer's drawings I find. That said--and not owning one of these particular indicators--my guess would be M6. Why? Because the holding bars are offered in either 6 or 8mm diameters. M5 is a relatively uncommon thread. M4 is probably a bit dainty. M6, though, is extremely common and matches the smaller holding bar diameter. So does it look about 1/4" size?
        Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 01-20-2014, 08:40 PM.

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        • #5
          Yes, the best way to ID it is with a known screw. If you don't have any metrics in stock, you should get at least a small assortment to have on hand. I assume you have some English thread screws around, or do you?

          Originally posted by davidh View Post
          do you have a local hardware store that carried a good assortment of screws and bolts? that's where I go when I have a female thread I need to identify. they are very good about it as I am a customer but they are good anyway.
          just what I do. . . . . . .
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the suggestions , several of which I have tried , including looking up the specs, none of the threads which I have do fit , and I wont force it as I value my measuring tools.

            I have ordered a bar from Mituyo , when it arrives I will note what thread pitch and dia it is and put that in the box with the indicator.
            Michael

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            • #7
              Not meaning to hijack the thread, but just yesterday I saw an ad for a metric dial guage that had dial divisions of 0.001mm. (For the metrically challenged, that's just under 0.00004 inches.)
              I suspect that might be a bit ambitious for my skill level.
              http://www.trademe.co.nz/business-fa...-688244520.htm

              Comment


              • #8
                This one reads to 0.01mm which is around 0.0003 of an inch , good enough for the shaft which I am checking.
                Michael

                Comment


                • #9
                  If the instrument is intended for possible mounting on photographic bits and pieces it might be 1/4" Whitworth.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mike4 View Post
                    This one reads to 0.01mm which is around 0.0003 of an inch , good enough for the shaft which I am checking.
                    Michael
                    Sorry to correct you but it's actually almost 0.0004" (0.000394")
                    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                    Monarch 10EE 1942

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why do people have to get pedantic with measurements , I did say it was around 0.0003 the 0.000094 doesnt really matter in most daily used equipment and if it did then I would purchase an electron microscope and a set of similarly scaled scraping tools to remove a few atoms which may be forming a ridge on the surface.
                      Perfection is not something to strive for in many areas , if a part fits and works as well as lasting, that is what really matters , sometimes that last few tenth's or hundreths of a thou can push the repair time into an area where customers can and have refused to pay for excessive time spent .

                      If a part will allow a machine however large or small to be put back into service where it earns dollars for the owner and it lasts longer than the original , then that is what I look to acheive .

                      I do most of my work for money and have built a reputation for quick and lasting repairs over quite a few years .
                      I can work to the fine tolerances that many here take pride in acheiving but if that is not required then why spend 4 - 6 hours on a part with the constant risk of scrapping a weeks work in total just for someone elses gratification..
                      Michael

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                      • #12
                        Michael,

                        You might like to re-read your original post (#1). Does it really say what you meant it to?

                        George

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mike4 View Post
                          Why do people have to get pedantic with measurements , I did say it was around 0.0003 the 0.000094 doesnt really matter in most daily used equipment and if it did then I would purchase an electron microscope and a set of similarly scaled scraping tools to remove a few atoms which may be forming a ridge on the surface.
                          Perfection is not something to strive for in many areas , if a part fits and works as well as lasting, that is what really matters , sometimes that last few tenth's or hundreths of a thou can push the repair time into an area where customers can and have refused to pay for excessive time spent .

                          If a part will allow a machine however large or small to be put back into service where it earns dollars for the owner and it lasts longer than the original , then that is what I look to acheive .

                          I do most of my work for money and have built a reputation for quick and lasting repairs over quite a few years .
                          I can work to the fine tolerances that many here take pride in acheiving but if that is not required then why spend 4 - 6 hours on a part with the constant risk of scrapping a weeks work in total just for someone elses gratification..
                          Michael
                          Well I do apologise Mike, it wasn't my intention to ruffle your feathers in such a way. I'd ask you to consider though that your conversion factor can be applied to millimetres as easily as hundredths of a millimetre. Now you have a ten thou error.
                          Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                          Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                          Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                          Monarch 10EE 1942

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Holding bars I have seen are either 6mm, 8mm or 1/4". Wouldn't think it would be that hard to work out the size of such a simple thing. Nev.
                            Nev.

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                            • #15
                              136568 - Holding bar ط8 mm, L81 mm 21AAA168 - Holding bar ط8 mm, L42 mm That's what I can find so far. Nev.
                              Last edited by NiftyNev; 01-22-2014, 06:29 AM.
                              Nev.

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